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Kabin, I., Dyka, Z., Klann, D., Mentens, N., Batina, L., Langendoerfer, P..  2020.  Breaking a fully Balanced ASIC Coprocessor Implementing Complete Addition Formulas on Weierstrass Elliptic Curves. 2020 23rd Euromicro Conference on Digital System Design (DSD). :270–276.
In this paper we report on the results of selected horizontal SCA attacks against two open-source designs that implement hardware accelerators for elliptic curve cryptography. Both designs use the complete addition formula to make the point addition and point doubling operations indistinguishable. One of the designs uses in addition means to randomize the operation sequence as a countermeasure. We used the comparison to the mean and an automated SPA to attack both designs. Despite all these countermeasures, we were able to extract the keys processed with a correctness of 100%.
Klann, D., Aftowicz, M., Kabin, I., Dyka, Z., Langendoerfer, P..  2020.  Integration and Implementation of four different Elliptic Curves in a single high-speed Design considering SCA. 2020 15th Design Technology of Integrated Systems in Nanoscale Era (DTIS). :1–2.
Modern communication systems rely heavily on cryptography to ensure authenticity, confidentiality and integrity of exchanged messages. Elliptic Curve Cryptography 1 (ECC) is one of the common used standard methods for encrypting and signing messages. In this paper we present our implementation of a design supporting four different NIST Elliptic Curves. The design supports two B-curves (B-233, B-283) and two P-curves (P-224, P-256). The implemented designs are sharing the following hardware components bus, multiplier, alu and registers. By implementing the 4 curves in a single design and reusing some resources we reduced the area 20 by 14% compared to a design without resource sharing. Compared to a pure software solution running on an Arm Cortex A9 operating at 1GHz, our design ported to a FPGA is 1.2 to 6 times faster.