Biblio

Filters: Author is Lou, Wenjing  [Clear All Filters]
2016
Gaebel, Ethan, Zhang, Ning, Lou, Wenjing, Hou, Y. Thomas.  2016.  Looks Good To Me: Authentication for Augmented Reality. Proceedings of the 6th International Workshop on Trustworthy Embedded Devices. :57–67.

Augmented reality is poised to become a dominant computing paradigm over the next decade. With promises of three-dimensional graphics and interactive interfaces, augmented reality experiences will rival the very best science fiction novels. This breakthrough also brings in unique challenges on how users can authenticate one another to share rich content between augmented reality headsets. Traditional authentication protocols fall short when there is no common central entity or when access to the central authentication server is not available or desirable. Looks Good To Me (LGTM) is an authentication protocol that leverages the unique hardware and context provided with augmented reality headsets to bring innate human trust mechanisms into the digital world to solve authentication in a usable and secure way. LGTM works over point to point wireless communication so users can authenticate one another in a variety of circumstances and is designed with usability at its core, requiring users to perform only two actions: one to initiate and one to confirm. Users intuitively authenticate one another, using seemingly only each other's faces, but under the hood LGTM uses a combination of facial recognition and wireless localization to bootstrap trust from a wireless signal, to a location, to a face, for secure and usable authentication.

Zheng, Yao, Schulz, Matthias, Lou, Wenjing, Hou, Y. Thomas, Hollick, Matthias.  2016.  Profiling the Strength of Physical-Layer Security: A Study in Orthogonal Blinding. Proceedings of the 9th ACM Conference on Security & Privacy in Wireless and Mobile Networks. :21–30.

Physical layer security for wireless communication is broadly considered as a promising approach to protect data confidentiality against eavesdroppers. However, despite its ample theoretical foundation, the transition to practical implementations of physical-layer security still lacks success. A close inspection of proven vulnerable physical-layer security designs reveals that the flaws are usually overlooked when the scheme is only evaluated against an inferior, single-antenna eavesdropper. Meanwhile, the attacks exposing vulnerabilities often lack theoretical justification. To reduce the gap between theory and practice, we posit that a physical-layer security scheme must be studied under multiple adversarial models to fully grasp its security strength. In this regard, we evaluate a specific physical-layer security scheme, i.e. orthogonal blinding, under multiple eavesdropper settings. We further propose a practical "ciphertext-only attack" that allows eavesdroppers to recover the original message by exploiting the low entropy fields in wireless packets. By means of simulation, we are able to reduce the symbol error rate at an eavesdropper below 1% using only the eavesdropper's receiving data and a general knowledge about the format of the wireless packets.

2017
Zhang, Ruide, Zhang, Ning, Du, Changlai, Lou, Wenjing, Hou, Y. Thomas, Kawamoto, Yuichi.  2017.  From Electromyogram to Password: Exploring the Privacy Impact of Wearables in Augmented Reality. ACM Trans. Intell. Syst. Technol.. 9:13:1–13:20.

With the increasing popularity of augmented reality (AR) services, providing seamless human-computer interactions in the AR setting has received notable attention in the industry. Gesture control devices have recently emerged to be the next great gadgets for AR due to their unique ability to enable computer interaction with day-to-day gestures. While these AR devices are bringing revolutions to our interaction with the cyber world, it is also important to consider potential privacy leakages from these always-on wearable devices. Specifically, the coarse access control on current AR systems could lead to possible abuse of sensor data. Although the always-on gesture sensors are frequently quoted as a privacy concern, there has not been any study on information leakage of these devices. In this article, we present our study on side-channel information leakage of the most popular gesture control device, Myo. Using signals recorded from the electromyography (EMG) sensor and accelerometers on Myo, we can recover sensitive information such as passwords typed on a keyboard and PIN sequence entered through a touchscreen. EMG signal records subtle electric currents of muscle contractions. We design novel algorithms based on dynamic cumulative sum and wavelet transform to determine the exact time of finger movements. Furthermore, we adopt the Hudgins feature set in a support vector machine to classify recorded signal segments into individual fingers or numbers. We also apply coordinate transformation techniques to recover fine-grained spatial information with low-fidelity outputs from the sensor in keystroke recovery. We evaluated the information leakage using data collected from a group of volunteers. Our results show that there is severe privacy leakage from these commodity wearable sensors. Our system recovers complex passwords constructed with lowercase letters, uppercase letters, numbers, and symbols with a mean success rate of 91%.