Visible to the public Biblio

Filters: Author is Hou, Y. T.  [Clear All Filters]
2018-01-23
Wang, B., Song, W., Lou, W., Hou, Y. T..  2017.  Privacy-preserving pattern matching over encrypted genetic data in cloud computing. IEEE INFOCOM 2017 - IEEE Conference on Computer Communications. :1–9.

Personalized medicine performs diagnoses and treatments according to the DNA information of the patients. The new paradigm will change the health care model in the future. A doctor will perform the DNA sequence matching instead of the regular clinical laboratory tests to diagnose and medicate the diseases. Additionally, with the help of the affordable personal genomics services such as 23andMe, personalized medicine will be applied to a great population. Cloud computing will be the perfect computing model as the volume of the DNA data and the computation over it are often immense. However, due to the sensitivity, the DNA data should be encrypted before being outsourced into the cloud. In this paper, we start from a practical system model of the personalize medicine and present a solution for the secure DNA sequence matching problem in cloud computing. Comparing with the existing solutions, our scheme protects the DNA data privacy as well as the search pattern to provide a better privacy guarantee. We have proved that our scheme is secure under the well-defined cryptographic assumption, i.e., the sub-group decision assumption over a bilinear group. Unlike the existing interactive schemes, our scheme requires only one round of communication, which is critical in practical application scenarios. We also carry out a simulation study using the real-world DNA data to evaluate the performance of our scheme. The simulation results show that the computation overhead for real world problems is practical, and the communication cost is small. Furthermore, our scheme is not limited to the genome matching problem but it applies to general privacy preserving pattern matching problems which is widely used in real world.

2021-03-09
Xiao, Y., Zhang, N., Lou, W., Hou, Y. T..  2020.  Modeling the Impact of Network Connectivity on Consensus Security of Proof-of-Work Blockchain. IEEE INFOCOM 2020 - IEEE Conference on Computer Communications. :1648—1657.

Blockchain, the technology behind the popular Bitcoin, is considered a "security by design" system as it is meant to create security among a group of distrustful parties yet without a central trusted authority. The security of blockchain relies on the premise of honest-majority, namely, the blockchain system is assumed to be secure as long as the majority of consensus voting power is honest. And in the case of proof-of-work (PoW) blockchain, adversaries cannot control more than 50% of the network's gross computing power. However, this 50% threshold is based on the analysis of computing power only, with implicit and idealistic assumptions on the network and node behavior. Recent researches have alluded that factors such as network connectivity, presence of blockchain forks, and mining strategy could undermine the consensus security assured by the honest-majority, but neither concrete analysis nor quantitative evaluation is provided. In this paper we fill the gap by proposing an analytical model to assess the impact of network connectivity on the consensus security of PoW blockchain under different adversary models. We apply our analytical model to two adversarial scenarios: 1) honest-but-potentially-colluding, 2) selfish mining. For each scenario, we quantify the communication capability of nodes involved in a fork race and estimate the adversary's mining revenue and its impact on security properties of the consensus protocol. Simulation results validated our analysis. Our modeling and analysis provide a paradigm for assessing the security impact of various factors in a distributed consensus system.