Visible to the public Biblio

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2014
Kuntz, K., Smith, M., Wedeward, K., Collins, M..  2014.  Detecting, locating, amp; quantifying false data injections utilizing grid topology through optimized D-FACTS device placement. North American Power Symposium (NAPS), 2014. :1-6.

Power grids are monitored by gathering data through remote sensors and estimating the state of the grid. Bad data detection schemes detect and remove poor data. False data is a special type of data injection designed to evade typical bad data detection schemes and compromise state estimates, possibly leading to improper control of the grid. Topology perturbation is a situational awareness method that implements the use of distributed flexible AC transmission system devices to alter impedance on optimally chosen lines, updating the grid topology and exposing the presence of false data. The success of the topology perturbation for improving grid control and exposing false data in AC state estimation is demonstrated. A technique is developed for identifying the false data injection attack vector and quantifying the compromised measurements. The proposed method provides successful false data detection and identification in IEEE 14, 24, and 39-bus test systems using AC state estimation.
 

2020
Danilova, A., Naiakshina, A., Smith, M..  2020.  One Size Does Not Fit All: A Grounded Theory and Online Survey Study of Developer Preferences for Security Warning Types. 2020 IEEE/ACM 42nd International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE). :136–148.
A wide range of tools exist to assist developers in creating secure software. Many of these tools, such as static analysis engines or security checkers included in compilers, use warnings to communicate security issues to developers. The effectiveness of these tools relies on developers heeding these warnings, and there are many ways in which these warnings could be displayed. Johnson et al. [46] conducted qualitative research and found that warning presentation and integration are main issues. We built on Johnson et al.'s work and examined what developers want from security warnings, including what form they should take and how they should integrate into their workflow and work context. To this end, we conducted a Grounded Theory study with 14 professional software developers and 12 computer science students as well as a focus group with 7 academic researchers to gather qualitative insights. To back up the theory developed from the qualitative research, we ran a quantitative survey with 50 professional software developers. Our results show that there is significant heterogeneity amongst developers and that no one warning type is preferred over all others. The context in which the warnings are shown is also highly relevant, indicating that it is likely to be beneficial if IDEs and other development tools become more flexible in their warning interactions with developers. Based on our findings, we provide concrete recommendations for both future research as well as how IDEs and other security tools can improve their interaction with developers.