Visible to the public Biblio

Filters: Author is Sinanoglu, Ozgur  [Clear All Filters]
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 
B
Patnaik, Satwik, Ashraf, Mohammed, Sinanoglu, Ozgur, Knechtel, Johann.  2018.  Best of Both Worlds: Integration of Split Manufacturing and Camouflaging into a Security-Driven CAD Flow for 3D ICs. 2018 IEEE/ACM International Conference on Computer-Aided Design (ICCAD). :1—8.

With the globalization of manufacturing and supply chains, ensuring the security and trustworthiness of ICs has become an urgent challenge. Split manufacturing (SM) and layout camouflaging (LC) are promising techniques to protect the intellectual property (IP) of ICs from malicious entities during and after manufacturing (i.e., from untrusted foundries and reverse-engineering by end-users). In this paper, we strive for “the best of both worlds,” that is of SM and LC. To do so, we extend both techniques towards 3D integration, an up-and-coming design and manufacturing paradigm based on stacking and interconnecting of multiple chips/dies/tiers. Initially, we review prior art and their limitations. We also put forward a novel, practical threat model of IP piracy which is in line with the business models of present-day design houses. Next, we discuss how 3D integration is a naturally strong match to combine SM and LC. We propose a security-driven CAD and manufacturing flow for face-to-face (F2F) 3D ICs, along with obfuscation of interconnects. Based on this CAD flow, we conduct comprehensive experiments on DRC-clean layouts. Strengthened by an extensive security analysis (also based on a novel attack to recover obfuscated F2F interconnects), we argue that entering the next, third dimension is eminent for effective and efficient IP protection.

P
Yasin, Muhammad, Sengupta, Abhrajit, Nabeel, Mohammed Thari, Ashraf, Mohammed, Rajendran, Jeyavijayan(JV), Sinanoglu, Ozgur.  2017.  Provably-Secure Logic Locking: From Theory To Practice. Proceedings of the 2017 ACM SIGSAC Conference on Computer and Communications Security. :1601–1618.

Logic locking has been conceived as a promising proactive defense strategy against intellectual property (IP) piracy, counterfeiting, hardware Trojans, reverse engineering, and overbuilding attacks. Yet, various attacks that use a working chip as an oracle have been launched on logic locking to successfully retrieve its secret key, undermining the defense of all existing locking techniques. In this paper, we propose stripped-functionality logic locking (SFLL), which strips some of the functionality of the design and hides it in the form of a secret key(s), thereby rendering on-chip implementation functionally different from the original one. When loaded onto an on-chip memory, the secret keys restore the original functionality of the design. Through security-aware synthesis that creates a controllable mismatch between the reverse-engineered netlist and original design, SFLL provides a quantifiable and provable resilience trade-off between all known and anticipated attacks. We demonstrate the application of SFLL to large designs (textgreater100K gates) using a computer-aided design (CAD) framework that ensures attaining the desired security level at minimal implementation cost, 8%, 5%, and 0.5% for area, power, and delay, respectively. In addition to theoretical proofs and simulation confirmation of SFLL's security, we also report results from the silicon implementation of SFLL on an ARM Cortex-M0 microprocessor in 65nm technology.

R
Limaye, Nimisha, Sengupta, Abhrajit, Nabeel, Mohammed, Sinanoglu, Ozgur.  2019.  Is Robust Design-for-Security Robust Enough? Attack on Locked Circuits with Restricted Scan Chain Access 2019 IEEE/ACM International Conference on Computer-Aided Design (ICCAD). :1–8.
The security of logic locking has been called into question by various attacks, especially a Boolean satisfiability (SAT) based attack, that exploits scan access in a working chip. Among other techniques, a robust design-for-security (DFS) architecture was presented to restrict any unauthorized scan access, thereby, thwarting the SAT attack (or any other attack that relies on scan access). Nevertheless, in this work, we successfully break this technique by recovering the secret key despite the lack of scan access. Our security analysis on a few benchmark circuits protected by the robust DFS architecture demonstrates the effectiveness of our attack; on average 95% of the key bits are correctly recovered, and almost 100% in most cases. To overcome this and other prevailing attacks, we propose a defense by making fundamental changes to the robust DFS technique; the new defense can withstand all logic locking attacks. We observe, on average, lower area overhead ( 1.65%) than the robust DFS design ( 5.15%), and similar test coverage ( 99.88%).
S
Ali, Sk Subidh, Ibrahim, Mohamed, Sinanoglu, Ozgur, Chakrabarty, Krishnendu, Karri, Ramesh.  2016.  Security Assessment of Cyberphysical Digital Microfluidic Biochips. IEEE/ACM Trans. Comput. Biol. Bioinformatics. 13:445–458.

A digital microfluidic biochip (DMFB) is an emerging technology that enables miniaturized analysis systems for point-of-care clinical diagnostics, DNA sequencing, and environmental monitoring. A DMFB reduces the rate of sample and reagent consumption, and automates the analysis of assays. In this paper, we provide the first assessment of the security vulnerabilities of DMFBs. We identify result-manipulation attacks on a DMFB that maliciously alter the assay outcomes. Two practical result-manipulation attacks are shown on a DMFB platform performing enzymatic glucose assay on serum. In the first attack, the attacker adjusts the concentration of the glucose sample and thereby modifies the final result. In the second attack, the attacker tampers with the calibration curve of the assay operation. We then identify denial-of-service attacks, where the attacker can disrupt the assay operation by tampering either with the droplet-routing algorithm or with the actuation sequence. We demonstrate these attacks using a digital microfluidic synthesis simulator. The results show that the attacks are easy to implement and hard to detect. Therefore, this work highlights the need for effective protections against malicious modifications in DMFBs.

W
Yasin, Muhammad, Sengupta, Abhrajit, Schafer, Benjamin Carrion, Makris, Yiorgos, Sinanoglu, Ozgur, Rajendran, Jeyavijayan(JV).  2017.  What to Lock?: Functional and Parametric Locking Proceedings of the on Great Lakes Symposium on VLSI 2017. :351–356.

Logic locking is an intellectual property (IP) protection technique that prevents IP piracy, reverse engineering and overbuilding attacks by the untrusted foundry or end-users. Existing logic locking techniques are all based on locking the functionality; the design/chip is nonfunctional unless the secret key has been loaded. Existing techniques are vulnerable to various attacks, such as sensitization, key-pruning, and signal skew analysis enabled removal attacks. In this paper, we propose a tenacious and traceless logic locking technique, TTlock, that locks functionality and provably withstands all known attacks, such as SAT-based, sensitization, removal, etc. TTLock protects a secret input pattern; the output of a logic cone is flipped for that pattern, where this flip is restored only when the correct key is applied. Experimental results confirm our theoretical expectations that the computational complexity of attacks launched on TTLock grows exponentially with increasing key-size, while the area, power, and delay overhead increases only linearly. In this paper, we also coin ``parametric locking," where the design/chip behaves as per its specifications (performance, power, reliability, etc.) only with the secret key in place, and an incorrect key downgrades its parametric characteristics. We discuss objectives and challenges in parametric locking.