News Items

  • news

    Visible to the public "LinkedIn Data Found in Unsecured Databases"

    LinkedIn used eight unsecured databases which held approximately 60 million records of LinkedIn user information. The unsecured data contained: LinkedIn profile information, including IDs, profile URLs, work history, education history, location, listed skills, other social profiles, the last time the profile was updated, and email address when the LinkedIn account was created. LinkedIn investigated the issue and concluded that a third-party company exposed a set of data aggregated from LinkedIn public profiles, as well as other, non-LinkedIn sources. LinkedIn has no indication that there has been a breach. Amazon, who was hosting the databases was notified, and as of April 15, 2019, the databases were secured and were no longer accessible via the internet.

    Infosecurity reports: "LinkedIn Data Found in Unsecured Databases"

  • news

    Visible to the public "6 Takeaways from Ransomware Attacks in Q1"

    Although there has been a decrease in the number of ransomware attacks, the intensity of such attacks have grown in that ransom payments are higher, downtime loss is greater, and the recovery time is longer. According to a new report released by Coverware in which the findings of a study on ransomware attacks in the first quarter of 2019 are presented, victims are being demanded to pay more, ransomware attacks are becoming less automated, manufacturing companies have become a more attractive target for ransomware attacks, downtime caused by ransomware is increasing, and more. In order for organizations to defend against ransomware attacks, multiple layers of security in addition to access restriction and backups must be implemented. This article continues to discuss six trends observed from ransomware attacks launched so far in 2019.

    Dark Reading reports "6 Takeaways from Ransomware Attacks in Q1"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Security Culture Questions to Consider"

    In order for enterprises to more effectively mitigate cybersecurity weaknesses, a security culture must be fostered within the workplace through the use of tools, training, and other technology aids. Enterprise security culture is an essential part of risk management. There are three questions that security and technology leaders should consider in the pursuit towards an enhanced security culture, which touch on how employees value security, why employees should care about security, and leadership. This article continues to discuss the importance of improving enterprise security culture and three questions that security leaders need to consider in the assessment of this culture within their organizations.

    GovTech reports "Security Culture Questions to Consider"

  • news

    Visible to the public "How an Annual ‘Cyber Shield’ Drill Helps the National Guard Secure Elections"

    Cyber Shield is an Army National Guard exercise aimed at testing and enhancing the cyber incident-response capabilities of the Guard. Participants of this year's exercise include National Guard units from 40 states, those working in the private sector, and people from federal agencies such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and National Security Agency (NSA). The ability to detect suspicious activity on a network and lock down unauthorized access to a system is tested in this exercise. This article continues to discuss the growth, participants, and aim of the National Gaurd's Cyber Shield, along with how this exercise helps election security.

    CyberScoop reports "How an Annual 'Cyber Shield' Drill Helps the National Guard Secure Elections"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Microsoft email breach gave hackers access to account information for months"

    Microsoft has been affected by a data breach involving attackers leveraging a customer support account to access customers' email information. Microsoft-managed email services such as @Outlook.com, @MSN.com and @Hotmail.com were affected by the breach. Microsoft notified users that hackers may have been able to access information about their accounts including: their email address, email subject lines, and frequent contacts. Microsoft reports that the contents of any messages or attachments were not able to be seen. This breach has been occurring from January 1 through March 28 of this year, but could have been occurring for six months. Once the breach was discovered, Microsoft immediately disabled the compromised credentials, prohibiting their use for any further unauthorized access.

    CyberScoop reports: "Microsoft email breach gave hackers access to account information for months"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Cybercriminals Attack Cloud Server Honeypot Within 52 Seconds"

    A report recently released by Sophos, titled "Exposed: Cyberattacks on Cloud Honeypots", highlights the speed at which a cloud server honeypot was attacked by cybercriminals, the average number of attempted attacks on cloud servers per minute, and more. According to the report, cybercriminals attacked one of Sophos' cloud server honeypots within 52 seconds of it going live. This article continues to discuss findings of Sophos' study of 10 cloud server honeypots in relation to the speed and scale of attacks on these honeypots, and the importance of constant visibility of public cloud infrastructure.

    Back End News report "Cybercriminals Attack Cloud Server Honeypot Within 52 Seconds"

  • news

    Visible to the public "DevSecOps: Fast Development Without Sacrificing Safety"

    DevOps is a set of practices that have been increasingly adopted by organizations to increase the speed at which software is developed and delivered. However, organizations are encouraged to adopt DevSecOps in which security is considered at every stage of the software delivery lifecycle. This article continues to discuss the adoption of DevOps by organizations, how organizations can transition from DevOps to DevSecOps, the challenges posed by cloud computing, and the adoption of tools that provide real-time visibility into potential attacks at the application layer.

    Help Net Security "DevSecOps: Fast Development Without Sacrificing Safety"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Cyberspies Hijacked the Internet Domains of Entire Countries"

    A hacker group, called Sea Turtle, has been discovered by researchers at Cisco's Talos security devision to be carrying out an espionage campaign primarily targeting government organizations in the Middle East and North Africa, including intelligence agencies, ministries of foreign affairs, and more, to gain access to sensitive networks. The espionage campaign was launched through the performance of DNS hijacking and impacted 40 different organizations in 13 countries. This article continues to discuss the Sea Turtle espionage campaign in relation to its targets and performance of DNS hijacking, as well as the growing popularity of DNS hijacking among hackers and a possible solution to DNS hijacking.

    Wired reports "Cyberspies Hijacked the Internet Domains of Entire Countries"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Malvertising Campaign Abducts Half a Billion Chrome on iOS Sessions to Push Fake Ads"

    Confidant, an IT security firm, recently published a blog post in which the details of a malvertising campaign, dubbed eGobbler, are presented. According to researchers, eGobbler, abused a vulnerability in Chrome for iOS. Through the exploitation of this vulnerability, hackers were able to push fake advertisements to 500 million user sessions as well as hijack sessions. This article continues to discuss the eGobbler malvertising campaign in relation to its targets, techniques, and discovery by researchers, along with the need to create an industry safeguard against malvertising.

    SC Media reports "Malvertising Campaign Abducts Half a Billion Chrome on iOS Sessions to Push Fake Ads"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Army Researchers Identify New Way to Improve Cybersecurity"

    Cyberattacks pose a significant threat to the security and privacy of individuals, government agencies, and businesses, making cybersecurity one of the biggest concerns of the nation. A new way in which network security can be improved has been identified by researchers at the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command's Army Research Laboratory and Towson University. Researchers have developed a strategy to compress network traffic without negatively impacting the ability of analysts to discover and investigate malicious activity in a network. This article continues to discuss how this strategy will help improve upon network security, the expected advancement of this technique, and the future of intrusion detection.

    ECN Magazine reports "Army Researchers Identify New Way to Improve Cybersecurity"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Cloud Security Spending Set to Top $12bn by 2023"

    A greater amount of companies are starting to use cloud services. Organizations spent $178 billion on public cloud services last year, and the amount of money spent on public cloud services is expected to grow to $236 billion by 2020. Global spending on cloud security is set to grow nearly 18% to reach $12.7 billion by 2023, with protection for public cloud deployments prioritized over the coming years. Since more and more companies are using cloud services, it is becoming more important to protect mission critical systems and sensitive data on the cloud.

    Infosecurity reports: "Cloud Security Spending Set to Top $12bn by 2023"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Hackers Could Read Your Hotmail, MSN, and Outlook Emails by Abusing Microsoft Support"

    Microsoft has confirmed that some of its email service users were the targets of an attack sometime between January 1st and March 28th. Hackers were able to access the contents of users' email accounts through the abuse of Microsoft's customer support portal. Information such as the subject lines of users' emails, who users have communicated with, and more, were accessed by hackers. This article continues to discuss the details of this incident and how Microsoft responded.

    Motherboard reports "Hackers Could Read Your Hotmail, MSN, and Outlook Emails by Abusing Microsoft Support"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Researchers in Singapore Demonstrate New Quantum Key Distribution Technique over Singtel's Fibre Network"

    A breakthrough in quantum key distribution (QKD) has been made by a team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) and Singtel, Asia's leading communications group. QKD differs from traditional encryption in that it is uses the laws of physics to protect the transport of keys between communicating parties. The new method demonstrated by researchers to bolster QKD, shows that QKD can be used over commercial fiber networks. This article continues to discuss the concept of QKD, the new technique developed by researchers to advance QKD, and what this advancement in QKD indicates.

    ZDNet reports "Researchers in Singapore Demonstrate New Quantum Key Distribution Technique over Singtel's Fibre Network"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Experts Explore Mystery of Security Metrics"

    The AFCEA Cyber Committee explored the area of security metrics by surveying and interviewing organizations with cybersecurity programs. The results from these surveys and interviews further highlight that measuring the adequacy of cybersecurity protections remains a challenge. Results showed that organizations still struggle to determine metrics for measuring security posture. Organizations also find it difficult to communicate their state of security to boards of directors or senior executives. This article continues to discuss the exploration of security metrics by the AFCEA Cyber Committee and key findings of this examination in relation to the challenges associated with security metrics, the existence of security metrics guidance, and organizations' efforts in security metrics.

    SIGNAL Magazine reports "Experts Explore Mystery of Security Metrics"

  • news

    Visible to the public "New Attacks (and Old Attacks Made New)"

    In todays world new malware and zero-day attacks are reasonably rare and are vastly outnumbered by reconfigured malware and the regular return of old attacks. It is important to be prepared for the new attacks, however it is also very important to not to forget about old attacks, since they happen more regularly.

    DARKReading reports: "New Attacks (and Old Attacks Made New)"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Aftershock-3PC: Polymorphic Malware Attack on 200+ Premium Publishers"

    A new form of malware targeting ad networks, called AfterShock-3PC, is said to have been designed to circumvent signature-based detection in that it continuously alters its identifiable features. According to the Digital Security and Operations (DSO) team at the ad verification firm, The Media Trust, AfterShock-3PC has already attacked more than 200 premium publishers. This article continues to discuss the capabilities, targets, and supposed perpetrators behind AfterShock-3PC, as well as the analysis of this malware and the rise in adaptive attacks.

    The Media Trust reports "Aftershock-3PC: Polymorphic Malware Attack on 200+ Premium Publishers"

  • news

    Visible to the public "TicTocTrack Smartwatch Flaws Can Be Abused to Track Kids"

    Researchers at Pen Test Partners have uncovered vulnerabilities contained by a popular Australian smartwatch for kids, called TicTocTrack. Parents can track the location of their children via the smartwatch. According to researchers, the vulnerabilities discovered in the watch could be exploited by hackers to perform malicious activities such as track the location of children, spoof locations, call children, and more. This article continues to discuss where these security flaws stem from, what their exploitation could allow attackers to do, and the response to the discovery of these vulnerabilities.

    Threatpost reports "TicTocTrack Smartwatch Flaws Can Be Abused to Track Kids"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Privacy 'Poisoning' Poses Threat to Companies Using Blockchain"

    Blockchain technology can be made unusable through the launch of a privacy poisoning attack. A privacy poisoning attack is a new kind of cyberattack that can be performed by loading private data such as names, home addresses, credit card numbers, and more, into the blockchain. This attack can also be performed through the loading of illegal material into the blockchain. An affected chain would be unusable due to conflicts with privacy laws such as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This article continues to discuss the increased interest surrounding the use of blockchain technology, the concept of privacy poisoning attacks, the rise in blockchain poisoning, and the potential impact of such attacks on the implementation of blockchain technology by organizations.

    Phys.org reports "Privacy 'Poisoning' Poses Threat to Companies Using Blockchain"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Cyber security – should your business be worried?"

    Every business no matter how big or small relies on computers and digitalization to perform their basic functions. If a company is breached, then it can cost a lot of money for the company to fix and mitigate the affect of the attacks. Every company, no matter how big or small, should take cybersecurity seriously. Many cybercrimes are result of human error, usually an employee causes the breach of information, so business owners should generate awareness and educate staff around security best practices. A business should also have a cyber security and disaster recovery strategy.

    BuisnessMattersMagazine reports: "Cyber security - should your business be worried?"

  • news

    Visible to the public ARCH 2019 Best Result Award

    The ARCH 2019 Best Result Award goes to Fabian Immler for his verification tool Isabelle/HOL-ODE-Numerics. The award comes with a 650 Euro prize sponsored by Bosch. Since Fabian couldn't be at the ceremony, Matthias Althoff accepted the certificate on his behalf, from Arne Hamann of Bosch.

  • news

    Visible to the public "DHS Alerts Industry to Insecure Enterprise VPN Apps"

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) recently issued an alert to the public pertaining to the presence of a vulnerability in virtual private network (VPN) applications made by Cisco, F5 Networks, Palo Alto Networks, and Pulse Secure. According to the warning released by DHS, the exploitation of this vulnerability could allow hackers to access other applications running on a VPN connection. This article continues to discuss the security flaw in relation to where it comes from, which VPN apps it affects, what it could allow hackers to do, along with VPN vendors' responses to this vulnerability.

    CyberScoop reports "DHS Alerts Industry to Insecure Enterprise VPN Apps"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Report: Healthcare Is No. 1 - For Breaches"

    Healthcare organizations are ranked number one when it comes to being affected by breaches. Once an attacker gained access to a device or an account, the most common next steps were accessing an Office 365 account (34 percent); roaming the network to find available data (30 percent); installing ransomware (12 percent); and obtaining a wire transfer to an attacker's account (8 percent). Cybersecurity needs to be a priority to healthcare organizations.

    Govinfosecurity reports: "Report: Healthcare Is No. 1 - For Breaches"

  • news

    Visible to the public "The Cybersecurity Workforce Shortage Is a Big Problem. You Can Help Girl Scouts Solve It."

    In support of closing the cybersecurity workforce gap, the Girl Scouts launched a program aimed at strengthening the cybersecurity skills of young girls. Within the first six months of the program, 44,000 cybersecurity badges were earned by girls in kindergarten through fifth grade. The program encourages girls to explore career paths in the field of cybersecurity and other STEM fields. The cybersecurity skills of young girls should be cultivated in order to diversify and increase the number of skilled cyber professionals in the cybersecurity workforce. This article continues to discuss the importance of addressing the cybersecurity workforce shortage, the cybersecurity curriculum launched by the Girl Scouts, and how others can get involved in this initiative.

    Security Boulevard reports "The Cybersecurity Workforce Shortage Is a Big Problem. You Can Help Girl Scouts Solve It."

  • news

    Visible to the public "Building Biologically-Inspired Software"

    Engineers in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of South Florida have developed new network protection software that is based on the human immune system. Researchers looked at the mechanisms of human immune system to see how they could be applied in the performance of intrusion detection in wireless sensor networks. The biologically-inspired software developed by researchers can identify and eliminate threats facing a network when it is at risk of being attacked, much like the immune system when the human body becomes infected. This article continues to discuss the inspiration, research, and development behind the biologically-inspired cybersecurity software.

    USF News report "Building Biologically-Inspired Software"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Popular Video and Sound Editing Website VSDC Hacked to Propagate Banking Trojans"

    Security researchers at Doctor Web discovered the compromise of the popular video editing website, VSDC, by hackers. Download links on the VSDC website were hijacked in order to infect the video editing website with a banking Trojan (Win32.Bolik.2) and information stealer (Trojan.PWS.Stealer). One Trojan steals information from browsers, messengers, and more. This article continues to discuss the hacking of VSDC to distribute banking Trojans, and past discoveries surrounding the insufficient security of the VSDC website.

    Computing reports "Popular Video and Sound Editing Website VSDC Hacked to Propagate Banking Trojans"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Majority of Organizations Lack a Cybersecurity Incident Response Plan"

    Findings of a study on cyber resilience by IBM Security and the Ponemon Institute indicate that the majority of organizations do not have a cybersecurity incident response plan in place in the event that a cyber incident occurs. The implementation of cybersecurity incident response plans can increase the speed at which organizations respond to cyberattacks and reduce the costs of those cyberattacks. This article continues to discuss findings of the study in regard to the absence or inadequate testing of cybersecurity incident response plans in organizations and the importance of such plans.

    MeriTalk reports "Majority of Organizations Lack a Cybersecurity Incident Response Plan"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Majority of Hotel Websites Leak Guest Booking Info"

    New research conducted by Symantec reveals the leakage of detailed guest booking data by the majority of hotels to third-party advertisers, social media websites, and more. This data includes information such as names, addresses, mobile phone numbers, passport numbers, and more. These are the findings of tests performed by Symantec on more than 1,500 hotels located in 54 countries. This article continues to discuss the findings of this study in relation to the leakage of guest booking info by hotel websites, along with the privacy and compliance risks associated with the leakage of this info.

    Dark Reading reports "Majority of Hotel Websites Leak Guest Booking Info"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Phishing Scheme Uses Legit Signup Forms to Steal Payment Card Data"

    Security researchers have found that cybercriminals are using signup forms for official newsletters from the websites of international companies to hide phishing attacks. According to researchers, these phishing emails can evade spam filters used by servers and clients, as well as deceive the recipients of the emails into opening them through the use of addresses of well-known official companies such as Audi, Austrian Airlines, and more. The purpose of this phishing campaign is to collect credit card information. This article continues to discuss the approach used in this new phishing campaign as well as the use of Google Translate and the tax season as phishing vectors.

    Bleeping Computer reports "Phishing Scheme Uses Legit Signup Forms to Steal Payment Card Data"

  • news

    Visible to the public "New Super-Secure Wi-Fi Is Actually Full of Security Holes"

    Wi-Fi Protected Access 3 (WPA3) isn't as secure as it was proclaimed to be as researchers have uncovered critical design flaws in the Wi-Fi security and authentication standard. According to researchers, WPA3 is vulnerable to the same attacks that WPA2 is susceptible to. WPA3 was supposed to be a major improvement over WPA2 through the performance of an encryption process, called the Dragonfly handshake. Dragonfly handshakes were expected to be harder to crack than the traditional four-way handshake used by WPA2 to generate session keys. However, researchers have discovered design flaws in the WPA3 standard's Dragonfly key exchange that could allow attackers to recover Wi-Fi passwords and enter networks. This article continues to discuss the security enhancements that WPA3 was supposed to offer and the discovery of vulnerabilities in this standard, along with the Wi-Fi Alliance's response to these findings.

    Gizmodo reports "New Super-Secure Wi-Fi Is Actually Full of Security Holes"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Google's Making It Easier to Safeguard Sensitive Data Troves"

    Google's Data Loss Prevention (DLP) tool has the capability to perform scans of large amounts of data in the cloud in order to identify and redact the data that is sensitive. The tool is used in many Google products, but it can also be used by administrators outside of Google's ecosystem as the tool offers an application programming interface. DLP has been upgraded to allow those with no technical expertise to easily use the tool. This tool has machine learning capabilities such as image recognition, machine vision, natural language processing, and context analysis to help in the discovery and redaction of sensitive data. This article continues to discuss the capabilities, goals, and applications of Google's DLP, as well as its upgrade.

    Wired reports "Google's Making It Easier to Safeguard Sensitive Data Troves"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Is AI In Cyber Security A New Tool For Hackers In 2019?"

    AI is being used more and more to help protect from cyberattacks. AI uses machine learning to enhance its intelligence. To improve cybersecurity, it fills the gap of lack of skills to prevent cyber attacks. While AI can improve cybersecurity, companies should be worried about the threat of hackers who use AI to launch attacks. Hackers that use AI can use it to bypass facial security, deceive autonomous vehicles to misinterpret speed limits and stop signals, and fool sentiment analysis of hotels, movie reviews and more. It can also be used to bypass spam filters, fake voice commands, misclassify system based medical predictions, and get past anomaly detection engines. While the benefits far outweigh potential downsides, a robust defense strategy is required by a company to protect an organizations' data from sophisticated AI-based hacking attempts.

    Dazeinfo reports: "Is AI In Cyber Security A New Tool For Hackers In 2019?"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Framing Supply Chain Attacks"

    As software development teams are pressured to deliver applications in a short amount of time, they often turn to open source components, code reuse, and third-party integrations, thus increasing the vulnerability of applications to cyberattacks and the threat of supply chain attacks. This article continues to discuss how the software industry has changed, the dependence on open source libraries and the integration of third-party scripts in the development of applications, and the growing threat of supply chain attacks.

    Help Net Security reports "Framing Supply Chain Attacks"

  • news

    Visible to the public "DNS hijacking campaigns target Gmail, Netflix, and PayPal users"

    There is a DNS hijacking campaign that has been ongoing for the past three months. Attackers are targeting the users of popular online services, including Gmail, Netflix, and PayPal. During the DNS hijacking, the hacker compromises consumer routers and modifies the DNS settings to redirect users to fake websites designed to trick victims into providing their login credentials.

    CyberDefenseMagazine reports: "DNS hijacking campaigns target Gmail, Netflix, and PayPal users"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Cybersecurity Team at NAU Testing Ternary Computing to Secure Blockchain Technology for Cryptocurrency, Other Applications"

    A team of cybersecurity researchers at Northern Arizona University's (NAU) School of Informatics, Computing, and Cyber Systems, has been awarded a $125,000 grant by the U.S. Air Force Research Lab (AFRL) in support of work to strengthen the security of the blockchain. With the support from AFRL, researchers will develop an architecture that can strengthen the security of blockchain technology through the use of ternary computing and ternary physical functions (T-PUF). This article continues to discuss cryptocurrency, blockchain technology, how blockchain technology poses a threat to U.S. national security, and the NAU project that aims to secure the blockchain.

    NAU reports "Cybersecurity Team at NAU Testing Ternary Computing to Secure Blockchain Technology for Cryptocurrency, Other Applications"

  • news

    Visible to the public "A Powerful Spyware App Now Targets iPhone Owners"

    According to researchers at the mobile security firm, Lookout, the powerful surveillance app that was initially designed for Android devices, called Exodus, now targets iPhones. The developer of the malicious app was able to evade the Apple app store's checks by abusing Apple-issued enterprise certificates. Once the app is installed on an iPhone, it can perform malicious activities such as steal photos, grab real-time location data, eavesdrop on conversations, and more. This article continues to discuss other discoveries in relation to the spyware app targeting iPhone owners and the abuse of enterprise certificates by other app makers.

    TechCrunch reports "A Powerful Spyware App Now Targets iPhone Owners"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Watch SwRI Engineers Trick Object Detection System"

    Engineers at Southwest Research Institute have developed new adversarial learning techniques that can make objects invisible to object detection systems in which deep-learning algorithms are used. These techniques can also be used to deceive object detection systems into seeing another object or seeing objects in another location. The development of these adversarial learning techniques by researchers bring further attention to the vulnerabilities in deep learning algorithms and other ML algorithms. This article continues to discuss the use of deep learning algorithms by the automotive industry, the new adversarial techniques to trick object detection systems, and efforts to increase the security of deep learning algorithms.

    TRR reports "Watch SwRI Engineers Trick Object Detection System"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Tenable Discloses Verizon Fios Router Vulnerabilities"

    Any one with a Verizon Fios Quantum Gateway router, may be at risk of cyberattacks. Tenable was able to find multiple vulnerabilities in the Verizon Fios Quantum Gateway (G1000) router. The impact of the vulnerabilities found is that a remote attacker could potentially get un-authorized access to the router, and also to the user's entire network. Verizon is in the process of automatically updating the firmware used on the Fios Quantum Gateway.

    eWeek reports: "Tenable Discloses Verizon Fios Router Vulnerabilities"

  • news

    Visible to the public HotSoS 2019 Summary Report

    Hot Topics in the Science of Security: Symposium and Bootcamp (HotSoS) 2019


  • news

    Visible to the public "It’s Disturbingly Easy to Trick AI into Doing Something Deadly"

    Recent studies conducted by artificial intelligence (AI) researchers emphasize the major impacts that adversarial machine learning (ML) can have on safety. Researchers have performed adversarial attacks on machine learning systems to demonstrate how easy it is to alter the proper functioning of such systems and highlight the potential consequences of such manipulations by hackers. This article continues to discuss adversarial attacks on machine learning, how adversarial AI attacks can affect different fields that rely on AI, and a program recently launched by DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency), called Guaranteeing AI Robustness against Deception (GARD), to defend against such attacks, along with other efforts to improve the security of ML systems.

    Vox reports "It's Disturbingly Easy to Trick AI into Doing Something Deadly"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Making Scalable On-Chip Security Pervasive"

    The growth of Internet of Things (IoT) is accompanied by the increase in accessible devices and the number of complex chip designs needed for their operation. The rapid growth of IoT devices calls for the advancement of chip-level security. According to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), there is a notable lack of common tools, methods, and solutions for the incorporation of security into chips. Therefore, DARPA developed the Automatic Implementation of Secure Silicon (AISS) program. AISS will address economic and technical challenges in regard to the implementation of security into the design of chips. This article continues to discuss the challenges associated with incorporating security into chips and the program developed by DARPA to address these challenges, which would make salable on-chip security pervasive.

    Homeland Security News Wire reports "Making Scalable On-Chip Security Pervasive"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Photons Trained for Optical Fiber Obstacle Course Will Deliver Stronger Cyber Security"

    The navigation of photons in networks of optical fibers will be improved through the use of a new technique demonstrated by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) and Singtel, Asia's leading communications group. This new approach is expected to bolster cybersecurity as it improves quantum key distribution (QKD) over fiber networks. QKD is a secure communication method in which encryption keys are created through the detection of individual photons. This article continues to discuss the concept of QKD and the new approach to improving QKD over fiber networks.

    Science Daily reports "Photons Trained for Optical Fiber Obstacle Course Will Deliver Stronger Cyber Security"

  • news

    Visible to the public "TrickBot Trojan seeks out weak human links in business to profit from the tax season"

    During tax season, there is usually an increase of Phishing attacks that occur. Many Phishing attacks this year are focused on the business segment and deployment of the TrickBot Trojan. The phishing schemes are designed to trick victims into accepting malicious Microsoft Excel documents, which contain embedded, obfuscated macros by pretending to be accounting, tax, and payroll services companies. Once TrickBot is installed on a potentially vulnerable device and can reach other devices on the network, it with then spread and pivot throughout the network.

    ZDNET reports: "TrickBot Trojan seeks out weak human links in business to profit from the tax season"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Cybercriminals (Still) Using Facebook as a Black Market"

    Cisco's Talos security researchers have found that cybercriminals are using Facebook groups for the purpose of conducting illegal activities, including selling hacking services and sensitive information such as credit card numbers. Researchers were able to find such groups by searching for certain keywords in relation to the security code located on the back of credit cards. 74 Facebook groups have been found to be used to commit cybercrimes, some of which have remained on the social network for eight years. This article continues to discuss the use of Facebook groups by cybercriminals to commit various cybercrimes and efforts to address this problem.

    PCMag reports "Cybercriminals (Still) Using Facebook as a Black Market"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Researchers Uncover US-Based Malware Distribution Centre"

    Security researchers at Bromium have discovered the use of U.S.-based web servers to host and distribute 10 types of malware via large-scale phishing campaigns. According to researchers, these web servers are owned by FranTech Solutions, a bulletproof hosting provider that uses data centers in Las Vegas, Nevada. The 10 strains of malware being hosted and distributed on these servers include Dridex, Trickbot, Gandcrab, Fareit, IcedID, and more. This article continues to discuss the discovery of a U.S.-based malware distribution center by security researchers, the phishing campaigns used to distribute malware being hosted on U.S. web servers, and what other findings suggest.

    Computer Weekly reports "Researchers Uncover US-Based Malware Distribution Centre"

  • news

    Visible to the public "What Is Shadow Mining and Why Is It a Security Threat?"

    The results of a survey recently conducted by Exabeam to which 150 cybersecurity professionals responded, indicate that most organizations lack awareness surrounding the threat of shadow mining and cryptojacking. The performance of shadow mining refers to the illicit use of an organization's computing resources by a malicious insider to mine cryptocurrencies. Shadow mining is a form of shadow IT in which an organization's IT infrastructure is utilized by an employee in a secretive or unauthorized manner. According to the results of the survey, 65 percent of organizations are not familiar with shadow mining. This article continues to discuss the concept of shadow mining and key findings of the survey in relation to the lack of awareness for cryptojacking and shadow mining.

    Help Net Security reports "What Is Shadow Mining and Why Is It a Security Threat?"

  • news

    Visible to the public HoTSoS 2019 Best Paper and Poster Awards

    The Hot Topics in Science of Security (HoTSoS) Best Paper Award recognizes the paper that exhibits outstanding achievement in science. Papers are selected by the HoTSoS Program Committee. The winning paper is automatically nomination into the Annual Best Scientific Paper Competition.

    This year's winning paper was entitled "Integrated Data Space Randomization and Control Reconfiguration for Securing Cyber-Physical Systems" by Bradley Potteiger, Zhenkai Zhang and Xenofon Koutsoukos of Vanderbilt University

  • news

    Visible to the public "Xiaomi's Phones Had a Security Flaw Preinstalled on Millions of Devices"

    Smartphones made by Xiaomi, a Chinese technology company, were discovered by researchers from Check Point to contain a security vulnerability that could allow hackers to steal data, install tracking apps, and more. According to researchers, the vulnerability derives from a preinstalled security app, called Guard Provider. The app receives updates via an unsecured HTTP connection, thus allowing hackers to perform a man-in-the-middle attack in which malware is inserted into a user's smartphone through those updates once they are connected to the same Wi-Fi network as the attackers. This article continues to discuss the security flaw in Xiaomi phones and Xiaomi's response to the discovery of this vulnerability.

    CNET reports "Xiaomi's Phones Had a Security Flaw Preinstalled on Millions of Devices"

  • news

    Visible to the public "The war between cybersecurity and cybercrime will be fought by artificial intelligence"

    The battle between cybercrime and cybersecurity will soon be fought by artificial intelligence. AI is being used more and more to launch attacks using botnets by hackers, and also AI algorithms are helping cybersecurity experts in intrusion detection and prevention systems. The AI algorithms continuously learn from past intrusion attempts and get smarter about detecting and responding to botnet attacks. AI will be important to fight cybersecurity attacks in the near future.

    Biometricupdate.com reports: "The war between cybersecurity and cybercrime will be fought by artificial intelligence"

  • news

    Visible to the public "How Malevolent Machine Learning Could Derail AI"

    Dawn Song is a professor at UC Berkley whose focus is on the security risks associated with artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML). Song recently gave a presentation at EmTech Digital, an event created by MIT Technology Review, in which she emphasized the threat posed by the emergence of new techniques for probing and manipulating ML systems known as adversarial ML methods. Adversarial ML can reveal the information that an ML algorithm has been trained on, disrupt the proper functioning of an ML system, make an ML system produce specific types of outputs, and more. This article continues to discuss the concept behind adversarial ML, different projects in relation to adversarial ML, and the growing interest surrounding this area of ML.

    MIT Technology Review reports "How Malevolent Machine Learning Could Derail AI"

  • news

    Visible to the public "Healthcare’s Huge Cybersecurity Problem"

    Healthcare has increasingly become one of the most targeted industries for cyberattacks as indicated by recent reports of ransomware attacks and other attacks. Cyberattacks against the healthcare industry are on the rise on account of the lack of preparation by hospitals and physicians in the management of cybersecurity threats, and the increasing dependence on internet-connected technology to facilitate patient care. Many of these internet-connected technologies have been found to be vulnerable to cyberattacks in which patient data can be extracted, devices can be hijacked, and more. This article continues to discuss the vulnerability of the healthcare industry to cyberattacks, the potential impact of such attacks, notable incidents of cyberattacks on healthcare, and efforts to improve healthcare cybersecurity.

    The Verge reports "Healthcare's Huge Cybersecurity Problem"