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Multari, Nicholas J., Singhal, Anoop, Manz, David O..  2016.  SafeConfig'16: Testing and Evaluation for Active and Resilient Cyber Systems. Proceedings of the 2016 ACM SIGSAC Conference on Computer and Communications Security. :1871–1872.

The premise of this year's SafeConfig Workshop is existing tools and methods for security assessments are necessary but insufficient for scientifically rigorous testing and evaluation of resilient and active cyber systems. The objective for this workshop is the exploration and discussion of scientifically sound testing regimen(s) that will continuously and dynamically probe, attack, and "test" the various resilient and active technologies. This adaptation and change in focus necessitates at the very least modification, and potentially, wholesale new developments to ensure that resilient- and agile-aware security testing is available to the research community. All testing, validation and experimentation must also be repeatable, reproducible, subject to scientific scrutiny, measurable and meaningful to both researchers and practitioners.

Multari, Nicholas J., Singhal, Anoop, Manz, David O., Cowles, Robert, Cuellar, Jorge, Oehmen, Christopher, Shannon, Gregory.  2016.  SafeConfig'16: Testing and Evaluation for Active & Resilient Cyber Systems Panel Verification of Active and Resilient Systems: Practical or Utopian? Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Workshop on Automated Decision Making for Active Cyber Defense. :53–53.

The premise of the SafeConfig'16 Workshop is existing tools and methods for security assessments are necessary but insufficient for scientifically rigorous testing and evaluation of resilient and active cyber systems. The objective for this workshop is the exploration and discussion of scientifically sound testing regimen(s) that will continuously and dynamically probe, attack, and "test" the various resilient and active technologies. This adaptation and change in focus necessitates at the very least modification, and potentially, wholesale new developments to ensure that resilient- and agile-aware security testing is available to the research community. All testing, validation and experimentation must also be repeatable, reproducible, subject to scientific scrutiny, measurable and meaningful to both researchers and practitioners. The workshop will convene a panel of experts to explore this concept. The topic will be discussed from three different perspectives. One perspective is that of the practitioner. We will explore whether active and resilient technologies are or are planned for deployment and whether the verification methodology affects that decision. The second perspective will be that of the research community. We will address the shortcomings of current approaches and the research directions needed to address the practitioner's concerns. The third perspective is that of the policy community. Specifically, we will explore the dynamics between technology, verification, and policy.

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Sun, Xiaoyan, Dai, Jun, Liu, Peng, Singhal, Anoop, Yen, John.  2016.  Towards probabilistic identification of zero-day attack paths. 2016 IEEE Conference on Communications and Network Security (CNS). :64–72.
Zero-day attacks continue to challenge the enterprise network security defense. A zero-day attack path is formed when a multi-step attack contains one or more zero-day exploits. Detecting zero-day attack paths in time could enable early disclosure of zero-day threats. In this paper, we propose a probabilistic approach to identify zero-day attack paths and implement a prototype system named ZePro. An object instance graph is first built from system calls to capture the intrusion propagation. To further reveal the zero-day attack paths hiding in the instance graph, our system constructs an instance-graph-based Bayesian network. By leveraging intrusion evidence, the Bayesian network can quantitatively compute the probabilities of object instances being infected. The object instances with high infection probabilities reveal themselves and form the zero-day attack paths. The experiment results show that our system can effectively identify zero-day attack paths.