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Multari, Nicholas J., Singhal, Anoop, Manz, David O..  2016.  SafeConfig'16: Testing and Evaluation for Active and Resilient Cyber Systems. Proceedings of the 2016 ACM SIGSAC Conference on Computer and Communications Security. :1871–1872.

The premise of this year's SafeConfig Workshop is existing tools and methods for security assessments are necessary but insufficient for scientifically rigorous testing and evaluation of resilient and active cyber systems. The objective for this workshop is the exploration and discussion of scientifically sound testing regimen(s) that will continuously and dynamically probe, attack, and "test" the various resilient and active technologies. This adaptation and change in focus necessitates at the very least modification, and potentially, wholesale new developments to ensure that resilient- and agile-aware security testing is available to the research community. All testing, validation and experimentation must also be repeatable, reproducible, subject to scientific scrutiny, measurable and meaningful to both researchers and practitioners.

Multari, Nicholas J., Singhal, Anoop, Manz, David O., Cowles, Robert, Cuellar, Jorge, Oehmen, Christopher, Shannon, Gregory.  2016.  SafeConfig'16: Testing and Evaluation for Active & Resilient Cyber Systems Panel Verification of Active and Resilient Systems: Practical or Utopian? Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Workshop on Automated Decision Making for Active Cyber Defense. :53–53.

The premise of the SafeConfig'16 Workshop is existing tools and methods for security assessments are necessary but insufficient for scientifically rigorous testing and evaluation of resilient and active cyber systems. The objective for this workshop is the exploration and discussion of scientifically sound testing regimen(s) that will continuously and dynamically probe, attack, and "test" the various resilient and active technologies. This adaptation and change in focus necessitates at the very least modification, and potentially, wholesale new developments to ensure that resilient- and agile-aware security testing is available to the research community. All testing, validation and experimentation must also be repeatable, reproducible, subject to scientific scrutiny, measurable and meaningful to both researchers and practitioners. The workshop will convene a panel of experts to explore this concept. The topic will be discussed from three different perspectives. One perspective is that of the practitioner. We will explore whether active and resilient technologies are or are planned for deployment and whether the verification methodology affects that decision. The second perspective will be that of the research community. We will address the shortcomings of current approaches and the research directions needed to address the practitioner's concerns. The third perspective is that of the policy community. Specifically, we will explore the dynamics between technology, verification, and policy.

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Schroeder, Jill M., Manz, David O., Amaya, Jodi P., McMakin, Andrea H., Bays, Ryan M..  2018.  Understanding Past, Current and Future Communication and Situational Awareness Technologies for First Responders. Proceedings of the Fifth Cybersecurity Symposium. :2:1-2:14.
This study builds a foundation for improving research for first responder communication and situational awareness technology in the future. In an online survey, we elicited the opinions of 250 U.S. first responders about effectiveness, security, and reliability of past, current, and future Internet of Things technology. The most desired features respondents identified were connectivity, reliability, interoperability, and affordability. The top barriers to technology adoption and use included restricted budgets/costs, interoperability, insufficient training resources, and insufficient interagency collaboration and communication. First responders in all job types indicated that technology has made first responder equipment more useful, and technology that supports situational awareness is particularly valued. As such, future Internet of Things capabilities, such as tapping into smart device data in residences and piggybacking onto alternative communication channels, could be valuable for future first responders. Potential areas for future investigation are suggested for technology development and research.