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2019-09-09
Kesidis, G., Shan, Y., Fleck, D., Stavrou, A., Konstantopoulos, T..  2018.  An adversarial coupon-collector model of asynchronous moving-target defense against botnet reconnaissance*. 2018 13th International Conference on Malicious and Unwanted Software (MALWARE). :61–67.
We consider a moving-target defense of a proxied multiserver tenant of the cloud where the proxies dynamically change to defeat reconnaissance activity by a botnet planning a DDoS attack targeting the tenant. Unlike the system of [4] where all proxies change simultaneously at a fixed rate, we consider a more “responsive” system where the proxies may change more rapidly and selectively based on the current session request intensity, which is expected to be abnormally large during active reconnaissance. In this paper, we study a tractable “adversarial” coupon-collector model wherein proxies change after a random period of time from the latest request, i.e., asynchronously. In addition to determining the stationary mean number of proxies discovered by the attacker, we study the age of a proxy (coupon type) when it has been identified (requested) by the botnet. This gives us the rate at which proxies change (cost to the defender) when the nominal client request load is relatively negligible.
2019-07-01
Akhtar, T., Gupta, B. B., Yamaguchi, S..  2018.  Malware propagation effects on SCADA system and smart power grid. 2018 IEEE International Conference on Consumer Electronics (ICCE). :1–6.

Critical infrastructures have suffered from different kind of cyber attacks over the years. Many of these attacks are performed using malwares by exploiting the vulnerabilities of these resources. Smart power grid is one of the major victim which suffered from these attacks and its SCADA system are frequently targeted. In this paper we describe our proposed framework to analyze smart power grid, while its SCADA system is under attack by malware. Malware propagation and its effects on SCADA system is the focal point of our analysis. OMNeT++ simulator and openDSS is used for developing and analyzing the simulated smart power grid environment.

Amjad, N., Afzal, H., Amjad, M. F., Khan, F. A..  2018.  A Multi-Classifier Framework for Open Source Malware Forensics. 2018 IEEE 27th International Conference on Enabling Technologies: Infrastructure for Collaborative Enterprises (WETICE). :106-111.

Traditional anti-virus technologies have failed to keep pace with proliferation of malware due to slow process of their signatures and heuristics updates. Similarly, there are limitations of time and resources in order to perform manual analysis on each malware. There is a need to learn from this vast quantity of data, containing cyber attack pattern, in an automated manner to proactively adapt to ever-evolving threats. Machine learning offers unique advantages to learn from past cyber attacks to handle future cyber threats. The purpose of this research is to propose a framework for multi-classification of malware into well-known categories by applying different machine learning models over corpus of malware analysis reports. These reports are generated through an open source malware sandbox in an automated manner. We applied extensive pre-modeling techniques for data cleaning, features exploration and features engineering to prepare training and test datasets. Best possible hyper-parameters are selected to build machine learning models. These prepared datasets are then used to train the machine learning classifiers and to compare their prediction accuracy. Finally, these results are validated through a comprehensive 10-fold cross-validation methodology. The best results are achieved through Gaussian Naive Bayes classifier with random accuracy of 96% and 10-Fold Cross Validation accuracy of 91.2%. The said framework can be deployed in an operational environment to learn from malware attacks for proactively adapting matching counter measures.

2019-06-24
Stokes, J. W., Wang, D., Marinescu, M., Marino, M., Bussone, B..  2018.  Attack and Defense of Dynamic Analysis-Based, Adversarial Neural Malware Detection Models. MILCOM 2018 - 2018 IEEE Military Communications Conference (MILCOM). :1–8.

Recently researchers have proposed using deep learning-based systems for malware detection. Unfortunately, all deep learning classification systems are vulnerable to adversarial learning-based attacks, or adversarial attacks, where miscreants can avoid detection by the classification algorithm with very few perturbations of the input data. Previous work has studied adversarial attacks against static analysis-based malware classifiers which only classify the content of the unknown file without execution. However, since the majority of malware is either packed or encrypted, malware classification based on static analysis often fails to detect these types of files. To overcome this limitation, anti-malware companies typically perform dynamic analysis by emulating each file in the anti-malware engine or performing in-depth scanning in a virtual machine. These strategies allow the analysis of the malware after unpacking or decryption. In this work, we study different strategies of crafting adversarial samples for dynamic analysis. These strategies operate on sparse, binary inputs in contrast to continuous inputs such as pixels in images. We then study the effects of two, previously proposed defensive mechanisms against crafted adversarial samples including the distillation and ensemble defenses. We also propose and evaluate the weight decay defense. Experiments show that with these three defenses, the number of successfully crafted adversarial samples is reduced compared to an unprotected baseline system. In particular, the ensemble defense is the most resilient to adversarial attacks. Importantly, none of the defenses significantly reduce the classification accuracy for detecting malware. Finally, we show that while adding additional hidden layers to neural models does not significantly improve the malware classification accuracy, it does significantly increase the classifier's robustness to adversarial attacks.

Ijaz, M., Durad, M. H., Ismail, M..  2019.  Static and Dynamic Malware Analysis Using Machine Learning. 2019 16th International Bhurban Conference on Applied Sciences and Technology (IBCAST). :687–691.

Malware detection is an indispensable factor in security of internet oriented machines. The combinations of different features are used for dynamic malware analysis. The different combinations are generated from APIs, Summary Information, DLLs and Registry Keys Changed. Cuckoo sandbox is used for dynamic malware analysis, which is customizable, and provide good accuracy. More than 2300 features are extracted from dynamic analysis of malware and 92 features are extracted statically from binary malware using PEFILE. Static features are extracted from 39000 malicious binaries and 10000 benign files. Dynamically 800 benign files and 2200 malware files are analyzed in Cuckoo Sandbox and 2300 features are extracted. The accuracy of dynamic malware analysis is 94.64% while static analysis accuracy is 99.36%. The dynamic malware analysis is not effective due to tricky and intelligent behaviours of malwares. The dynamic analysis has some limitations due to controlled network behavior and it cannot be analyzed completely due to limited access of network.

Wright, D., Stroschein, J..  2018.  A Malware Analysis and Artifact Capture Tool. 2018 IEEE 16th Intl Conf on Dependable, Autonomic and Secure Computing, 16th Intl Conf on Pervasive Intelligence and Computing, 4th Intl Conf on Big Data Intelligence and Computing and Cyber Science and Technology Congress(DASC/PiCom/DataCom/CyberSciTech). :328–333.

Malware authors attempt to obfuscate and hide their code in its static and dynamic states. This paper provides a novel approach to aid analysis by intercepting and capturing malware artifacts and providing dynamic control of process flow. Capturing malware artifacts allows an analyst to more quickly and comprehensively understand malware behavior and obfuscation techniques and doing so interactively allows multiple code paths to be explored. The faster that malware can be analyzed the quicker the systems and data compromised by it can be determined and its infection stopped. This research proposes an instantiation of an interactive malware analysis and artifact capture tool.

Naeem, H., Guo, B., Naeem, M. R..  2018.  A light-weight malware static visual analysis for IoT infrastructure. 2018 International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Big Data (ICAIBD). :240–244.

Recently a huge trend on the internet of things (IoT) and an exponential increase in automated tools are helping malware producers to target IoT devices. The traditional security solutions against malware are infeasible due to low computing power for large-scale data in IoT environment. The number of malware and their variants are increasing due to continuous malware attacks. Consequently, the performance improvement in malware analysis is critical requirement to stop rapid expansion of malicious attacks in IoT environment. To solve this problem, the paper proposed a novel framework for classifying malware in IoT environment. To achieve flne-grained malware classification in suggested framework, the malware image classification system (MICS) is designed for representing malware image globally and locally. MICS first converts the suspicious program into the gray-scale image and then captures hybrid local and global malware features to perform malware family classification. Preliminary experimental outcomes of MICS are quite promising with 97.4% classification accuracy on 9342 windows suspicious programs of 25 families. The experimental results indicate that proposed framework is quite capable to process large-scale IoT malware.

Qbeitah, M. A., Aldwairi, M..  2018.  Dynamic malware analysis of phishing emails. 2018 9th International Conference on Information and Communication Systems (ICICS). :18–24.

Malicious software or malware is one of the most significant dangers facing the Internet today. In the fight against malware, users depend on anti-malware and anti-virus products to proactively detect threats before damage is done. Those products rely on static signatures obtained through malware analysis. Unfortunately, malware authors are always one step ahead in avoiding detection. This research deals with dynamic malware analysis, which emphasizes on: how the malware will behave after execution, what changes to the operating system, registry and network communication take place. Dynamic analysis opens up the doors for automatic generation of anomaly and active signatures based on the new malware's behavior. The research includes a design of honeypot to capture new malware and a complete dynamic analysis laboratory setting. We propose a standard analysis methodology by preparing the analysis tools, then running the malicious samples in a controlled environment to investigate their behavior. We analyze 173 recent Phishing emails and 45 SPIM messages in search for potentially new malwares, we present two malware samples and their comprehensive dynamic analysis.

2019-06-10
Tran, T. K., Sato, H., Kubo, M..  2018.  One-Shot Learning Approach for Unknown Malware Classification. 2018 5th Asian Conference on Defense Technology (ACDT). :8-13.

Early detection of new kinds of malware always plays an important role in defending the network systems. Especially, if intelligent protection systems could themselves detect an existence of new malware types in their system, even with a very small number of malware samples, it must be a huge benefit for the organization as well as the social since it help preventing the spreading of that kind of malware. To deal with learning from few samples, term ``one-shot learning'' or ``fewshot learning'' was introduced, and mostly used in computer vision to recognize images, handwriting, etc. An approach introduced in this paper takes advantage of One-shot learning algorithms in solving the malware classification problem by using Memory Augmented Neural Network in combination with malware's API calls sequence, which is a very valuable source of information for identifying malware behavior. In addition, it also use some advantages of the development in Natural Language Processing field such as word2vec, etc. to convert those API sequences to numeric vectors before feeding to the one-shot learning network. The results confirm very good accuracies compared to the other traditional methods.

Kargaard, J., Drange, T., Kor, A., Twafik, H., Butterfield, E..  2018.  Defending IT Systems against Intelligent Malware. 2018 IEEE 9th International Conference on Dependable Systems, Services and Technologies (DESSERT). :411-417.

The increasing amount of malware variants seen in the wild is causing problems for Antivirus Software vendors, unable to keep up by creating signatures for each. The methods used to develop a signature, static and dynamic analysis, have various limitations. Machine learning has been used by Antivirus vendors to detect malware based on the information gathered from the analysis process. However, adversarial examples can cause machine learning algorithms to miss-classify new data. In this paper we describe a method for malware analysis by converting malware binaries to images and then preparing those images for training within a Generative Adversarial Network. These unsupervised deep neural networks are not susceptible to adversarial examples. The conversion to images from malware binaries should be faster than using dynamic analysis and it would still be possible to link malware families together. Using the Generative Adversarial Network, malware detection could be much more effective and reliable.

Roseline, S. A., Geetha, S..  2018.  Intelligent Malware Detection Using Oblique Random Forest Paradigm. 2018 International Conference on Advances in Computing, Communications and Informatics (ICACCI). :330-336.

With the increase in the popularity of computerized online applications, the analysis, and detection of a growing number of newly discovered stealthy malware poses a significant challenge to the security community. Signature-based and behavior-based detection techniques are becoming inefficient in detecting new unknown malware. Machine learning solutions are employed to counter such intelligent malware and allow performing more comprehensive malware detection. This capability leads to an automatic analysis of malware behavior. The proposed oblique random forest ensemble learning technique is efficient for malware classification. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated with three malware classification datasets from various sources. The results are compared with other variants of decision tree learning models. The proposed system performs better than the existing system in terms of classification accuracy and false positive rate.

Udayakumar, N., Saglani, V. J., Cupta, A. V., Subbulakshmi, T..  2018.  Malware Classification Using Machine Learning Algorithms. 2018 2nd International Conference on Trends in Electronics and Informatics (ICOEI). :1-9.

Lately, we are facing the Malware crisis due to various types of malware or malicious programs or scripts available in the huge virtual world - the Internet. But, what is malware? Malware can be a malicious software or a program or a script which can be harmful to the user's computer. These malicious programs can perform a variety of functions, including stealing, encrypting or deleting sensitive data, altering or hijacking core computing functions and monitoring users' computer activity without their permission. There are various entry points for these programs and scripts in the user environment, but only one way to remove them is to find them and kick them out of the system which isn't an easy job as these small piece of script or code can be anywhere in the user system. This paper involves the understanding of different types of malware and how we will use Machine Learning to detect these malwares.

Jiang, J., Yin, Q., Shi, Z., Li, M..  2018.  Comprehensive Behavior Profiling Model for Malware Classification. 2018 IEEE Symposium on Computers and Communications (ISCC). :00129-00135.

In view of the great threat posed by malware and the rapid growing trend about malware variants, it is necessary to determine the category of new samples accurately for further analysis and taking appropriate countermeasures. The network behavior based classification methods have become more popular now. However, the behavior profiling models they used usually only depict partial network behavior of samples or require specific traffic selection in advance, which may lead to adverse effects on categorizing advanced malware with complex activities. In this paper, to overcome the shortages of traditional models, we raise a comprehensive behavior model for profiling the behavior of malware network activities. And we also propose a corresponding malware classification method which can extract and compare the major behavior of samples. The experimental and comparison results not only demonstrate our method can categorize samples accurately in both criteria, but also prove the advantage of our profiling model to two other approaches in accuracy performance, especially under scenario based criteria.

Kim, C. H., Kabanga, E. K., Kang, S..  2018.  Classifying Malware Using Convolutional Gated Neural Network. 2018 20th International Conference on Advanced Communication Technology (ICACT). :40-44.

Malware or Malicious Software, are an important threat to information technology society. Deep Neural Network has been recently achieving a great performance for the tasks of malware detection and classification. In this paper, we propose a convolutional gated recurrent neural network model that is capable of classifying malware to their respective families. The model is applied to a set of malware divided into 9 different families and that have been proposed during the Microsoft Malware Classification Challenge in 2015. The model shows an accuracy of 92.6% on the available dataset.

Kalash, M., Rochan, M., Mohammed, N., Bruce, N. D. B., Wang, Y., Iqbal, F..  2018.  Malware Classification with Deep Convolutional Neural Networks. 2018 9th IFIP International Conference on New Technologies, Mobility and Security (NTMS). :1-5.

In this paper, we propose a deep learning framework for malware classification. There has been a huge increase in the volume of malware in recent years which poses a serious security threat to financial institutions, businesses and individuals. In order to combat the proliferation of malware, new strategies are essential to quickly identify and classify malware samples so that their behavior can be analyzed. Machine learning approaches are becoming popular for classifying malware, however, most of the existing machine learning methods for malware classification use shallow learning algorithms (e.g. SVM). Recently, Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN), a deep learning approach, have shown superior performance compared to traditional learning algorithms, especially in tasks such as image classification. Motivated by this success, we propose a CNN-based architecture to classify malware samples. We convert malware binaries to grayscale images and subsequently train a CNN for classification. Experiments on two challenging malware classification datasets, Malimg and Microsoft malware, demonstrate that our method achieves better than the state-of-the-art performance. The proposed method achieves 98.52% and 99.97% accuracy on the Malimg and Microsoft datasets respectively.

Kornish, D., Geary, J., Sansing, V., Ezekiel, S., Pearlstein, L., Njilla, L..  2018.  Malware Classification Using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks. 2018 IEEE Applied Imagery Pattern Recognition Workshop (AIPR). :1-6.

In recent years, deep convolution neural networks (DCNNs) have won many contests in machine learning, object detection, and pattern recognition. Furthermore, deep learning techniques achieved exceptional performance in image classification, reaching accuracy levels beyond human capability. Malware variants from similar categories often contain similarities due to code reuse. Converting malware samples into images can cause these patterns to manifest as image features, which can be exploited for DCNN classification. Techniques for converting malware binaries into images for visualization and classification have been reported in the literature, and while these methods do reach a high level of classification accuracy on training datasets, they tend to be vulnerable to overfitting and perform poorly on previously unseen samples. In this paper, we explore and document a variety of techniques for representing malware binaries as images with the goal of discovering a format best suited for deep learning. We implement a database for malware binaries from several families, stored in hexadecimal format. These malware samples are converted into images using various approaches and are used to train a neural network to recognize visual patterns in the input and classify malware based on the feature vectors. Each image type is assessed using a variety of learning models, such as transfer learning with existing DCNN architectures and feature extraction for support vector machine classifier training. Each technique is evaluated in terms of classification accuracy, result consistency, and time per trial. Our preliminary results indicate that improved image representation has the potential to enable more effective classification of new malware.

Alsulami, B., Mancoridis, S..  2018.  Behavioral Malware Classification Using Convolutional Recurrent Neural Networks. 2018 13th International Conference on Malicious and Unwanted Software (MALWARE). :103-111.

Behavioral malware detection aims to improve on the performance of static signature-based techniques used by anti-virus systems, which are less effective against modern polymorphic and metamorphic malware. Behavioral malware classification aims to go beyond the detection of malware by also identifying a malware's family according to a naming scheme such as the ones used by anti-virus vendors. Behavioral malware classification techniques use run-time features, such as file system or network activities, to capture the behavioral characteristic of running processes. The increasing volume of malware samples, diversity of malware families, and the variety of naming schemes given to malware samples by anti-virus vendors present challenges to behavioral malware classifiers. We describe a behavioral classifier that uses a Convolutional Recurrent Neural Network and data from Microsoft Windows Prefetch files. We demonstrate the model's improvement on the state-of-the-art using a large dataset of malware families and four major anti-virus vendor naming schemes. The model is effective in classifying malware samples that belong to common and rare malware families and can incrementally accommodate the introduction of new malware samples and families.

Kim, H. M., Song, H. M., Seo, J. W., Kim, H. K..  2018.  Andro-Simnet: Android Malware Family Classification Using Social Network Analysis. 2018 16th Annual Conference on Privacy, Security and Trust (PST). :1-8.

While the rapid adaptation of mobile devices changes our daily life more conveniently, the threat derived from malware is also increased. There are lots of research to detect malware to protect mobile devices, but most of them adopt only signature-based malware detection method that can be easily bypassed by polymorphic and metamorphic malware. To detect malware and its variants, it is essential to adopt behavior-based detection for efficient malware classification. This paper presents a system that classifies malware by using common behavioral characteristics along with malware families. We measure the similarity between malware families with carefully chosen features commonly appeared in the same family. With the proposed similarity measure, we can classify malware by malware's attack behavior pattern and tactical characteristics. Also, we apply community detection algorithm to increase the modularity within each malware family network aggregation. To maintain high classification accuracy, we propose a process to derive the optimal weights of the selected features in the proposed similarity measure. During this process, we find out which features are significant for representing the similarity between malware samples. Finally, we provide an intuitive graph visualization of malware samples which is helpful to understand the distribution and likeness of the malware networks. In the experiment, the proposed system achieved 97% accuracy for malware classification and 95% accuracy for prediction by K-fold cross-validation using the real malware dataset.

Debatty, T., Mees, W., Gilon, T..  2018.  Graph-Based APT Detection. 2018 International Conference on Military Communications and Information Systems (ICMCIS). :1-8.

In this paper we propose a new algorithm to detect Advanced Persistent Threats (APT's) that relies on a graph model of HTTP traffic. We also implement a complete detection system with a web interface that allows to interactively analyze the data. We perform a complete parameter study and experimental evaluation using data collected on a real network. The results show that the performance of our system is comparable to currently available antiviruses, although antiviruses use signatures to detect known malwares while our algorithm solely uses behavior analysis to detect new undocumented attacks.

Xue, S., Zhang, L., Li, A., Li, X., Ruan, C., Huang, W..  2018.  AppDNA: App Behavior Profiling via Graph-Based Deep Learning. IEEE INFOCOM 2018 - IEEE Conference on Computer Communications. :1475-1483.

Better understanding of mobile applications' behaviors would lead to better malware detection/classification and better app recommendation for users. In this work, we design a framework AppDNA to automatically generate a compact representation for each app to comprehensively profile its behaviors. The behavior difference between two apps can be measured by the distance between their representations. As a result, the versatile representation can be generated once for each app, and then be used for a wide variety of objectives, including malware detection, app categorizing, plagiarism detection, etc. Based on a systematic and deep understanding of an app's behavior, we propose to perform a function-call-graph-based app profiling. We carefully design a graph-encoding method to convert a typically extremely large call-graph to a 64-dimension fix-size vector to achieve robust app profiling. Our extensive evaluations based on 86,332 benign and malicious apps demonstrate that our system performs app profiling (thus malware detection, classification, and app recommendation) to a high accuracy with extremely low computation cost: it classifies 4024 (benign/malware) apps using around 5.06 second with accuracy about 93.07%; it classifies 570 malware's family (total 21 families) using around 0.83 second with accuracy 82.3%; it classifies 9,730 apps' functionality with accuracy 33.3% for a total of 7 categories and accuracy of 88.1 % for 2 categories.

Jiang, H., Turki, T., Wang, J. T. L..  2018.  DLGraph: Malware Detection Using Deep Learning and Graph Embedding. 2018 17th IEEE International Conference on Machine Learning and Applications (ICMLA). :1029-1033.

In this paper we present a new approach, named DLGraph, for malware detection using deep learning and graph embedding. DLGraph employs two stacked denoising autoencoders (SDAs) for representation learning, taking into consideration computer programs' function-call graphs and Windows application programming interface (API) calls. Given a program, we first use a graph embedding technique that maps the program's function-call graph to a vector in a low-dimensional feature space. One SDA in our deep learning model is used to learn a latent representation of the embedded vector of the function-call graph. The other SDA in our model is used to learn a latent representation of the given program's Windows API calls. The two learned latent representations are then merged to form a combined feature vector. Finally, we use softmax regression to classify the combined feature vector for predicting whether the given program is malware or not. Experimental results based on different datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach and its superiority over a related method.

2019-05-20
Prokofiev, A. O., Smirnova, Y. S., Surov, V. A..  2018.  A method to detect Internet of Things botnets. 2018 IEEE Conference of Russian Young Researchers in Electrical and Electronic Engineering (EIConRus). :105–108.

The main security problems, typical for the Internet of Things (IoT), as well as the purpose of gaining unauthorized access to the IoT, are considered in this paper. Common characteristics of the most widespread botnets are provided. A method to detect compromised IoT devices included into a botnet is proposed. The method is based on a model of logistic regression. The article describes a developed model of logistic regression which allows to estimate the probability that a device initiating a connection is running a bot. A list of network protocols, used to gain unauthorized access to a device and to receive instructions from common and control (C&C) server, is provided too.

2019-05-09
Sokolov, A. N., Barinov, A. E., Antyasov, I. S., Skurlaev, S. V., Ufimtcev, M. S., Luzhnov, V. S..  2018.  Hardware-Based Memory Acquisition Procedure for Digital Investigations of Security Incidents in Industrial Control Systems. 2018 Global Smart Industry Conference (GloSIC). :1-7.

The safety of industrial control systems (ICS) depends not only on comprehensive solutions for protecting information, but also on the timing and closure of vulnerabilities in the software of the ICS. The investigation of security incidents in the ICS is often greatly complicated by the fact that malicious software functions only within the computer's volatile memory. Obtaining the contents of the volatile memory of an attacked computer is difficult to perform with a guaranteed reliability, since the data collection procedure must be based on a reliable code (the operating system or applications running in its environment). The paper proposes a new instrumental method for obtaining the contents of volatile memory, general rules for implementing the means of collecting information stored in memory. Unlike software methods, the proposed method has two advantages: firstly, there is no problem in terms of reading the parts of memory, blocked by the operating system, and secondly, the resulting contents are not compromised by such malicious software. The proposed method is relevant for investigating security incidents of ICS and can be used in continuous monitoring systems for the security of ICS.

2019-04-05
Bapat, R., Mandya, A., Liu, X., Abraham, B., Brown, D. E., Kang, H., Veeraraghavan, M..  2018.  Identifying Malicious Botnet Traffic Using Logistic Regression. 2018 Systems and Information Engineering Design Symposium (SIEDS). :266-271.

An important source of cyber-attacks is malware, which proliferates in different forms such as botnets. The botnet malware typically looks for vulnerable devices across the Internet, rather than targeting specific individuals, companies or industries. It attempts to infect as many connected devices as possible, using their resources for automated tasks that may cause significant economic and social harm while being hidden to the user and device. Thus, it becomes very difficult to detect such activity. A considerable amount of research has been conducted to detect and prevent botnet infestation. In this paper, we attempt to create a foundation for an anomaly-based intrusion detection system using a statistical learning method to improve network security and reduce human involvement in botnet detection. We focus on identifying the best features to detect botnet activity within network traffic using a lightweight logistic regression model. The network traffic is processed by Bro, a popular network monitoring framework which provides aggregate statistics about the packets exchanged between a source and destination over a certain time interval. These statistics serve as features to a logistic regression model responsible for classifying malicious and benign traffic. Our model is easy to implement and simple to interpret. We characterized and modeled 8 different botnet families separately and as a mixed dataset. Finally, we measured the performance of our model on multiple parameters using F1 score, accuracy and Area Under Curve (AUC).

Lysenko, S., Bobrovnikova, K., Savenko, O..  2018.  A Botnet Detection Approach Based on the Clonal Selection Algorithm. 2018 IEEE 9th International Conference on Dependable Systems, Services and Technologies (DESSERT). :424-428.
The paper presents a new technique for the botnets' detection in the corporate area networks. It is based on the usage of the algorithms of the artificial immune systems. Proposed approach is able to distinguish benign network traffic from malicious one using the clonal selection algorithm taking into account the features of the botnet's presence in the network. An approach present the main improvements of the BotGRABBER system. It is able to detect the IRC, HTTP, DNS and P2P botnets.