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Stan, Orly, Cohen, Adi, Elovici, Yuval, Shabtai, Asaf.  2020.  Intrusion Detection System for the MIL-STD-1553 Communication Bus. IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems. 56:3010–3027.
MIL-STD-1553 is a military standard that defines the specification of a serial communication bus that has been implemented in military and aerospace avionic platforms for over 40 years. MIL-STD-1553 was designed for a high level of fault tolerance while less attention was paid to cyber security issues. Thus, as indicated in recent studies, it is exposed to various threats. In this article, we suggest enhancing the security of MIL-STD-1553 communication buses by integrating a machine learning-based intrusion detection system (IDS); such anIDS will be capable of detecting cyber attacks in real time. The IDS consists of two modules: 1) a remote terminal (RT) authentication module that detects illegitimately connected components and data transfers and 2) a sequence-based anomaly detection module that detects anomalies in the operation of the system. The IDS showed high detection rates for both normal and abnormal behavior when evaluated in a testbed using real 1553 hardware, as well as a very fast and accurate training process using logs from a real system. The RT authentication module managed to authenticate RTs with +0.99 precision and +0.98 recall; and detect illegitimate component (or a legitimate component that impersonates other components) with +0.98 precision and +0.99 recall. The sequence-based anomaly detection module managed to perfectly detect both normal and abnormal behavior. Moreover, the sequencebased anomaly detection module managed to accurately (i.e., zero false positives) model the normal behavior of a real system in a short period of time ( 22 s).
Siboni, Shachar, Shabtai, Asaf, Elovici, Yuval.  2018.  An Attack Scenario and Mitigation Mechanism for Enterprise BYOD Environments. SIGAPP Appl. Comput. Rev.. 18:5–21.

The recent proliferation of the Internet of Things (IoT) technology poses major security and privacy concerns. Specifically, the use of personal IoT devices, such as tablets, smartphones, and even smartwatches, as part of the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) trend, may result in severe network security breaches in enterprise environments. Such devices increase the attack surface by weakening the digital perimeter of the enterprise network and opening new points of entry for malicious activities. In this paper we demonstrate a novel attack scenario in an enterprise environment by exploiting the smartwatch device of an innocent employee. Using a malicious application running on a suitable smartwatch, the device imitates a real Wi-Fi direct printer service in the network. Using this attack scenario, we illustrate how an advanced attacker located outside of the organization can leak/steal sensitive information from the organization by utilizing the compromised smartwatch as a means of attack. An attack mitigation process and countermeasures are suggested in order to limit the capability of the remote attacker to execute the attack on the network, thus minimizing the data leakage by the smartwatch.

Sachidananda, Vinay, Siboni, Shachar, Shabtai, Asaf, Toh, Jinghui, Bhairav, Suhas, Elovici, Yuval.  2017.  Let the Cat Out of the Bag: A Holistic Approach Towards Security Analysis of the Internet of Things. Proceedings of the 3rd ACM International Workshop on IoT Privacy, Trust, and Security. :3–10.

The exponential increase of Internet of Things (IoT) devices have resulted in a range of new and unanticipated vulnerabilities associated with their use. IoT devices from smart homes to smart enterprises can easily be compromised. One of the major problems associated with the IoT is maintaining security; the vulnerable nature of IoT devices poses a challenge to many aspects of security, including security testing and analysis. It is trivial to perform the security analysis for IoT devices to understand the loop holes and very nature of the devices itself. Given these issues, there has been less emphasis on security testing and analysis of the IoT. In this paper, we show our preliminary efforts in the area of security analysis for IoT devices and introduce a security IoT testbed for performing security analysis. We also discuss the necessary design, requirements and the architecture to support our security analysis conducted via the proposed testbed.

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Nahmias, Daniel, Cohen, Aviad, Nissim, Nir, Elovici, Yuval.  2019.  TrustSign: Trusted Malware Signature Generation in Private Clouds Using Deep Feature Transfer Learning. 2019 International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN). :1—8.

This paper presents TrustSign, a novel, trusted automatic malware signature generation method based on high-level deep features transferred from a VGG-19 neural network model pre-trained on the ImageNet dataset. While traditional automatic malware signature generation techniques rely on static or dynamic analysis of the malware's executable, our method overcomes the limitations associated with these techniques by producing signatures based on the presence of the malicious process in the volatile memory. Signatures generated using TrustSign well represent the real malware behavior during runtime. By leveraging the cloud's virtualization technology, TrustSign analyzes the malicious process in a trusted manner, since the malware is unaware and cannot interfere with the inspection procedure. Additionally, by removing the dependency on the malware's executable, our method is capable of signing fileless malware. Thus, we focus our research on in-browser cryptojacking attacks, which current antivirus solutions have difficulty to detect. However, TrustSign is not limited to cryptojacking attacks, as our evaluation included various ransomware samples. TrustSign's signature generation process does not require feature engineering or any additional model training, and it is done in a completely unsupervised manner, obviating the need for a human expert. Therefore, our method has the advantage of dramatically reducing signature generation and distribution time. The results of our experimental evaluation demonstrate TrustSign's ability to generate signatures invariant to the process state over time. By using the signatures generated by TrustSign as input for various supervised classifiers, we achieved 99.5% classification accuracy.

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Mirsky, Yisroel, Shabtai, Asaf, Rokach, Lior, Shapira, Bracha, Elovici, Yuval.  2016.  SherLock vs Moriarty: A Smartphone Dataset for Cybersecurity Research. Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Workshop on Artificial Intelligence and Security. :1–12.

In this paper we describe and share with the research community, a significant smartphone dataset obtained from an ongoing long-term data collection experiment. The dataset currently contains 10 billion data records from 30 users collected over a period of 1.6 years and an additional 20 users for 6 months (totaling 50 active users currently participating in the experiment). The experiment involves two smartphone agents: SherLock and Moriarty. SherLock collects a wide variety of software and sensor data at a high sample rate. Moriarty perpetrates various attacks on the user and logs its activities, thus providing labels for the SherLock dataset. The primary purpose of the dataset is to help security professionals and academic researchers in developing innovative methods of implicitly detecting malicious behavior in smartphones. Specifically, from data obtainable without superuser (root) privileges. To demonstrate possible uses of the dataset, we perform a basic malware analysis and evaluate a method of continuous user authentication.

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Guri, Mordechai, Zadov, Boris, Bykhovsky, Dima, Elovici, Yuval.  2019.  CTRL-ALT-LED: Leaking Data from Air-Gapped Computers Via Keyboard LEDs. 2019 IEEE 43rd Annual Computer Software and Applications Conference (COMPSAC). 1:801—810.
Using the keyboard LEDs to send data optically was proposed in 2002 by Loughry and Umphress [1] (Appendix A). In this paper we extensively explore this threat in the context of a modern cyber-attack with current hardware and optical equipment. In this type of attack, an advanced persistent threat (APT) uses the keyboard LEDs (Caps-Lock, Num-Lock and Scroll-Lock) to encode information and exfiltrate data from airgapped computers optically. Notably, this exfiltration channel is not monitored by existing data leakage prevention (DLP) systems. We examine this attack and its boundaries for today's keyboards with USB controllers and sensitive optical sensors. We also introduce smartphone and smartwatch cameras as components of malicious insider and 'evil maid' attacks. We provide the necessary scientific background on optical communication and the characteristics of modern USB keyboards at the hardware and software level, and present a transmission protocol and modulation schemes. We implement the exfiltration malware, discuss its design and implementation issues, and evaluate it with different types of keyboards. We also test various receivers, including light sensors, remote cameras, 'extreme' cameras, security cameras, and smartphone cameras. Our experiment shows that data can be leaked from air-gapped computers via the keyboard LEDs at a maximum bit rate of 3000 bit/sec per LED given a light sensor as a receiver, and more than 120 bit/sec if smartphones are used. The attack doesn't require any modification of the keyboard at hardware or firmware levels.
Guri, Mordechai, Bykhovsky, Dima, Elovici, Yuval.  2019.  Brightness: Leaking Sensitive Data from Air-Gapped Workstations via Screen Brightness. 2019 12th CMI Conference on Cybersecurity and Privacy (CMI). :1—6.
Air-gapped computers are systems that are kept isolated from the Internet since they store or process sensitive information. In this paper, we introduce an optical covert channel in which an attacker can leak (or, exfiltlrate) sensitive information from air-gapped computers through manipulations on the screen brightness. This covert channel is invisible and it works even while the user is working on the computer. Malware on a compromised computer can obtain sensitive data (e.g., files, images, encryption keys and passwords), and modulate it within the screen brightness, invisible to users. The small changes in the brightness are invisible to humans but can be recovered from video streams taken by cameras such as a local security camera, smartphone camera or a webcam. We present related work and discuss the technical and scientific background of this covert channel. We examined the channel's boundaries under various parameters, with different types of computer and TV screens, and at several distances. We also tested different types of camera receivers to demonstrate the covert channel. Lastly, we present relevant countermeasures to this type of attack.
Guarnizo, Juan David, Tambe, Amit, Bhunia, Suman Sankar, Ochoa, Martin, Tippenhauer, Nils Ole, Shabtai, Asaf, Elovici, Yuval.  2017.  SIPHON: Towards Scalable High-Interaction Physical Honeypots. Proceedings of the 3rd ACM Workshop on Cyber-Physical System Security. :57–68.

In recent years, the emerging Internet-of-Things (IoT) has led to rising concerns about the security of networked embedded devices. In this work, we propose the SIPHON architecture–-a Scalable high-Interaction Honeypot platform for IoT devices. Our architecture leverages IoT devices that are physically at one location and are connected to the Internet through so-called $\backslash$emph\wormholes\ distributed around the world. The resulting architecture allows exposing few physical devices over a large number of geographically distributed IP addresses. We demonstrate the proposed architecture in a large scale experiment with 39 wormhole instances in 16 cities in 9 countries. Based on this setup, five physical IP cameras, one NVR and one IP printer are presented as 85 real IoT devices on the Internet, attracting a daily traffic of 700MB for a period of two months. A preliminary analysis of the collected traffic indicates that devices in some cities attracted significantly more traffic than others (ranging from 600 000 incoming TCP connections for the most popular destination to less than 50 000 for the least popular). We recorded over 400 brute-force login attempts to the web-interface of our devices using a total of 1826 distinct credentials, from which 11 attempts were successful. Moreover, we noted login attempts to Telnet and SSH ports some of which used credentials found in the recently disclosed Mirai malware.

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Ami, Or, Elovici, Yuval, Hendler, Danny.  2018.  Ransomware Prevention Using Application Authentication-Based File Access Control. Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Symposium on Applied Computing. :1610-1619.

Ransomware emerged in recent years as one of the most significant cyber threats facing both individuals and organizations, inflicting global damage costs that are estimated upwards of $1 billion in 2016 alone [23]. The increase in the scale and impact of recent ransomware attacks highlights the need of finding effective countermeasures. We present AntiBotics - a novel system for application authentication-based file access control. AntiBotics enforces a file access-control policy by presenting periodic identification/authorization challenges.

We implemented AntiBotics for Windows. Our experimental evaluation shows that contemporary ransomware programs are unable to encrypt any of the files protected by AntiBotics and that the daily rate of challenges it presents to users is very low. We discuss possible ways in which future ransomware may attempt to attack AntiBotics and explain how these attacks can be thwarted.