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Feng, C., Li, T., Chana, D..  2017.  Multi-level Anomaly Detection in Industrial Control Systems via Package Signatures and LSTM Networks. 2017 47th Annual IEEE/IFIP International Conference on Dependable Systems and Networks (DSN). :261–272.

We outline an anomaly detection method for industrial control systems (ICS) that combines the analysis of network package contents that are transacted between ICS nodes and their time-series structure. Specifically, we take advantage of the predictable and regular nature of communication patterns that exist between so-called field devices in ICS networks. By observing a system for a period of time without the presence of anomalies we develop a base-line signature database for general packages. A Bloom filter is used to store the signature database which is then used for package content level anomaly detection. Furthermore, we approach time-series anomaly detection by proposing a stacked Long Short Term Memory (LSTM) network-based softmax classifier which learns to predict the most likely package signatures that are likely to occur given previously seen package traffic. Finally, by the inspection of a real dataset created from a gas pipeline SCADA system, we show that an anomaly detection scheme combining both approaches can achieve higher performance compared to various current state-of-the-art techniques.

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Zhang, B., Ye, J., Feng, C., Tang, C..  2017.  S2F: Discover Hard-to-Reach Vulnerabilities by Semi-Symbolic Fuzz Testing. 2017 13th International Conference on Computational Intelligence and Security (CIS). :548–552.
Fuzz testing is a popular program testing technique. However, it is difficult to find hard-to-reach vulnerabilities that are nested with complex branches. In this paper, we propose semi-symbolic fuzz testing to discover hard-to-reach vulnerabilities. Our method groups inputs into high frequency and low frequency ones. Then symbolic execution is utilized to solve only uncovered branches to mitigate the path explosion problem. Especially, in order to play the advantages of fuzz testing, our method locates critical branch for each low frequency input and corrects the generated test cases to comfort the branch condition. We also implemented a prototype\textbackslashtextbarS2F, and the experimental results show that S2F can gain 17.70% coverage performance and discover more hard-to-reach vulnerabilities than other vulnerability detection tools for our benchmark.
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Feng, C., Wu, S., Liu, N..  2017.  A user-centric machine learning framework for cyber security operations center. 2017 IEEE International Conference on Intelligence and Security Informatics (ISI). :173–175.

To assure cyber security of an enterprise, typically SIEM (Security Information and Event Management) system is in place to normalize security events from different preventive technologies and flag alerts. Analysts in the security operation center (SOC) investigate the alerts to decide if it is truly malicious or not. However, generally the number of alerts is overwhelming with majority of them being false positive and exceeding the SOC's capacity to handle all alerts. Because of this, potential malicious attacks and compromised hosts may be missed. Machine learning is a viable approach to reduce the false positive rate and improve the productivity of SOC analysts. In this paper, we develop a user-centric machine learning framework for the cyber security operation center in real enterprise environment. We discuss the typical data sources in SOC, their work flow, and how to leverage and process these data sets to build an effective machine learning system. The paper is targeted towards two groups of readers. The first group is data scientists or machine learning researchers who do not have cyber security domain knowledge but want to build machine learning systems for security operations center. The second group of audiences are those cyber security practitioners who have deep knowledge and expertise in cyber security, but do not have machine learning experiences and wish to build one by themselves. Throughout the paper, we use the system we built in the Symantec SOC production environment as an example to demonstrate the complete steps from data collection, label creation, feature engineering, machine learning algorithm selection, model performance evaluations, to risk score generation.