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C
Acar, Y., Backes, M., Fahl, S., Garfinkel, S., Kim, D., Mazurek, M. L., Stransky, C..  2017.  Comparing the Usability of Cryptographic APIs. 2017 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP). :154–171.
Potentially dangerous cryptography errors are well-documented in many applications. Conventional wisdom suggests that many of these errors are caused by cryptographic Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) that are too complicated, have insecure defaults, or are poorly documented. To address this problem, researchers have created several cryptographic libraries that they claim are more usable, however, none of these libraries have been empirically evaluated for their ability to promote more secure development. This paper is the first to examine both how and why the design and resulting usability of different cryptographic libraries affects the security of code written with them, with the goal of understanding how to build effective future libraries. We conducted a controlled experiment in which 256 Python developers recruited from GitHub attempt common tasks involving symmetric and asymmetric cryptography using one of five different APIs. We examine their resulting code for functional correctness and security, and compare their results to their self-reported sentiment about their assigned library. Our results suggest that while APIs designed for simplicity can provide security benefits - reducing the decision space, as expected, prevents choice of insecure parameters - simplicity is not enough. Poor documentation, missing code examples, and a lack of auxiliary features such as secure key storage, caused even participants assigned to simplified libraries to struggle with both basic functional correctness and security. Surprisingly, the availability of comprehensive documentation and easy-to-use code examples seems to compensate for more complicated APIs in terms of functionally correct results and participant reactions, however, this did not extend to security results. We find it particularly concerning that for about 20% of functionally correct tasks, across libraries, participants believed their code was secure when it was not. Our results suggest that while ne- cryptographic libraries that want to promote effective security should offer a simple, convenient interface, this is not enough: they should also, and perhaps more importantly, ensure support for a broad range of common tasks and provide accessible documentation with secure, easy-to-use code examples.
N
Lim, H., Ni, A., Kim, D., Ko, Y. B..  2017.  Named data networking testbed for scientific data. 2017 2nd International Conference on Computer and Communication Systems (ICCCS). :65–69.

Named Data Networking (NDN) is one of the future internet architectures, which is a clean-slate approach. NDN provides intelligent data retrieval using the principles of name-based symmetrical forwarding of Interest/Data packets and innetwork caching. The continually increasing demand for rapid dissemination of large-scale scientific data is driving the use of NDN in data-intensive science experiments. In this paper, we establish an intercontinental NDN testbed. In the testbed, an NDN-based application that targets climate science as an example data intensive science application is designed and implemented, which has differentiated features compared to those of previous studies. We verify experimental justification of using NDN for climate science in the intercontinental network, through performance comparisons between classical delivery techniques and NDN-based climate data delivery.

S
Woo, S., Ha, J., Byun, J., Kwon, K., Tolcha, Y., Kang, D., Nguyen, H. M., Kim, M., Kim, D..  2017.  Secure-EPCIS: Addressing Security Issues in EPCIS for IoT Applications. 2017 IEEE World Congress on Services (SERVICES). :40–43.
In the EPCglobal standards for RFID architecture frameworks and interfaces, the Electronic Product Code Information System (EPCIS) acts as a standard repository storing event and master data that are well suited to Supply Chain Management (SCM) applications. Oliot-EPCIS broadens its scope to a wider range of IoT applications in a scalable and flexible way to store a large amount of heterogeneous data from a variety of sources. However, this expansion poses data security challenge for IoT applications including patients' ownership of events generated in mobile healthcare services. Thus, in this paper we propose Secure-EPCIS to deal with security issues of EPCIS for IoT applications. We have analyzed the requirements for Secure-EPCIS based on real-world scenarios and designed access control model accordingly. Moreover, we have conducted extensive performance comparisons between EPCIS and Secure-EPCIS in terms of response time and throughput, and provide the solution for performance degradation problem in Secure-EPCIS.
U
Kim, D., Shin, D., Shin, D..  2018.  Unauthorized Access Point Detection Using Machine Learning Algorithms for Information Protection. 2018 17th IEEE International Conference On Trust, Security And Privacy In Computing And Communications/ 12th IEEE International Conference On Big Data Science And Engineering (TrustCom/BigDataSE). :1876-1878.

With the frequent use of Wi-Fi and hotspots that provide a wireless Internet environment, awareness and threats to wireless AP (Access Point) security are steadily increasing. Especially when using unauthorized APs in company, government and military facilities, there is a high possibility of being subjected to various viruses and hacking attacks. It is necessary to detect unauthorized Aps for protection of information. In this paper, we use RTT (Round Trip Time) value data set to detect authorized and unauthorized APs in wired / wireless integrated environment, analyze them using machine learning algorithms including SVM (Support Vector Machine), C4.5, KNN (K Nearest Neighbors) and MLP (Multilayer Perceptron). Overall, KNN shows the highest accuracy.

W
Hong, H., Choi, H., Kim, D., Kim, H., Hong, B., Noh, J., Kim, Y..  2017.  When Cellular Networks Met IPv6: Security Problems of Middleboxes in IPv6 Cellular Networks. 2017 IEEE European Symposium on Security and Privacy (EuroS P). :595–609.

Recently, cellular operators have started migrating to IPv6 in response to the increasing demand for IP addresses. With the introduction of IPv6, cellular middleboxes, such as firewalls for preventing malicious traffic from the Internet and stateful NAT64 boxes for providing backward compatibility with legacy IPv4 services, have become crucial to maintain stability of cellular networks. This paper presents security problems of the currently deployed IPv6 middleboxes of five major operators. To this end, we first investigate several key features of the current IPv6 deployment that can harm the safety of a cellular network as well as its customers. These features combined with the currently deployed IPv6 middlebox allow an adversary to launch six different attacks. First, firewalls in IPv6 cellular networks fail to block incoming packets properly. Thus, an adversary could fingerprint cellular devices with scanning, and further, she could launch denial-of-service or over-billing attacks. Second, vulnerabilities in the stateful NAT64 box, a middlebox that maps an IPv6 address to an IPv4 address (and vice versa), allow an adversary to launch three different attacks: 1) NAT overflow attack that allows an adversary to overflow the NAT resources, 2) NAT wiping attack that removes active NAT mappings by exploiting the lack of TCP sequence number verification of firewalls, and 3) NAT bricking attack that targets services adopting IP-based blacklisting by preventing the shared external IPv4 address from accessing the service. We confirmed the feasibility of these attacks with an empirical analysis. We also propose effective countermeasures for each attack.