Visible to the public Biblio

Filters: Author is Srivastava, A.  [Clear All Filters]
2015-05-05
Vellaithurai, C., Srivastava, A., Zonouz, S., Berthier, R..  2015.  CPIndex: Cyber-Physical Vulnerability Assessment for Power-Grid Infrastructures. Smart Grid, IEEE Transactions on. 6:566-575.

To protect complex power-grid control networks, power operators need efficient security assessment techniques that take into account both cyber side and the power side of the cyber-physical critical infrastructures. In this paper, we present CPINDEX, a security-oriented stochastic risk management technique that calculates cyber-physical security indices to measure the security level of the underlying cyber-physical setting. CPINDEX installs appropriate cyber-side instrumentation probes on individual host systems to dynamically capture and profile low-level system activities such as interprocess communications among operating system assets. CPINDEX uses the generated logs along with the topological information about the power network configuration to build stochastic Bayesian network models of the whole cyber-physical infrastructure and update them dynamically based on the current state of the underlying power system. Finally, CPINDEX implements belief propagation algorithms on the created stochastic models combined with a novel graph-theoretic power system indexing algorithm to calculate the cyber-physical index, i.e., to measure the security-level of the system's current cyber-physical state. The results of our experiments with actual attacks against a real-world power control network shows that CPINDEX, within few seconds, can efficiently compute the numerical indices during the attack that indicate the progressing malicious attack correctly.
 

2015-05-06
Chongxi Bao, Forte, D., Srivastava, A..  2014.  On application of one-class SVM to reverse engineering-based hardware Trojan detection. Quality Electronic Design (ISQED), 2014 15th International Symposium on. :47-54.

Due to design and fabrication outsourcing to foundries, the problem of malicious modifications to integrated circuits known as hardware Trojans has attracted attention in academia as well as industry. To reduce the risks associated with Trojans, researchers have proposed different approaches to detect them. Among these approaches, test-time detection approaches have drawn the greatest attention and most approaches assume the existence of a “golden model”. Prior works suggest using reverse-engineering to identify such Trojan-free ICs for the golden model but they did not state how to do this efficiently. In this paper, we propose an innovative and robust reverseengineering approach to identify the Trojan-free ICs. We adapt a well-studied machine learning method, one-class support vector machine, to solve our problem. Simulation results using state-of-the-art tools on several publicly available circuits show that our approach can detect hardware Trojans with high accuracy rate across different modeling and algorithm parameters.

2018-05-01
Liu, Y., Bao, C., Xie, Y., Srivastava, A..  2017.  Introducing TFUE: The Trusted Foundry and Untrusted Employee Model in IC Supply Chain Security. 2017 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS). :1–4.
In contrast to other studies in IC supply chain security where foundries are classified as either untrusted or trusted, a more realistic threat model is that the foundries are legally and economically obliged to perform trustworthy service, and it is the individual employees that introduce security risks. We call the above as the trusted foundry and untrusted employee (TFUE) model. Based on this model, we investigate new opportunities of establishing trustworthy operations in foundries made possible by double patterning lithography (DPL). DPL is used to setup two independent mask development lines which do not need to share any information. Under this setup, we consider the attack model where the untrusted employee(s) may try to insert Trojans into the circuit. As a countermeasure, we customize DPL to decompose the layout into two sub-layouts in such a way that each sub-layout individually expose minimum information to the untrusted employee.