News Items

  • news

    Visible to the public "You’d Better Change Your Birthday – Hackers may Know Your PIN"

    In a study it was discovered that 26 percent of individuals use the top 20 most used PIN numbers, which makes guessing of PIN numbers quite easy. Most individuals also use important dates when it comes to creating PIN numbers. It is important that the person that creates a PIN makes sure that the number that is used is not able to be found publicly, for example a birthday or wedding date. It is important that PIN numbers be at least 6 numbers in length, but the more numbers a PIN is made up of, the harder it will be to guess for the hackers.

    WeLiveSecurity reports: "You'd Better Change Your Birthday - Hackers may Know Your PIN"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Researchers Develop 'Vaccine' Against Attacks on Machine Learning"

    A significant breakthrough in machine learning (ML) research has been made by researchers from the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization's (CSIRO) Data61, an arm of Australia's national science agency specializing in data and digital technology. Researchers have developed techniques to prevent adversarial attacks on ML. Adversarial attacks on ML refer to attacks in which malicious data inputs are used to interfere with the functioning of ML models. The techniques developed by researchers to combat such attacks are similar to those used in the vaccination process. This article continues to discuss ML algorithms, the vulnerability of ML to adversarial attacks, and the new set of techniques developed to prevent these attacks.

    CSIRO reports "Researchers Develop 'Vaccine' Against Attacks on Machine Learning"

  • news

    Visible to the public "A Malware Can Bypass ‘2FA’ In ‘Android’ Phones, Researchers Found"

    Researchers have discovered the distribution of malware via the Google Play Store that can evade security firewalls. This discovery follows Google's confirmation that some low-end Android devices contain pre-installed malware. According to cybersecurity researchers from We Live Security by ESET, Google's new SMS restrictions can be circumvented by specific applications that can be downloaded from the Google Play Store. These malicious applications can bypass two-factor authentication (2FA). As a result of the evasion of 2FA, one-time passwords (OTPs) in SMS 2FA messages can be accessed. In addition, OTPs from emails can also be accessed by the malware. This article continues to discuss the capabilities and evolution of the malware.

    Z6 Magazine reports "A Malware Can Bypass '2FA' In 'Android' Phones, Researchers Found"

  • news

    Visible to the public Pub Crawl #28

  • news

    Visible to the public SoS Musings #27 - DNS Attacks

    SoS Musings #27
    DNS Attacks

  • news

    Visible to the public "LTE Flaws Let Hackers ‘Easily’ Spoof Presidential Alerts"

    Hackers can use off-the-shelf equipment and open source software to exploit security vulnerabilities in LTE that could allow them to spoof presidential alerts disseminated to mobile devices, which could lead to panic and chaos. The attack designed by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder could allow alerts to be sent by malicious actors, to every phone in a 50,000-seat football stadium. This article continues to discuss the attack developed by researchers, the LTE vulnerabilities that make such attacks possible, and how these vulnerabilities could be fixed.

    TechCrunch reports "LTE Flaws Let Hackers 'Easily' Spoof Presidential Alerts"

  • news

    Visible to the public "New Research Reveals a Surprising World of IoT"

    A study has been done by researchers from Stanford University in which they examined user-initiated scans of 16 million homes and 83 million devices to further explore the use of Internet of Things (IoT) devices. From the analysis of scans and devices, researchers found that the security of older IoT devices such as printers, game consoles, and more, are often overlooked by consumers and the security research community. This article continues to discuss other findings of the study in relation to the varied use and security of IoT devices in different regions as well as the domination of IoT devices by a small group of vendors, the security of older IoT devices, and how privacy was ensured by researchers in the performance of this study.

    Security Boulevard reports "New Research Reveals a Surprising World of IoT"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Healthcare Overconfident in Privacy Maturity, As Breach Rate Rises"

    Integris researchers conducted a survey to which 258 top business executives and IT decision makers who work in medium-sized to large-sized healthcare organizations responded. Results of the survey reveal that most healthcare organizations are overly confident in their privacy policies despite the healthcare sector being one of the sectors with the most breaches in 2018. This article continues to discuss other findings of the survey in relation to healthcare organizations' overconfidence in their privacy maturity in addition to what drives privacy decisions.

    HealthITSecurity reports "Healthcare Overconfident in Privacy Maturity, As Breach Rate Rises"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Three Quarters of Mobile Apps Have This Security Vulnerability Which Could Put Your Personal Data at Risk"

    According to Positive Technologies' Vulnerabilities and Threats in Mobile Applications 2019 report, most iOS and Android applications contain vulnerabilities that could allow hackers to steal sensitive data. These vulnerabilities derive from insecure data storage, posing a threat to the security and privacy of users' sensitive information. This article continues to discuss key findings of the report in relation to the common vulnerabilities identified in the tested mobile applications and what the exploitation of these vulnerabilities could allow hackers to do, along with the importance of designing apps with security in mind and how users can protect themselves.

    ZDNet reports "Three Quarters of Mobile Apps Have This Security Vulnerability Which Could Put Your Personal Data at Risk"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Google Turns to Retro Cryptography to Keep Data Sets Private"

    An open source cryptographic tool, called Private Join and Compute, has been released by Google to bolster the privacy of confidential data sets. The multi-party computation (MPC) tool was designed to help organizations with confidential data sets collaborate for research purposes without exposing their raw data. Through the use of this tool, each party can encrypt their data before they share it with each other. Each party would only be able to see results that can be used to discover commonalities, not the raw data. Private Join and Compute uses updated methods that were developed in the 1970s and 1990s. This article continues to discuss the methods and purpose of Private Join and Compute.

    Wired reports "Google Turns to Retro Cryptography to Keep Data Sets Private"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Report on Cognitive Security Market, Trend, Segmentation and Forecast 2026"

    The growing frequency of cyberattacks has resulted in more interest in cognitive security. Cognitive security solutions are expected to help increase the speed at which risk patterns in internal and external sources are analyzed. The implementation of cognitive security can also help security analysts get a better understanding of business functions' different cognitive components to increase the effectiveness of those functions. A research report that explores the cognitive security market has been released. This article continues to discuss the contents of the report in relation to the cognitive security market and the growing demand for cognitive security solutions.

    Global Market Research reports "Report on Cognitive Security Market, Trend, Segmentation and Forecast 2026"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Facebook’s Libra: Cryptocurrencies in the Mainstream or a Hacker’s Paradise?"

    As Facebook's plans to introduce Libra, there are a few main questions. Does the introduction of cryptocurrency on Facebook signal cryptocurrencies entering the mainstream or will it be a hacker's paradise? Libra will allow people to buy things or send money instantly with nearly zero fees, and could be good for the reputation of cryptocurrencies. However it will still be important that Libra is totally secure, to protect it from hackers. Monetizing accounts and attention is going to lead to a spike in fraud, which could further reduce consumer trust in Facebooks platform.

    Information Age reports: "Facebook's Libra: Cryptocurrencies in the Mainstream or a Hacker's Paradise?"

  • news

    Visible to the public "These Wi-Fi Extenders Had Vulnerabilities That Gave Hackers Complete Control"

    According to security researchers from IBM, Wi-Fi extenders from the router company, TP-Link, contain a critical vulnerability that could allow attackers to take over them. Through the exploitation of this vulnerability, attackers could perform malicious activities such as add the extenders to a botnet, redirect people to malicious pages, and more. Wi-Fi extenders expand the coverage of Wi-Fi by amplifying the wireless signal from a router, enabling the connection of distant Internet of Things devices such as security cameras and doorbells. This article continues to discuss the critical vulnerability discovered in Wi-Fi extenders, the extenders affected by the vulnerability, and the potential attacks that could be executed as a result of this flaw.

    CNET reports "These Wi-Fi Extenders Had Vulnerabilities That Gave Hackers Complete Control"

  • news

    Visible to the public "SUTD Researchers Enhance Security In Proof Of Stake Blockchain Protocols"

    Blockchain technology has attracted much attention from banks, governments, and techno-corporations as the technology has the potential to improve upon security and privacy. Proof of Stake (PoS) is a consensus algorithm used in Blockchain technology to provide security. However, PoS Blockchain protocols have been discovered to be vulnerable to faults caused by validators, who are users that verify transactions within a blockchain by voting. Faults are caused when validators unintentionally or maliciously withhold their votes. Researchers from Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) have designed an algorithm to protect against such faults. This article continues to discuss the increased interest in Blockchain technology, the protocols used by this technology to provide security, and the algorithm designed by researchers to improve the security of these protocols.

    Science Magazine reports "SUTD Researchers Enhance Security In Proof Of Stake Blockchain Protocols"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Research Shows Tesla Model 3 and Model S are Vulnerable to GPS Spoofing Attacks"

    During a study, researchers were able to remotely affect various aspects of the driving experience of the Tesla Model 3, including navigation, mapping, power calculations, and the suspension system, through GPS spoofing. During a test drive using Tesla's Navigate on Autopilot feature, a staged attack caused the car to suddenly slow down and unexpectedly veer off the main road. Even though the effect of GPS spoofing on Tesla cars is minimal when an individual is not using autopilot, it can be dangerous when autopilot is in use, and if the individual does not have control of the vehicle. Even in autopilot mode, users are expected to still be in control of the vehicle, which makes this attack not to much of a safety risk. This research shows how important it is for automobile companies to take security seriously as vehicles become more controlled by computers.

    HELP NET SECURITY reports: "Research Shows Tesla Model 3 and Model S are Vulnerable to GPS Spoofing Attacks"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Hack Your State Department Act Introduced in Senate"

    Senators, Cory Gardner (R-CO) and Ed Markey (D-MA), recently introduced the Hack Your State Department Act. The legislation would establish a process for the general public to properly disclose vulnerabilities that they find in the Department of State's internet-facing information technology. Under the legislation, a bug bounty program in which vulnerabilities contained by such technology are identified and reported by hackers would also be established. The senators emphasized that the participating hackers would be pre-screened and compensated for their discovery of vulnerabilities. This article continues to discuss the purpose and requirements of the Hack Your State Department Act.

    MeriTalk reports "Hack Your State Department Act Introduced in Senate"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Eliminating Infamous Security Threats"

    A new solution to speculative memory side-channel attacks such as Meltdown and Spectre has been proposed by researchers from Uppsala University, NTNU, and the University of Murcia. The security vulnerability used to execute speculative memory side-channel attacks derive from the prediction of future instructions by high-performance microprocessors. Misspeculations leave traces of information behind that could be exploited by such attacks to retrieve sensitive information. Unlike previous security solutions to these attacks, the new solution increases security without sacrificing the performance that users demand of their computer systems. This article continues to discuss speculative memory side-channel attacks and the new method to address these attacks.

    EurekAlert! reports "Eliminating Infamous Security Threats"

  • news

    Visible to the public "New Cyber Protection Technology Moves from the Lab to the Marketplace"

    The MIT Lincoln Laboratory developed technology aimed at providing protection for commodity software applications such as browsers, business tools, and document readers, from cyberattacks. The technology, called Timely Randomization Applied to Commodity Executables at Runtime (TRACER), protects such applications from sophisticated cyberattacks by re-randomizing the applications' sensitive internal data and layout each time an output is generated. The transition of TRACER to a commercially available product is supported by the Science and Technology Directorate's (S&T) Transition to Practice (TTP) program, which identifies promising federally developed cybersecurity technologies that could be accelerated into the marketplace and facilitates transition. This article continues to discuss TRACER and its move to the marketplace.

    MIT Lincoln Laboratory reports "New Cyber Protection Technology Moves from the Lab to the Marketplace"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Quantum – a Double-Edged Sword for Cryptography"

    Quantum computers are expected to lead to highly secure cryptography. However, these computers are also expected to break current encryption algorithms as a result of their quantum-mechanical properties that could allow them to calculate at a much faster rate than regular computers. Sensitive data can be exposed through the use of quantum computers, posing a significant threat to the privacy of data within the government, medical industry, financial industry, and more. This article continues to discuss how quantum computers pose a threat to the security of modern communications, the concept of quantum key distribution (QKD), and the improvement of quantum random-number generators.

    Homeland Security News Wire reports "Quantum - a Double-Edged Sword for Cryptography"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Researchers Develop app to Detect Twitter Bots in any Language"

    Language scholars and machine learning specialists collaborated to create a new application that can detect Twitter bots independent of the language used. Bots are non-personal and automated accounts that post content to online social networks. The popularity of Twitter as an instrument in public debate has led to a situation in which it has become an ideal target of spammers and automated scripts. Bots are being used to spread fake news.

    HELP NET SECURITY reports: "Researchers Develop app to Detect Twitter Bots in any Language"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Max-Severity Bug in Infusion Pump Gateway Puts Lives at Risk"

    The Alaris Gateway Workstation is widely used in hospitals for medical infusion pumps. Infusion pumps are powered, monitored, and controlled via Alaris Gateway Workstations. Attacks on infusion pumps pose a significant threat to safety as these devices are used to deliver doses of medicine directly to patients. Researchers at CyberMDX, a healthcare security firm, discovered two vulnerabilities in the workstation, one of which has been rated high in severity. These vulnerabilities could be exploited by hackers to perform malicious activities such as altering drug doses and stopping the administration of drugs. This article continues to discuss the exploitation and mitigation of vulnerabilities contained by the Alaris Gateway Workstation, as well as the challenges faced by hospitals in regard to securing connected medical devices.

    Threatpost reports "Max-Severity Bug in Infusion Pump Gateway Puts Lives at Risk"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Better Cybersecurity Research Requires More Data Sharing"

    Security researchers from the University of Tulsa gave a presentation at the annual Workshop on the Economics of Information Security (WEIS) conference in which they emphasized the importance of sharing datasets among researchers in order to improve cybersecurity research. The identification of cybersecurity trends rely on the analysis of data pertaining to security incidents, breaches, the techniques used by attackers, and more. According to researchers, this type of the data is often unavailable to the public or inadequate. This article continues to discuss the importance of data in cybersecurity research and the lack of data sharing within the research community.

    Dark Reading reports "Better Cybersecurity Research Requires More Data Sharing"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Human Error Still the Cause of Many Data Breaches"

    With the incidence of reported data breaches on the rise, it was discovered that 53 percent of C-suite executives, and nearly three in ten (28%) of small business owners who suffered a breach was caused by human error or accidental loss by an external vendor/source. Employee training is critical, in order to decrease the amount of breaches that occur, that are caused by human error.

    HELP NET SECURITY reports: "Human Error Still the Cause of Many Data Breaches"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Most US Mobile Banking Apps Have Security and Privacy Flaws, Researchers Say"

    A new study conducted by researchers at Zimperium has brought further attention to the insecurity of U.S. bank apps. According to findings of the study, most of the top banking apps have security and privacy issues. The vulnerabilities contained by these apps could lead to data leaks, posing a significant threat to the privacy and security of users' sensitive data and communications. Researchers have highlighted that these flaws derive from poor coding practices and the use of inadequately maintained open-source libraries. This article continues to discuss key findings of the study in relation to the security and privacy flaws contained by most U.S. mobile baking apps.

    TechCrunch reports "Most US Mobile Banking Apps Have Security and Privacy Flaws, Researchers Say"

  • news

    Visible to the public "How 5G Introduces New Security Vulnerabilities"

    The arrival of 5G networks is expected to introduce new security vulnerabilities. Enterprises are encouraged to think about the possibility of new security vulnerabilities in the implementation of 5G as this next-generation mobile communication standard comes with reduced latency and a boost in bandwidth, increasing the number of users and devices. This article continues to discuss findings revealed by Gartner about the deployment of 5G in 2020, what 5G requires of enterprises in regard to infrastructure, 5G authentication, the security challenges posed by 5G, and the multi-level approach that should be adopted by enterprises to secure the next-generation of mobile networks.

    Information Age reports "How 5G Introduces New Security Vulnerabilities"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Rowhammer Variant RAMBleed Allows Attackers to Steal Secrets from RAM"

    A new variant of the Rowhammer attack, called RAMBleed, has been detailed by a team of researchers. Rowhammer is a technique that causes electromagnetic leakage in memory and triggers bit flips, which leads to privilege escalation. Error-correcting code (ECC) memory can be used to mitigate Rowhammer attacks. The RAMBleed attack uses Rowhammer as read-side channel to read sensitive data stored in memory without the need to persistently flip bits in the memory space, allowing attackers to circumvent ECC protection. This article continues to discuss Rowhammer attacks and the research behind the new RAMBleed side-channel attack.

    Security Week reports "Rowhammer Variant RAMBleed Allows Attackers to Steal Secrets from RAM"

  • news

    Visible to the public "FIN8 Group Returns, Targeting PoS Devices With Malware"

    The financially-motivated hacking group, FIN8, has returned after a two-year hiatus. According to researchers from Morphisec, the FIN8 group is now mainly targeting point-of-sale (PoS) systems used within the hotel industry. Customized malware, called ShellTea, is being installed on PoS systems via a spear-phishing campaign in order to steal payment information and other financial data. Many of the PoS machines being used by companies in the hotel industry have been found to be using older versions of Microsoft Windows 7, which increases their vulnerability to such attacks. This article continues to discuss the FIN8 hacking group in relation to its techniques, targets, and connections to other groups.

    ISMG Network reports "FIN8 Group Returns, Targeting PoS Devices With Malware"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Hackers Have Carried out 12 Billion Attacks Against Gaming Web Sites in 17 Months"

    Findings shared by a new report released by Akamai indicate that the gaming industry is becoming one of the most favorable targets for hackers. According to the report, a significant number of credential stuffing attacks were launched against gaming websites over the last 17 months. Credential stuffing is a type of cyberattack in which usernames and passwords obtained from previous data breaches are used to gain access to accounts on other sites. This article continues to discuss the increased targeting of the gaming community by credential stuffing attacks and other key findings revealed by Akamai's new report in relation to other types of cyberattacks.

    VentureBeat "Hackers Have Carried out 12 Billion Attacks Against Gaming Web Sites in 17 Months"

  • news

    Visible to the public "The Next Big Privacy Hurdle? Teaching AI to Forget"

    The General Data Regulation (GDPR) introduced the "right to be forgotten", which empowers individuals to request that their personal data is erased. The enactment of this regulation has sparked debates about the collection, storage, and usage of data, as well as the level of control the public should have over their personal data. One aspect that is often overlooked in the discussion of digital privacy is the control of data once it is fed into artificial intelligence (AI) and machine-learning algorithms. Recommendation engines such as those that suggest videos, purchases, and more, use AI trained on customer or user data. The question arises as to how AI can be taught to forget data. This article continues to discuss AI systems' inability to forget data and how this poses a threat to privacy.

    Wired reports "The Next Big Privacy Hurdle? Teaching AI to Forget"

  • news

    Visible to the public "New RCE Vulnerability Impacts Nearly Half of the Internet's Email Servers"

    Security researchers from Qualys discovered a critical remote command execution (RCE) security vulnerability that affects most of the Internet's email servers. According to researchers, the vulnerability impacts the mail transfer agent (MTA), Exim, which is ran by 57% percent of all email servers connected to the Internet. The exploitation of this RCE flaw could allow a local or remote attacker to execute commands with root privileges on an Exim server. This article continues to discuss the RCE vulnerability in relation to its exploitation and impact, as well as the accidental patching of the vulnerability.

    ZDNet reports "New RCE Vulnerability Impacts Nearly Half of the Internet's Email Servers"

  • news

    Visible to the public "How Human Bias Impacts Cybersecurity Decision Making"

    Psychologist and Principal Research Scientist at Forecepoint, Dr. Margaret Cunningham, conducted a study in which she examined the impacts of six different unconscious human biases on decision-making in cybersecurity. Awareness and understanding surrounding cognitive biases in the realm of cybersecurity should be increased in order to reduce biased decision-making in the performance of activities such as threat analysis and prevent the design of systems that perpetuate biases. The biases examined by Dr. Cunningham include aggregate bias, anchoring bias, confirmation bias, and more. This article continues to discuss the influence of cognitive biases on cybersecurity decision-making and how to overcome them.

    Help Net Security reports "How Human Bias Impacts Cybersecurity Decision Making"

  • news

    Visible to the public  "Hackproofing Smart Meters"

    An automated program that will help increase the protection of smart electricity meters and the smart grid against hacking has been developed by cybersecurity researchers from the University of British Columbia. Smart electricity meters are devices used by electric utility companies to track and record the consumption of energy. Since smart electricity meters are connected to a smart grid, improving the security of these devices would lead to stronger security for the grid. The program analyzes the design and code of smart meters in order to detect vulnerabilities and discover potential attacks. This article continues to discuss the use of smart electricity meters, the potential risks posed by hacked meters, and the program developed to improve security of these devices.

    Science Daily reports "Hackproofing Smart Meters"

  • news

    Visible to the public "FBI Issues Warning on 'Secure' Websites Used For Phishing"

    The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has issued a warning pertaining to the use of TLS-secured websites by malicious actors for the performance of phishing attacks. The warning brings further attention to the false sense of security given to users by the presence of "https" and a green padlock symbol in a browser's address bar. This article continues to discuss the warning recently issued by the FBI in relation to the use of TLS-secured websites in phishing campaigns, along with recent discoveries surrounding the abuse of cloud companies' TLS certificates and recommendations to users on how to avoid being deceived by HTTPS-secured phishing landing pages.

    Bleeping Computer reports "FBI Issues Warning on 'Secure' Websites Used For Phishing"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Hackers Hid Malware in a Fake Trading App to Steal Your Cryptocurrency"

    A fraudulent cryptocurrency trading website has been discovered by security researchers. According to security researchers, the fake website was modeled after the cryptocurrency trading platform, Cryptohopper. The imitation Cryptohopper website contains a Trojan that could allow personal information to be stolen, clipboards to be hijacked, and unsuspecting victims' systems to be used for cryptocurrency mining. Through the use of this malware, browser cookies, login credentials, two-factor authentication data, and more, could be stolen by hackers. This article continues to discuss the discoveries made by researchers in relation to the fake cryptoccurrency trading website.

    TNW reports "Hackers Hid Malware in a Fake Trading App to Steal Your Cryptocurrency"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Microsoft Wants More Security Researchers to Hack Into Its Cloud"

    Microsoft seeks to improve the security of its cloud computing service, Azure, as the company is encouraging security researchers to probe the cloud service for vulnerabilities. White Hat hackers are being asked to find flaws in Azure for Microsoft to fix before they are exploited by malicious hackers. Bolstering the security of this cloud computing service is important as the adoption of cloud services is expected to grow, along with the introduction of opportunities and challenges. Efforts are being made by Microsoft to ensure that security researchers are legally safe to report vulnerabilities. This article continues to discuss what is being done by Microsoft to improve the security of its cloud service.

    Bloomberg reports "Microsoft Wants More Security Researchers to Hack Into Its Cloud"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Is there a weak link in blockchain security?"

    Recent research revealed that blockchain is set to become ubiquitous by 2025. Blockchain technology is set to provide greater transparency, traceability and immutability, allowing people and organizations to share data without having to be concerned about security. Although, blockchain helps with sharing of data safely, it is only as strong as its weakest link. There are still risks surrounding it that organizations must be aware of, and mitigate, prior to implementation.

    HELP NET SECURITY reports: "Is there a weak link in blockchain security?"

  • news

    Visible to the public "What’s the Best Approach to Patching Vulnerabilities?"

    A team of researchers from Cyentia, Virginia Tech, and RAND Corporation recently presented a paper, titled Improving Vulnerability Remediation Through Better Exploit Prediction, in which they discuss their study on strategies for the prioritization of vulnerabilities. The strategies examined in this research include using the CVSS (Common Vulnerability Scoring System) score, patching bugs with known exploits, and patching bugs with specific tags. A machine learning model was created for each strategy in order to compare the performance of the strategies against rules-based approaches. This article continues to discuss the study in relation to how it was conducted and its findings.

    Naked Security reports "What's the Best Approach to Patching Vulnerabilities?"

  • news

    Visible to the public "UTSA Develops First Cyber Agility Framework to Measure Network Protection over Time"

    Researchers at the University of Texas at San Antonio developed a quantifiable framework that can be used to measure the agility of cyber attackers and defenders. Through the use of this framework, cyberattacks such as those launched by the major cyber crime group, GozNym, can quickly be discovered and addressed. The cyber agility framework will help cyber professionals as it allows responses to cyberattacks to be tested. Government and industry organizations will be able to better visualize the effectiveness of their defense techniques against cyberattacks. The Army Research Office funded the development of this framework. This article continues to discuss the importance of quantifying cybersecurity as well as the concept, research, development, and support behind the cyber agility framework.

    UTSA reports "UTSA Develops First Cyber Agility Framework to Measure Network Protection over Time"

  • news

    Visible to the public "DiMe: Calling All Who Serve in Digital Medicine"

    The growing connectivity of medical devices increases security risks. Collaboration among professionals in different fields is important in the strengthening of medical device security. Technologists, data scientists, clinicians, security researchers, and more, should work together to bring more secure medical devices to the market. A professional organization, called Digital Medicine Society (DiMe) has been launched in support of this collaboration. This article continues to discuss the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration and efforts to improve the security of connected medical devices.

    STAT reports "DiMe: Calling All Who Serve in Digital Medicine"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Will Biometrics Replace Passwords For Online Payment Authentication?"

    In a study it was discovered that over half of consumers in the UK (53 percent) are worried that the shift to biometrics to authenticate online payments will dramatically increase the amount of identity fraud. The study also discovered that, two thirds (68 percent) of consumers worry about being able to pay for goods or services without being asked for a password, and only 40 percent believe that biometrics are more secure than other authentication methods.

    HELP NET SECURITY reports: "Will Biometrics Replace Passwords For Online Payment Authentication?"]

  • news

    Visible to the public "Malboard: New Computer Attack Mimics User’s Keystroke Characteristics, and Evades Detection"

    Researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev's (BGU) Malware Lab developed a new user keystroke impersonation attack, called Malboard, to demonstrate the possibility of users' keystrokes being mimicked by attackers and the prevention of detecting malicious keystrokes. Malboard is capable of circumventing detection mechanisms used for the verification of user identities based on behavioral patterns with respect to keystrokes. The behavioral authentication systems that this attack was tested against include KeyTrac, TypingDNA, and DuckHunt. The keyboards used to demonstrate this attack are developed by Microsoft, Lenovo, and Dell. This article continues to discuss the concept and research behind the Malboard attack, as well as the new detection modules proposed by researchers and the expansion of this study.

    BGU reports "Malboard: New Computer Attack Mimics User's Keystroke Characteristics, and Evades Detection"

  • news

    Visible to the public "2018 in Numbers: Data Breaches Cost $654 Billion, Expose 2.8 Billion Data Records in the U.S."

    According to ForgeRock's U.S. Consumer Data Breach Report, 2.8 billion consumer data records were exposed in 2018, which costs U.S. organizations more than $654 billion. Although investments in information security products and services have increased, organizations continue to face cyberattacks in which cybercriminals seek to gain access to sensitive data. The report highlights that personally identifiable information was the most targeted type of data in 2018. Healthcare, financial services, and government were also cited as the most impacted sectors by cyberattacks between January 1, 2018 and March 31, 2019. This article continues to discuss key findings of the report in relation to the types of data exposed in recent breaches, the most frequent attack methods, and the most impacted sectors, along with what organizations can do to protect consumer data.

    Help Net Security reports "2018 in Numbers: Data Breaches Cost $654 Billion, Expose 2.8 Billion Data Records in the U.S."

  • news

    Visible to the public "What the Baltimore Ransomware Attack Means for Incident Response Communications"

    Baltimore has yet to recover from a ransomware attack, which has disrupted resident activities such as paying utility bills, obtaining business licenses, selling homes, and more. Government email accounts and city business functions are still not able to be used and conducted by city workers. A lesson to be learned from the Baltimore ransomware attack is the importance of establishing alternative secure means for communication in order to coordinate incident response during a cyberattack. This article continues to discuss the impact of the ransomware attack on Baltimore, the lack of communication during the ransomware attack, the increased launch of ransomware attacks on cities, and the importance of having secure communications channels in the process of responding to cyber incidents.

    Security Boulevard reports "What the Baltimore Ransomware Attack Means for Incident Response Communications"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Organizations Still Struggle to Manage Vulnerability Patches, Report"

    The results of a survey conducted by Tripwire to which 340 information security professionals responded, further highlight that many companies still fall short in the management of vulnerability patches. In addition, there is an insufficient visibility into the attack surface. While the majority of respondents said that their organizations run vulnerability scans, the performance of such scans was found to be infrequent. If vulnerability scans are not frequently performed, new vulnerabilities will be overlooked and assets connected to an organization's network may be inadequately managed. Half of the respondents also stated that their organizations only have enough bandwidth to focus on vulnerabilities considered to be highly severe. This article continues to discuss key findings of the survey in relation to vulnerability management trends.

    SC Media reports "Organizations Still Struggle to Manage Vulnerability Patches, Report"

  • news

    Visible to the public Adware Hidden in Android Apps Downloaded More Than 440 Million Times

    In a study, it was discovered that 238 applications in Google Play hid BeiTaAd, a well-obfuscated ad plugin that could display ads on the device's lock screen, trigger video and audio advertisements while the phone is asleep, and display ads outside the app that interfered with the user experience in other applications. The 238 different applications were downloaded more than 440 million times. The research report states that as of May 23, 2019, all affected apps had been either removed from Google Play or updated to versions that do not contain BeiTaAd.

    Dark Reading reports: "Adware Hidden in Android Apps Downloaded More Than 440 Million Times"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Email Still a Major Attack Vector: Security Research"

    Email remains one of the main attack vectors used by cybercriminals. Key findings from different research reports, including those released by Mimecast, Proofpoint, Rapid7, Vade Secure, and more, have been highlighted by eSecurityPlanet. According to Mimecast's State of Email Security report, impersonation attacks performed via email have increased as 73 percent of organizations have stated that they have experienced loss as a result of such attacks. Rapid7's first quarter 2019 threat report has also brought further attention to the increased use of fake login pages for Microsoft Office 365, Exchange, and Onedrive, which victims have been redirected to via phishing attacks. This article continues to discuss recent key findings shared by multiple reports in relation to email security.

    eSecurityPlanet reports "Email Still a Major Attack Vector: Security Research"

  • news

    Visible to the public "ARCHANGEL: Securing National Archives with AI and Blockchain"

    Researchers at the University of Surrey have developed state-of-the-art artificial intelligence (AI) technologies and a blockchain aimed at bolstering security for digital government records of national archives. The system, called ARCHANGEL, combines AI and blockchain technologies to help the U.K., Australia, the U.S., and more, protect their digital public archives against accidental modifications or tampering. ARCHANGEL uses blockchain technology and neural networks to create a fingerprint for each archived document, allowing the authenticity of such records to be verified. This article continues to discuss the concept, development, and research behind ARCHANGEL.

    Homeland Security News Wire reports "ARCHANGEL: Securing National Archives with AI and Blockchain"

  • news

    Visible to the public "The Growing Importance of Bio-Cybersecurity"

    Healthcare systems are offering DNA sequencing as a result of the increased demand for genetic screening by patients. However, as the performance of DNA sequencing grows, the security of patients' genetic data needs to be taken more seriously by healthcare cybersecurity professionals. National security threats of biological warfare and mass surveillance programs call for the strengthening of security in regard to patients' genetic information. Hackers may steal DNA data to perform malicious activities such as blackmail and identity theft. Researchers from the University of Washington found that the DNA data process pipelines of widely used open-source programs by DNA test companies are highly vulnerable to being hacked. The use of blockchain technology has been cited as a way in which such data can be secured. This article continues to discuss the importance of bio-cybersecurity and how blockchain technology can help to protect genetic data.

    CPO Magazine reports "The Growing Importance of Bio-Cybersecurity"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Is AI fundamental to the future of cybersecurity?"

    Most security professionals agree that AI Solutions must be implemented to keep an organization safe of cyberattacks. In a study conducted, it was discovered that 69 percent of security professionals are looking to implement AI security solutions in the next five years, with 44 percent of security professionals planning to invest in AI/ML defense in the immediate future. Seventy-six percent of respondents agreed that AI has the capacity to improve the efficiency of their day-to-day jobs. Eighty-one percent said that AI will be able to improve the security posture of their organizations. Even though most security professionals think AI solutions are important the adoption of AI solutions is a slow 4 percent. The reason for the slow adoption, is due to AI's marketing hype as a barrier, and professionals have also been hesitant to adopt it simply on the basis they haven't used AI before.

    HELP NET SECURITY reports: "Is AI fundamental to the future of cybersecurity?"

  • news

    Visible to the public "93% of Companies Are Overconfident of Their Ability to Stop Data Breaches"

    A report released by Certify and Techvangelism shows that most companies have great confidence in their ability to defeat data breaches. However, almost 80% of these companies lack approaches to combatting privileged access management (PAM) cyberattacks. Findings of the report emphasize that it is important for organizations to continue their efforts to increase the security of their critical infrastructure and data. Organizations must adopt privileged access management of higher maturity in order to handle threats involving privileged credentials. This article continues to discuss findings shared in the report in pertinence to companies' overconfidence in their ability to stop data breaches, along with their security measures against data breaches and questionable privileged access controls.

    Infosecurity Magazine reports "93% of Companies Are Overconfident of Their Ability to Stop Data Breaches"