Visible to the public Biblio

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Journal Article
Tang, Lu-An, Han, Jiawei, Jiang, Guofei.  2014.  Mining sensor data in cyber-physical systems. Tsinghua Science and Technology. 19:225-234.

A Cyber-Physical System (CPS) integrates physical devices (i.e., sensors) with cyber (i.e., informational) components to form a context sensitive system that responds intelligently to dynamic changes in real-world situations. Such a system has wide applications in the scenarios of traffic control, battlefield surveillance, environmental monitoring, and so on. A core element of CPS is the collection and assessment of information from noisy, dynamic, and uncertain physical environments integrated with many types of cyber-space resources. The potential of this integration is unbounded. To achieve this potential the raw data acquired from the physical world must be transformed into useable knowledge in real-time. Therefore, CPS brings a new dimension to knowledge discovery because of the emerging synergism of the physical and the cyber. The various properties of the physical world must be addressed in information management and knowledge discovery. This paper discusses the problems of mining sensor data in CPS: With a large number of wireless sensors deployed in a designated area, the task is real time detection of intruders that enter the area based on noisy sensor data. The framework of IntruMine is introduced to discover intruders from untrustworthy sensor data. IntruMine first analyzes the trustworthiness of sensor data, then detects the intruders' locations, and verifies the detections based on a graph model of the relationships between sensors and intruders.

Conference Paper
Xu, Zhang, Wu, Zhenyu, Li, Zhichun, Jee, Kangkook, Rhee, Junghwan, Xiao, Xusheng, Xu, Fengyuan, Wang, Haining, Jiang, Guofei.  2016.  High Fidelity Data Reduction for Big Data Security Dependency Analyses. Proceedings of the 2016 ACM SIGSAC Conference on Computer and Communications Security. :504–516.

Intrusive multi-step attacks, such as Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) attacks, have plagued enterprises with significant financial losses and are the top reason for enterprises to increase their security budgets. Since these attacks are sophisticated and stealthy, they can remain undetected for years if individual steps are buried in background "noise." Thus, enterprises are seeking solutions to "connect the suspicious dots" across multiple activities. This requires ubiquitous system auditing for long periods of time, which in turn causes overwhelmingly large amount of system audit events. Given a limited system budget, how to efficiently handle ever-increasing system audit logs is a great challenge. This paper proposes a new approach that exploits the dependency among system events to reduce the number of log entries while still supporting high-quality forensic analysis. In particular, we first propose an aggregation algorithm that preserves the dependency of events during data reduction to ensure the high quality of forensic analysis. Then we propose an aggressive reduction algorithm and exploit domain knowledge for further data reduction. To validate the efficacy of our proposed approach, we conduct a comprehensive evaluation on real-world auditing systems using log traces of more than one month. Our evaluation results demonstrate that our approach can significantly reduce the size of system logs and improve the efficiency of forensic analysis without losing accuracy.

Cheng, Wei, Zhang, Kai, Chen, Haifeng, Jiang, Guofei, Chen, Zhengzhang, Wang, Wei.  2016.  Ranking Causal Anomalies via Temporal and Dynamical Analysis on Vanishing Correlations. Proceedings of the 22Nd ACM SIGKDD International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining. :805–814.

Modern world has witnessed a dramatic increase in our ability to collect, transmit and distribute real-time monitoring and surveillance data from large-scale information systems and cyber-physical systems. Detecting system anomalies thus attracts significant amount of interest in many fields such as security, fault management, and industrial optimization. Recently, invariant network has shown to be a powerful way in characterizing complex system behaviours. In the invariant network, a node represents a system component and an edge indicates a stable, significant interaction between two components. Structures and evolutions of the invariance network, in particular the vanishing correlations, can shed important light on locating causal anomalies and performing diagnosis. However, existing approaches to detect causal anomalies with the invariant network often use the percentage of vanishing correlations to rank possible casual components, which have several limitations: 1) fault propagation in the network is ignored; 2) the root casual anomalies may not always be the nodes with a high-percentage of vanishing correlations; 3) temporal patterns of vanishing correlations are not exploited for robust detection. To address these limitations, in this paper we propose a network diffusion based framework to identify significant causal anomalies and rank them. Our approach can effectively model fault propagation over the entire invariant network, and can perform joint inference on both the structural, and the time-evolving broken invariance patterns. As a result, it can locate high-confidence anomalies that are truly responsible for the vanishing correlations, and can compensate for unstructured measurement noise in the system. Extensive experiments on synthetic datasets, bank information system datasets, and coal plant cyber-physical system datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

Cheng, Wei, Zhang, Kai, Chen, Haifeng, Jiang, Guofei, Chen, Zhengzhang, Wang, Wei.  2016.  Ranking Causal Anomalies via Temporal and Dynamical Analysis on Vanishing Correlations. Proceedings of the 22Nd ACM SIGKDD International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining. :805–814.

Modern world has witnessed a dramatic increase in our ability to collect, transmit and distribute real-time monitoring and surveillance data from large-scale information systems and cyber-physical systems. Detecting system anomalies thus attracts significant amount of interest in many fields such as security, fault management, and industrial optimization. Recently, invariant network has shown to be a powerful way in characterizing complex system behaviours. In the invariant network, a node represents a system component and an edge indicates a stable, significant interaction between two components. Structures and evolutions of the invariance network, in particular the vanishing correlations, can shed important light on locating causal anomalies and performing diagnosis. However, existing approaches to detect causal anomalies with the invariant network often use the percentage of vanishing correlations to rank possible casual components, which have several limitations: 1) fault propagation in the network is ignored; 2) the root casual anomalies may not always be the nodes with a high-percentage of vanishing correlations; 3) temporal patterns of vanishing correlations are not exploited for robust detection. To address these limitations, in this paper we propose a network diffusion based framework to identify significant causal anomalies and rank them. Our approach can effectively model fault propagation over the entire invariant network, and can perform joint inference on both the structural, and the time-evolving broken invariance patterns. As a result, it can locate high-confidence anomalies that are truly responsible for the vanishing correlations, and can compensate for unstructured measurement noise in the system. Extensive experiments on synthetic datasets, bank information system datasets, and coal plant cyber-physical system datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.