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2014-09-17
Maass, Michael, Scherlis, William L., Aldrich, Jonathan.  2014.  In-nimbo Sandboxing. Proceedings of the 2014 Symposium and Bootcamp on the Science of Security. :1:1–1:12.

Sandboxes impose a security policy, isolating applications and their components from the rest of a system. While many sandboxing techniques exist, state of the art sandboxes generally perform their functions within the system that is being defended. As a result, when the sandbox fails or is bypassed, the security of the surrounding system can no longer be assured. We experiment with the idea of in-nimbo sandboxing, encapsulating untrusted computations away from the system we are trying to protect. The idea is to delegate computations that may be vulnerable or malicious to virtual machine instances in a cloud computing environment. This may not reduce the possibility of an in-situ sandbox compromise, but it could significantly reduce the consequences should that possibility be realized. To achieve this advantage, there are additional requirements, including: (1) A regulated channel between the local and cloud environments that supports interaction with the encapsulated application, (2) Performance design that acceptably minimizes latencies in excess of the in-situ baseline. To test the feasibility of the idea, we built an in-nimbo sandbox for Adobe Reader, an application that historically has been subject to significant attacks. We undertook a prototype deployment with PDF users in a large aerospace firm. In addition to thwarting several examples of existing PDF-based malware, we found that the added increment of latency, perhaps surprisingly, does not overly impair the user experience with respect to performance or usability.

Kurilova, Darya, Omar, Cyrus, Nistor, Ligia, Chung, Benjamin, Potanin, Alex, Aldrich, Jonathan.  2014.  Type-specific Languages to Fight Injection Attacks. Proceedings of the 2014 Symposium and Bootcamp on the Science of Security. :18:1–18:2.

Injection vulnerabilities have topped rankings of the most critical web application vulnerabilities for several years [1, 2]. They can occur anywhere where user input may be erroneously executed as code. The injected input is typically aimed at gaining unauthorized access to the system or to private information within it, corrupting the system's data, or disturbing system availability. Injection vulnerabilities are tedious and difficult to prevent.

Forget, Alain, Komanduri, Saranga, Acquisti, Alessandro, Christin, Nicolas, Cranor, Lorrie Faith, Telang, Rahul.  2014.  Building the Security Behavior Observatory: An Infrastructure for Long-term Monitoring of Client Machines. Proceedings of the 2014 Symposium and Bootcamp on the Science of Security. :24:1–24:2.

We present an architecture for the Security Behavior Observatory (SBO), a client-server infrastructure designed to collect a wide array of data on user and computer behavior from hundreds of participants over several years. The SBO infrastructure had to be carefully designed to fulfill several requirements. First, the SBO must scale with the desired length, breadth, and depth of data collection. Second, we must take extraordinary care to ensure the security of the collected data, which will inevitably include intimate participant behavioral data. Third, the SBO must serve our research interests, which will inevitably change as collected data is analyzed and interpreted. This short paper summarizes some of our design and implementation benefits and discusses a few hurdles and trade-offs to consider when designing such a data collection system.

Durbeck, Lisa J. K., Athanas, Peter M., Macias, Nicholas J..  2014.  Secure-by-construction Composable Componentry for Network Processing. Proceedings of the 2014 Symposium and Bootcamp on the Science of Security. :27:1–27:2.

Techniques commonly used for analyzing streaming video, audio, SIGINT, and network transmissions, at less-than-streaming rates, such as data decimation and ad-hoc sampling, can miss underlying structure, trends and specific events held in the data[3]. This work presents a secure-by-construction approach [7] for the upper-end data streams with rates from 10- to 100 Gigabits per second. The secure-by-construction approach strives to produce system security through the composition of individually secure hardware and software components. The proposed network processor can be used not only at data centers but also within networks and onboard embedded systems at the network periphery for a wide range of tasks, including preprocessing and data cleansing, signal encoding and compression, complex event processing, flow analysis, and other tasks related to collecting and analyzing streaming data. Our design employs a four-layer scalable hardware/software stack that can lead to inherently secure, easily constructed specialized high-speed stream processing. This work addresses the following contemporary problems: (1) There is a lack of hardware/software systems providing stream processing and data stream analysis operating at the target data rates; for high-rate streams the implementation options are limited: all-software solutions can't attain the target rates[1]. GPUs and GPGPUs are also infeasible: they were not designed for I/O at 10-100Gbps; they also have asymmetric resources for input and output and thus cannot be pipelined[4, 2], whereas custom chip-based solutions are costly and inflexible to changes, and FPGA-based solutions are historically hard to program[6]; (2) There is a distinct advantage to utilizing high-bandwidth or line-speed analytics to reduce time-to-discovery of information, particularly ones that can be pipelined together to conduct a series of processing tasks or data tests without impeding data rates; (3) There is potentially significant network infrastructure cost savings possible from compact and power-efficient analytic support deployed at the network periphery on the data source or one hop away; (4) There is a need for agile deployment in response to changing objectives; (5) There is an opportunity to constrain designs to use only secure components to achieve their specific objectives. We address these five problems in our stream processor design to provide secure, easily specified processing for low-latency, low-power 10-100Gbps in-line processing on top of a commodity high-end FPGA-based hardware accelerator network processor. With a standard interface a user can snap together various filter blocks, like Legos™, to form a custom processing chain. The overall design is a four-layer solution in which the structurally lowest layer provides the vast computational power to process line-speed streaming packets, and the uppermost layer provides the agility to easily shape the system to the properties of a given application. Current work has focused on design of the two lowest layers, highlighted in the design detail in Figure 1. The two layers shown in Figure 1 are the embeddable portion of the design; these layers, operating at up to 100Gbps, capture both the low- and high frequency components of a signal or stream, analyze them directly, and pass the lower frequency components, residues to the all-software upper layers, Layers 3 and 4; they also optionally supply the data-reduced output up to Layers 3 and 4 for additional processing. Layer 1 is analogous to a systolic array of processors on which simple low-level functions or actions are chained in series[5]. Examples of tasks accomplished at the lowest layer are: (a) check to see if Field 3 of the packet is greater than 5, or (b) count the number of X.75 packets, or (c) select individual fields from data packets. Layer 1 provides the lowest latency, highest throughput processing, analysis and data reduction, formulating raw facts from the stream; Layer 2, also accelerated in hardware and running at full network line rate, combines selected facts from Layer 1, forming a first level of information kernels. Layer 2 is comprised of a number of combiners intended to integrate facts extracted from Layer 1 for presentation to Layer 3. Still resident in FPGA hardware and hardware-accelerated, a Layer 2 combiner is comprised of state logic and soft-core microprocessors. Layer 3 runs in software on a host machine, and is essentially the bridge to the embeddable hardware; this layer exposes an API for the consumption of information kernels to create events and manage state. The generated events and state are also made available to an additional software Layer 4, supplying an interface to traditional software-based systems. As shown in the design detail, network data transitions systolically through Layer 1, through a series of light-weight processing filters that extract and/or modify packet contents. All filters have a similar interface: streams enter from the left, exit the right, and relevant facts are passed upward to Layer 2. The output of the end of the chain in Layer 1 shown in the Figure 1 can be (a) left unconnected (for purely monitoring activities), (b) redirected into the network (for bent pipe operations), or (c) passed to another identical processor, for extended processing on a given stream (scalability).

Khalaj, Ebrahim, Vanciu, Radu, Abi-Antoun, Marwan.  2014.  Is There Value in Reasoning About Security at the Architectural Level: A Comparative Evaluation. Proceedings of the 2014 Symposium and Bootcamp on the Science of Security. :30:1–30:2.

We propose to build a benchmark with hand-selected test-cases from different equivalence classes, then to directly compare different approaches that make different tradeoffs to better understand which approaches find security vulnerabilities more effectively (better recall, better precision).

2014-09-26
Armknecht, F., Maes, R., Sadeghi, A, Standaert, O.-X., Wachsmann, C..  2011.  A Formalization of the Security Features of Physical Functions. Security and Privacy (SP), 2011 IEEE Symposium on. :397-412.

Physical attacks against cryptographic devices typically take advantage of information leakage (e.g., side-channels attacks) or erroneous computations (e.g., fault injection attacks). Preventing or detecting these attacks has become a challenging task in modern cryptographic research. In this context intrinsic physical properties of integrated circuits, such as Physical(ly) Unclonable Functions (PUFs), can be used to complement classical cryptographic constructions, and to enhance the security of cryptographic devices. PUFs have recently been proposed for various applications, including anti-counterfeiting schemes, key generation algorithms, and in the design of block ciphers. However, currently only rudimentary security models for PUFs exist, limiting the confidence in the security claims of PUF-based security primitives. A useful model should at the same time (i) define the security properties of PUFs abstractly and naturally, allowing to design and formally analyze PUF-based security solutions, and (ii) provide practical quantification tools allowing engineers to evaluate PUF instantiations. In this paper, we present a formal foundation for security primitives based on PUFs. Our approach requires as little as possible from the physics and focuses more on the main properties at the heart of most published works on PUFs: robustness (generation of stable answers), unclonability (not provided by algorithmic solutions), and unpredictability. We first formally define these properties and then show that they can be achieved by previously introduced PUF instantiations. We stress that such a consolidating work allows for a meaningful security analysis of security primitives taking advantage of physical properties, becoming increasingly important in the development of the next generation secure information systems.

Schwartz, E.J., Avgerinos, T., Brumley, D..  2010.  All You Ever Wanted to Know about Dynamic Taint Analysis and Forward Symbolic Execution (but Might Have Been Afraid to Ask). Security and Privacy (SP), 2010 IEEE Symposium on. :317-331.

Dynamic taint analysis and forward symbolic execution are quickly becoming staple techniques in security analyses. Example applications of dynamic taint analysis and forward symbolic execution include malware analysis, input filter generation, test case generation, and vulnerability discovery. Despite the widespread usage of these two techniques, there has been little effort to formally define the algorithms and summarize the critical issues that arise when these techniques are used in typical security contexts. The contributions of this paper are two-fold. First, we precisely describe the algorithms for dynamic taint analysis and forward symbolic execution as extensions to the run-time semantics of a general language. Second, we highlight important implementation choices, common pitfalls, and considerations when using these techniques in a security context.

2014-10-01
Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy, Mayo, Jackson R., Armstrong, Robert C., Ruthruff, Joseph R..  2011.  Noncooperatively Optimized Tolerance: Decentralized Strategic Optimization in Complex Systems. Phys. Rev. Lett.. 107:108702.

We introduce noncooperatively optimized tolerance (NOT), a game theoretic generalization of highly optimized tolerance (HOT), which we illustrate in the forest fire framework. As the number of players increases, NOT retains features of HOT, such as robustness and self-dissimilar landscapes, but also develops features of self-organized criticality. The system retains considerable robustness even as it becomes fractured, due in part to emergent cooperation between players, and at the same time exhibits increasing resilience against changes in the environment, giving rise to intermediate regimes where the system is robust to a particular distribution of adverse events, yet not very fragile to changes.

2014-10-22
Alessandro Coglio.  2014.  Pop-Refinement. Archive of Formal Proofs.

Pop-refinement is an approach to stepwise refinement, carried out inside an interactive theorem prover by constructing a monotonically decreasing sequence of predicates over deeply embedded target programs. The sequence starts with a predicate that characterizes the possible implementations, and ends with a predicate that characterizes a unique program in explicit syntactic form. Pop-refinement enables more requirements (e.g. program-level and non-functional) to be captured in the initial specification and preserved through refinement. Security requirements expressed as hyperproperties (i.e. predicates over sets of traces) are always preserved by pop-refinement, unlike the popular notion of refinement as trace set inclusion. Two simple examples in Isabelle/HOL are presented, featuring program-level requirements, non-functional requirements, and hyperproperties.

2014-10-24
Aldrich, Jonathan.  2013.  The Power of Interoperability: Why Objects Are Inevitable. Proceedings of the 2013 ACM International Symposium on New Ideas, New Paradigms, and Reflections on Programming & Software. :101–116.
Three years ago in this venue, Cook argued that in their essence, objects are what Reynolds called procedural data structures. His observation raises a natural question: if procedural data structures are the essence of objects, has this contributed to the empirical success of objects, and if so, how? This essay attempts to answer that question. After reviewing Cook's definition, I propose the term service abstractions to capture the essential nature of objects. This terminology emphasizes, following Kay, that objects are not primarily about representing and manipulating data, but are more about providing services in support of higher-level goals. Using examples taken from object-oriented frameworks, I illustrate the unique design leverage that service abstractions provide: the ability to define abstractions that can be extended, and whose extensions are interoperable in a first-class way. The essay argues that the form of interoperable extension supported by service abstractions is essential to modern software: many modern frameworks and ecosystems could not have been built without service abstractions. In this sense, the success of objects was not a coincidence: it was an inevitable consequence of their service abstraction nature.
Omar, Cyrus, Chung, Benjamin, Kurilova, Darya, Potanin, Alex, Aldrich, Jonathan.  2013.  Type-directed, whitespace-delimited parsing for embedded DSLs. Proceedings of the First Workshop on the Globalization of Domain Specific Languages. :8–11.
Domain-specific languages improve ease-of-use, expressiveness and verifiability, but defining and using different DSLs within a single application remains difficult. We introduce an approach for embedded DSLs where 1) whitespace delimits DSL-governed blocks, and 2) the parsing and type checking phases occur in tandem so that the expected type of the block determines which domain-specific parser governs that block. We argue that this approach occupies a sweet spot, providing high expressiveness and ease-of-use while maintaining safe composability. We introduce the design, provide examples and describe an ongoing implementation of this strategy in the Wyvern programming language. We also discuss how a more conventional keyword-directed strategy for parsing of DSLs can arise as a special case of this type-directed strategy.
Nistor, Ligia, Kurilova, Darya, Balzer, Stephanie, Chung, Benjamin, Potanin, Alex, Aldrich, Jonathan.  2013.  Wyvern: A Simple, Typed, and Pure Object-oriented Language. Proceedings of the 5th Workshop on MechAnisms for SPEcialization, Generalization and inHerItance. :9–16.
The simplest and purest practical object-oriented language designs today are seen in dynamically-typed languages, such as Smalltalk and Self. Static types, however, have potential benefits for productivity, security, and reasoning about programs. In this paper, we describe the design of Wyvern, a statically typed, pure object-oriented language that attempts to retain much of the simplicity and expressiveness of these iconic designs. Our goals lead us to combine pure object-oriented and functional abstractions in a simple, typed setting. We present a foundational object-based language that we believe to be as close as one can get to simple typed lambda calculus while keeping object-orientation. We show how this foundational language can be translated to the typed lambda calculus via standard encodings. We then define a simple extension to this language that introduces classes and show that classes are no more than sugar for the foundational object-based language. Our future intention is to demonstrate that modules and other object-oriented features can be added to our language as not more than such syntactical extensions while keeping the object-oriented core as pure as possible. The design of Wyvern closely follows both historical and modern ideas about the essence of object-orientation, suggesting a new way to think about a minimal, practical, typed core language for objects.
2015-01-09
Liang Zhang, Dave Choffnes, Tudor Dumitras, Dave Levin, Alan Mislove, Aaron Schulman, Christo Wilson.  2014.  Analysis of SSL Certificate Reissues and Revocations in the Wake of Heartbleed.

Central to the secure operation of a public key infrastructure (PKI) is the ability to revoke certificates. While much of users' security rests on this process taking place quickly, in practice, revocation typically requires a human to decide to reissue a new certificate and revoke the old one. Thus, having a proper understanding of how often systems administrators reissue and revoke certificates is crucial to understanding the integrity of a PKI. Unfortunately, this is typically difficult to measure: while it is relatively easy to determine when a certificate is revoked, it is difficult to determine whether and when an administrator should have revoked.

In this paper, we use a recent widespread security vulnerability as a natural experiment. Publicly announced in April 2014, the Heartbleed OpenSSL bug, potentially (and undetectably) revealed servers' private keys. Administrators of servers that were susceptible to Heartbleed should have revoked their certificates and reissued new ones, ideally as soon as the vulnerability was publicly announced.

Using a set of all certificates advertised by the Alexa Top 1 Million domains over a period of six months, we explore the patterns of reissuing and revoking certificates in the wake of Heartbleed. We find that over 73% of vulnerable certificates had yet to be reissued and over 87% had yet to be revoked three weeks after Heartbleed was disclosed. Moreover, our results show a drastic decline in revocations on the weekends, even immediately following the Heartbleed announcement. These results are an important step in understanding the manual processes on which users rely for secure, authenticated communication.

2015-03-03
Abbas, W., Koutsoukos, X..  2015.  Efficient Complete Coverage Through Heterogeneous Sensing Nodes. Wireless Communications Letters, IEEE. 4:14-17.

We investigate the coverage efficiency of a sensor network consisting of sensors with circular sensing footprints of different radii. The objective is to completely cover a region in an efficient manner through a controlled (or deterministic) deployment of such sensors. In particular, it is shown that when sensing nodes of two different radii are used for complete coverage, the coverage density is increased, and the sensing cost is significantly reduced as compared to the homogeneous case, in which all nodes have the same sensing radius. Configurations of heterogeneous disks of multiple radii to achieve efficient circle coverings are presented and analyzed.

2015-04-02
Olga Zielinska, Allaire Welk, Christopher B. Mayhorn, Emerson Murphy-Hill.  2015.  Exploring expert and novice mental models of phishing. HotSoS: Symposium and Bootcamp on the Science of Security.

Experience influences actions people take in protecting themselves against phishing. One way to measure experience is through mental models. Mental models are internal representations of a concept or system that develop with experience. By rating pairs of concepts on the strength of their relationship, networks can be created through Pathfinder, showing an in-depth analysis of how information is organized. Researchers had novice and expert computer users rate three sets of terms related to phishing. The terms were divided into three categories: prevention of phishing, trends and characteristics of phishing attacks, and the consequences of phishing. Results indicated that expert mental models were more complex with more links between concepts. Specifically, experts had sixteen, thirteen, and fifteen links in the networks describing the prevention, trends, and consequences of phishing, respectively; however, novices only had eleven, nine, and nine links in the networks describing prevention, trends, and consequences of phishing, respectively. These preliminary results provide quantifiable network displays of mental models of novices and experts that cannot be seen through interviews. This information could provide a basis for future research on how mental models could be used to determine phishing vulnerability and the effectiveness of phishing training.

Allaire K. Welk, Christopher B. Mayhorn.  2015.  All Signals Go: Investigating How Individual Differences Affect Performance on a Medical Diagnosis Task Designed to Parallel a Signal Intelligence Analyst Task. Symposium and Bootcamp on the Science of Security (HotSoS).

Signals intelligence analysts play a critical role in the United States government by providing information regarding potential national security threats to government leaders. Analysts perform complex decision-making tasks that involve gathering, sorting, and analyzing information. The current study evaluated how individual differences and training influence performance on an Internet search-based medical diagnosis task designed to simulate a signals analyst task. The implemented training emphasized the extraction and organization of relevant information and deductive reasoning. The individual differences of interest included working memory capacity and previous experience with elements of the task, specifically health literacy, prior experience using the Internet, and prior experience conducting Internet searches. Preliminary results indicated that the implemented training did not significantly affect performance, however, working memory significantly predicted performance on the implemented task. These results support previous research and provide additional evidence that working memory capacity influences performance on cognitively complex decision-making tasks, whereas experience with elements of the task may not. These findings suggest that working memory capacity should be considered when screening individuals for signals intelligence positions. Future research should aim to generalize these findings within a broader sample, and ideally utilize a task that directly replicates those performed by signals analysts.

2015-04-07
Titus Barik, Arpan Chakraborty, Brent Harrison, David L. Roberts, Robert St. Amant.  2013.  Modeling the Concentration Game with ACT-R. The 12th International Conference on Cognitive Modeling.

This paper describes the development of subsymbolic ACT-R models for the Concentration game. Performance data is taken from an experiment in which participants played the game un- der two conditions: minimizing the number of mismatches/ turns during a game, and minimizing the time to complete a game. Conflict resolution and parameter tuning are used to implement an accuracy model and a speed model that capture the differences for the two conditions. Visual attention drives exploration of the game board in the models. Modeling re- sults are generally consistent with human performance, though some systematic differences can be seen. Modeling decisions, model limitations, and open issues are discussed. 

Ignacio X. Dominguez, Alok Goel, David L. Roberts, Robert St. Amant.  2015.  Detecting Abnormal User Behavior Through Pattern-mining Input Device Analytics. Proceedings of the 2015 Symposium and Bootcamp on the Science of Security (HotSoS-15).
2015-04-30
Alqahtani, Saeed M., Balushi, Maqbool Al, John, Robert.  2014.  An Intelligent Intrusion Detection System for Cloud Computing (SIDSCC). Proceedings of the 2014 International Conference on Computational Science and Computational Intelligence - Volume 02. :135–141.

Cloud computing is a distributed architecture that has shared resources, software, and information. There exists a great number of implementations and research for Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS) in grid and cloud environments, however they are limited in addressing the requirements for an ideal intrusion detection system. Security issues in Cloud Computing (CC) have become a major concern to its users, availability being one of the key security issues. Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) is one of these security issues that poses a great threat to the availability of the cloud services. The aim of this research is to evaluate the performance of IDS in CC when the DDoS attack is detected in a private cloud, named Saa SCloud. A model has been implemented on three virtual machines, Saa SCloud Model, DDoS attack Model, and IDSServer Model. Through this implementation, Service Intrusion Detection System in Cloud Computing (SIDSCC) will be proposed, investigated and evaluated.

Anwar, Z., Malik, A.W..  2014.  Can a DDoS Attack Meltdown My Data Center? A Simulation Study and Defense Strategies Communications Letters, IEEE. 18:1175-1178.

The goal of this letter is to explore the extent to which the vulnerabilities plaguing the Internet, particularly susceptibility to distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, impact the Cloud. DDoS has been known to disrupt Cloud services, but could it do worse by permanently damaging server and switch hardware? Services are hosted in data centers with thousands of servers generating large amounts of heat. Heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems prevent server downtime due to overheating. These are remotely managed using network management protocols that are susceptible to network attacks. Recently, Cloud providers have experienced outages due to HVAC malfunctions. Our contributions include a network simulation to study the feasibility of such an attack motivated by our experiences of such a security incident in a real data center. It demonstrates how a network simulator can study the interplay of the communication and thermal properties of a network and help prevent the Cloud provider's worst nightmare: meltdown of the data center as a result of a DDoS attack.

Al-Jarrah, O., Arafat, A..  2014.  Network Intrusion Detection System using attack behavior classification. Information and Communication Systems (ICICS), 2014 5th International Conference on. :1-6.

Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS) have become a necessity in computer security systems because of the increase in unauthorized accesses and attacks. Intrusion Detection is a major component in computer security systems that can be classified as Host-based Intrusion Detection System (HIDS), which protects a certain host or system and Network-based Intrusion detection system (NIDS), which protects a network of hosts and systems. This paper addresses Probes attacks or reconnaissance attacks, which try to collect any possible relevant information in the network. Network probe attacks have two types: Host Sweep and Port Scan attacks. Host Sweep attacks determine the hosts that exist in the network, while port scan attacks determine the available services that exist in the network. This paper uses an intelligent system to maximize the recognition rate of network attacks by embedding the temporal behavior of the attacks into a TDNN neural network structure. The proposed system consists of five modules: packet capture engine, preprocessor, pattern recognition, classification, and monitoring and alert module. We have tested the system in a real environment where it has shown good capability in detecting attacks. In addition, the system has been tested using DARPA 1998 dataset with 100% recognition rate. In fact, our system can recognize attacks in a constant time.

Athanasiou, G., Fengou, M.-A., Beis, A., Lymberopoulos, D..  2014.  A novel trust evaluation method for Ubiquitous Healthcare based on cloud computational theory. Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE. :4503-4506.

The notion of trust is considered to be the cornerstone on patient-psychiatrist relationship. Thus, a trustfully background is fundamental requirement for provision of effective Ubiquitous Healthcare (UH) service. In this paper, the issue of Trust Evaluation of UH Providers when register UH environment is addressed. For that purpose a novel trust evaluation method is proposed, based on cloud theory, exploiting User Profile attributes. This theory mimics human thinking, regarding trust evaluation and captures fuzziness and randomness of this uncertain reasoning. Two case studies are investigated through simulation in MATLAB software, in order to verify the effectiveness of this novel method.

Algarni, A., Yue Xu, Chan, T..  2014.  Social Engineering in Social Networking Sites: The Art of Impersonation. Services Computing (SCC), 2014 IEEE International Conference on. :797-804.

Social networking sites (SNSs), with their large number of users and large information base, seem to be the perfect breeding ground for exploiting the vulnerabilities of people, who are considered the weakest link in security. Deceiving, persuading, or influencing people to provide information or to perform an action that will benefit the attacker is known as "social engineering." Fraudulent and deceptive people use social engineering traps and tactics through SNSs to trick users into obeying them, accepting threats, and falling victim to various crimes such as phishing, sexual abuse, financial abuse, identity theft, and physical crime. Although organizations, researchers, and practitioners recognize the serious risks of social engineering, there is a severe lack of understanding and control of such threats. This may be partly due to the complexity of human behaviors in approaching, accepting, and failing to recognize social engineering tricks. This research aims to investigate the impact of source characteristics on users' susceptibility to social engineering victimization in SNSs, particularly Facebook. Using grounded theory method, we develop a model that explains what and how source characteristics influence Facebook users to judge the attacker as credible.

Aiash, M., Mapp, G., Gemikonakli, O..  2014.  Secure Live Virtual Machines Migration: Issues and Solutions. Advanced Information Networking and Applications Workshops (WAINA), 2014 28th International Conference on. :160-165.

In recent years, there has been a huge trend towards running network intensive applications, such as Internet servers and Cloud-based service in virtual environment, where multiple virtual machines (VMs) running on the same machine share the machine's physical and network resources. In such environment, the virtual machine monitor (VMM) virtualizes the machine's resources in terms of CPU, memory, storage, network and I/O devices to allow multiple operating systems running in different VMs to operate and access the network concurrently. A key feature of virtualization is live migration (LM) that allows transfer of virtual machine from one physical server to another without interrupting the services running in virtual machine. Live migration facilitates workload balancing, fault tolerance, online system maintenance, consolidation of virtual machines etc. However, live migration is still in an early stage of implementation and its security is yet to be evaluated. The security concern of live migration is a major factor for its adoption by the IT industry. Therefore, this paper uses the X.805 security standard to investigate attacks on live virtual machine migration. The analysis highlights the main source of threats and suggests approaches to tackle them. The paper also surveys and compares different proposals in the literature to secure the live migration.