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Shayan, Mohammed, Bhattacharjee, Sukanta, Song, Yong-Ak, Chakrabarty, Krishnendu, Karri, Ramesh.  2019.  Can Multi-Layer Microfluidic Design Methods Aid Bio-Intellectual Property Protection? 2019 IEEE 25th International Symposium on On-Line Testing and Robust System Design (IOLTS). :151—154.
Researchers develop bioassays by rigorously experimenting in the lab. This involves significant fiscal and skilled person-hour investment. A competitor can reverse engineer a bioassay implementation by imaging or taking a video of a biochip when in use. Thus, there is a need to protect the intellectual property (IP) rights of the bioassay developer. We introduce a novel 3D multilayer-based obfuscation to protect a biochip against reverse engineering.
Shayan, Mohammed, Bhattacharjee, Sukanta, Song, Yong-Ak, Chakrabarty, Krishnendu, Karri, Ramesh.  2019.  Deceive the Attacker: Thwarting IP Theft in Sieve-Valve-based Biochips. 2019 Design, Automation Test in Europe Conference Exhibition (DATE). :210—215.

Researchers develop bioassays following rigorous experimentation in the lab that involves considerable fiscal and highly-skilled-person-hour investment. Previous work shows that a bioassay implementation can be reverse engineered by using images or video and control signals of the biochip. Hence, techniques must be devised to protect the intellectual property (IP) rights of the bioassay developer. This study is the first step in this direction and it makes the following contributions: (1) it introduces use of a sieve-valve as a security primitive to obfuscate bioassay implementations; (2) it shows how sieve-valves can be used to obscure biochip building blocks such as multiplexers and mixers; (3) it presents design rules and security metrics to design and measure obfuscated biochips. We assess the cost-security trade-offs associated with this solution and demonstrate practical sieve-valve based obfuscation on real-life biochips.