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2021-05-13
Sun, Zhichuang, Feng, Bo, Lu, Long, Jha, Somesh.  2020.  OAT: Attesting Operation Integrity of Embedded Devices. 2020 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP). :1433—1449.

Due to the wide adoption of IoT/CPS systems, embedded devices (IoT frontends) become increasingly connected and mission-critical, which in turn has attracted advanced attacks (e.g., control-flow hijacks and data-only attacks). Unfortunately, IoT backends (e.g., remote controllers or in-cloud services) are unable to detect if such attacks have happened while receiving data, service requests, or operation status from IoT devices (remotely deployed embedded devices). As a result, currently, IoT backends are forced to blindly trust the IoT devices that they interact with.To fill this void, we first formulate a new security property for embedded devices, called "Operation Execution Integrity" or OEI. We then design and build a system, OAT, that enables remote OEI attestation for ARM-based bare-metal embedded devices. Our formulation of OEI captures the integrity of both control flow and critical data involved in an operation execution. Therefore, satisfying OEI entails that an operation execution is free of unexpected control and data manipulations, which existing attestation methods cannot check. Our design of OAT strikes a balance between prover's constraints (embedded devices' limited computing power and storage) and verifier's requirements (complete verifiability and forensic assistance). OAT uses a new control-flow measurement scheme, which enables lightweight and space-efficient collection of measurements (97% space reduction from the trace-based approach). OAT performs the remote control-flow verification through abstract execution, which is fast and deterministic. OAT also features lightweight integrity checking for critical data (74% less instrumentation needed than previous work). Our security analysis shows that OAT allows remote verifiers or IoT backends to detect both controlflow hijacks and data-only attacks that affect the execution of operations on IoT devices. In our evaluation using real embedded programs, OAT incurs a runtime overhead of 2.7%.

Suriano, Antonio, Striccoli, Domenico, Piro, Giuseppe, Bolla, Raffele, Boggia, Gennaro.  2020.  Attestation of Trusted and Reliable Service Function Chains in the ETSI-NFV Framework. 2020 6th IEEE Conference on Network Softwarization (NetSoft). :479—486.

The new generation of digital services are natively conceived as an ordered set of Virtual Network Functions, deployed across boundaries and organizations. In this context, security threats, variable network conditions, computational and memory capabilities and software vulnerabilities may significantly weaken the whole service chain, thus making very difficult to combat the newest kinds of attacks. It is thus extremely important to conceive a flexible (and standard-compliant) framework able to attest the trustworthiness and the reliability of each single function of a Service Function Chain. At the time of this writing, and to the best of authors knowledge, the scientific literature addressed all of these problems almost separately. To bridge this gap, this paper proposes a novel methodology, properly tailored within the ETSI-NFV framework. From one side, Software-Defined Controllers continuously monitor the properties and the performance indicators taken from networking domains of each single Virtual Network Function available in the architecture. From another side, a high-level orchestrator combines, on demand, the suitable Virtual Network Functions into a Service Function Chain, based on the user requests, targeted security requirements, and measured reliability levels. The paper concludes by further explaining the functionalities of the proposed architecture through a use case.

Dave, Avani, Banerjee, Nilanjan, Patel, Chintan.  2020.  SRACARE: Secure Remote Attestation with Code Authentication and Resilience Engine. 2020 IEEE International Conference on Embedded Software and Systems (ICESS). :1—8.

Recent technological advancements have enabled proliferated use of small embedded and IoT devices for collecting, processing, and transferring the security-critical information and user data. This exponential use has acted as a catalyst in the recent growth of sophisticated attacks such as the replay, man-in-the-middle, and malicious code modification to slink, leak, tweak or exploit the security-critical information in malevolent activities. Therefore, secure communication and software state assurance (at run-time and boot-time) of the device has emerged as open security problems. Furthermore, these devices need to have an appropriate recovery mechanism to bring them back to the known-good operational state. Previous researchers have demonstrated independent methods for attack detection and safeguard. However, the majority of them lack in providing onboard system recovery and secure communication techniques. To bridge this gap, this manuscript proposes SRACARE - a framework that utilizes the custom lightweight, secure communication protocol that performs remote/local attestation, and secure boot with an onboard resilience recovery mechanism to protect the devices from the above-mentioned attacks. The prototype employs an efficient lightweight, low-power 32-bit RISC-V processor, secure communication protocol, code authentication, and resilience engine running on the Artix 7 Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) board. This work presents the performance evaluation and state-of-the-art comparison results, which shows promising resilience to attacks and demonstrate the novel protection mechanism with onboard recovery. The framework achieves these with only 8% performance overhead and a very small increase in hardware-software footprint.

Ammar, Mahmoud, Crispo, Bruno, Tsudik, Gene.  2020.  SIMPLE: A Remote Attestation Approach for Resource-constrained IoT devices. 2020 ACM/IEEE 11th International Conference on Cyber-Physical Systems (ICCPS). :247—258.

Remote Attestation (RA) is a security service that detects malware presence on remote IoT devices by verifying their software integrity by a trusted party (verifier). There are three main types of RA: software (SW)-, hardware (HW)-, and hybrid (SW/HW)-based. Hybrid techniques obtain secure RA with minimal hardware requirements imposed on the architectures of existing microcontrollers units (MCUs). In recent years, considerable attention has been devoted to hybrid techniques since prior software-based ones lack concrete security guarantees in a remote setting, while hardware-based approaches are too costly for low-end MCUs. However, one key problem is that many already deployed IoT devices neither satisfy minimal hardware requirements nor support hardware modifications, needed for hybrid RA. This paper bridges the gap between software-based and hybrid RA by proposing a novel RA scheme based on software virtualization. In particular, it proposes a new scheme, called SIMPLE, which meets the minimal hardware requirements needed for secure RA via reliable software. SIMPLE depends on a formally-verified software-based memory isolation technique, called Security MicroVisor (Sμ V). Its reliability is achieved by extending the formally-verified safety and correctness properties to cover the entire software architecture of SIMPLE. Furthermore, SIMPLE is used to construct SIMPLE+, an efficient swarm attestation scheme for static and dynamic heterogeneous IoT networks. We implement and evaluate SIMPLE and SIMPLE+ on Atmel AVR architecture, a common MCU platform.

Huo, Dongdong, Wang, Yu, Liu, Chao, Li, Mingxuan, Wang, Yazhe, Xu, Zhen.  2020.  LAPE: A Lightweight Attestation of Program Execution Scheme for Bare-Metal Systems. 2020 IEEE 22nd International Conference on High Performance Computing and Communications; IEEE 18th International Conference on Smart City; IEEE 6th International Conference on Data Science and Systems (HPCC/SmartCity/DSS). :78—86.

Unlike traditional processors, Internet of Things (IoT) devices are short of resources to incorporate mature protections (e.g. MMU, TrustZone) against modern control-flow attacks. Remote (control-flow) attestation is fast becoming a key instrument in securing such devices as it has proven the effectiveness on not only detecting runtime malware infestation of a remote device, but also saving the computing resources by moving the costly verification process away. However, few control-flow attestation schemes have been able to draw on any systematic research into the software specificity of bare-metal systems, which are widely deployed on resource-constrained IoT devices. To our knowledge, the unique design patterns of the system limit implementations of such expositions. In this paper, we present the design and proof-of-concept implementation of LAPE, a lightweight attestation of program execution scheme that enables detecting control-flow attacks for bare-metal systems without requiring hardware modification. With rudimentary memory protection support found in modern IoT-class microcontrollers, LAPE leverages software instrumentation to compartmentalize the firmware functions into several ”attestation compartments”. It then continuously tracks the control-flow events of each compartment and periodically reports them to the verifier. The PoC of the scheme is incorporated into an LLVM-based compiler to generate the LAPE-enabled firmware. By taking experiments with several real-world IoT firmware, the results show both the efficiency and practicality of LAPE.

Yu, Chen, Chen, Liquan, Lu, Tianyu.  2020.  A Direct Anonymous Attestation Scheme Based on Mimic Defense Mechanism. 2020 International Conference on Internet of Things and Intelligent Applications (ITIA). :1—5.

Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communication is a essential subset of the Internet of Things (IoT). Secure access to communication network systems by M2M devices requires the support of a secure and efficient anonymous authentication protocol. The Direct Anonymous Attestation (DAA) scheme in Trustworthy Computing is a verified security protocol. However, the existing defense system uses a static architecture. The “mimic defense” strategy is characterized by active defense, which is not effective against continuous detection and attack by the attacker. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a Mimic-DAA scheme that incorporates mimic defense to establish an active defense scheme. Multiple heterogeneous and redundant actuators are used to form a DAA verifier and optimization is scheduled so that the behavior of the DAA verifier unpredictable by analysis. The Mimic-DAA proposed in this paper is capable of forming a security mechanism for active defense. The Mimic-DAA scheme effectively safeguard the unpredictability, anonymity, security and system-wide security of M2M communication networks. In comparison with existing DAA schemes, the scheme proposed in this paper improves the safety while maintaining the computational complexity.

Sardar, Muhammad Usama, Quoc, Do Le, Fetzer, Christof.  2020.  Towards Formalization of Enhanced Privacy ID (EPID)-based Remote Attestation in Intel SGX. 2020 23rd Euromicro Conference on Digital System Design (DSD). :604—607.

Vulnerabilities in privileged software layers have been exploited with severe consequences. Recently, Trusted Execution Environments (TEEs) based technologies have emerged as a promising approach since they claim strong confidentiality and integrity guarantees regardless of the trustworthiness of the underlying system software. In this paper, we consider one of the most prominent TEE technologies, referred to as Intel Software Guard Extensions (SGX). Despite many formal approaches, there is still a lack of formal proof of some critical processes of Intel SGX, such as remote attestation. To fill this gap, we propose a fully automated, rigorous, and sound formal approach to specify and verify the Enhanced Privacy ID (EPID)-based remote attestation in Intel SGX under the assumption that there are no side-channel attacks and no vulnerabilities inside the enclave. The evaluation indicates that the confidentiality of attestation keys is preserved against a Dolev-Yao adversary in this technology. We also present a few of the many inconsistencies found in the existing literature on Intel SGX attestation during formal specification.

Jenkins, Ira Ray, Smith, Sean W..  2020.  Distributed IoT Attestation via Blockchain. 2020 20th IEEE/ACM International Symposium on Cluster, Cloud and Internet Computing (CCGRID). :798—801.

We propose a novel attestation architecture for the Internet of Things (IoT). Our distributed attestation network (DAN) utilizes blockchain technology to store and share device information. We present the design of this new attestation architecture as well as a prototype system chosen to emulate an IoT deployment with a network of Raspberry Pi, Infineon TPMs, and a Hyperledger Fabric blockchain.

Arias, Orlando, Sullivan, Dean, Shan, Haoqi, Jin, Yier.  2020.  LAHEL: Lightweight Attestation Hardening Embedded Devices using Macrocells. 2020 IEEE International Symposium on Hardware Oriented Security and Trust (HOST). :305—315.

In recent years, we have seen an advent in software attestation defenses targeting embedded systems which aim to detect tampering with a device's running program. With a persistent threat of an increasingly powerful attacker with physical access to the device, attestation approaches have become more rooted into the device's hardware with some approaches even changing the underlying microarchitecture. These drastic changes to the hardware make the proposed defenses hard to apply to new systems. In this paper, we present and evaluate LAHEL as the means to study the implementation and pitfalls of a hardware-based attestation mechanism. We limit LAHEL to utilize existing technologies without demanding any hardware changes. We implement LAHEL as a hardware IP core which interfaces with the CoreSight Debug Architecture available in modern ARM cores. We show how LAHEL can be integrated to system on chip designs allowing for microcontroller vendors to easily add our defense into their products. We present and test our prototype on a Zynq-7000 SoC, evaluating the security of LAHEL against powerful time-of-check-time-of-use (TOCTOU) attacks, while demonstrating improved performance over existing attestation schemes.

2021-05-05
Chalkiadakis, Nikolaos, Deyannis, Dimitris, Karnikis, Dimitris, Vasiliadis, Giorgos, Ioannidis, Sotiris.  2020.  The Million Dollar Handshake: Secure and Attested Communications in the Cloud. 2020 IEEE 13th International Conference on Cloud Computing (CLOUD). :63—70.

The number of applications and services that are hosted on cloud platforms is constantly increasing. Nowadays, more and more applications are hosted as services on cloud platforms, co-existing with other services in a mutually untrusted environment. Facilities such as virtual machines, containers and encrypted communication channels aim to offer isolation between the various applications and protect sensitive user data. However, such techniques are not always able to provide a secure execution environment for sensitive applications nor they offer guarantees that data are not monitored by an honest but curious provider once they reach the cloud infrastructure. The recent advancements of trusted execution environments within commodity processors, such as Intel SGX, provide a secure reverse sandbox, where code and data are isolated even from the underlying operating system. Moreover, Intel SGX provides a remote attestation mechanism, allowing the communicating parties to verify their identity as well as prove that code is executed on hardware-assisted software enclaves. Many approaches try to ensure code and data integrity, as well as enforce channel encryption schemes such as TLS, however, these techniques are not enough to achieve complete isolation and secure communications without hardware assistance or are not efficient in terms of performance. In this work, we design and implement a practical attestation system that allows the service provider to offer a seamless attestation service between the hosted applications and the end clients. Furthermore, we implement a novel caching system that is capable to eliminate the latencies introduced by the remote attestation process. Our approach allows the parties to attest one another before each communication attempt, with improved performance when compared to a standard TLS handshake.

2020-12-21
Liu, Q., Wu, W., Liu, Q., Huangy, Q..  2020.  T2DNS: A Third-Party DNS Service with Privacy Preservation and Trustworthiness. 2020 29th International Conference on Computer Communications and Networks (ICCCN). :1–11.
We design a third-party DNS service named T2DNS. T2DNS serves client DNS queries with the following features: protecting clients from channel and server attackers, providing trustworthiness proof to clients, being compatible with the existing Internet infrastructure, and introducing bounded overhead. T2DNS's privacy preservation is achieved by a hybrid protocol of encryption and obfuscation, and its service proxy is implemented on Intel SGX. We overcome the challenges of scaling the initialization process, bounding the obfuscation overhead, and tuning practical system parameters. We prototype T2DNS, and experiment results show that T2DNS is fully functional, has acceptable overhead in comparison with other solutions, and is scalable to the number of clients.
2020-09-28
Chen, Yuqi, Poskitt, Christopher M., Sun, Jun.  2018.  Learning from Mutants: Using Code Mutation to Learn and Monitor Invariants of a Cyber-Physical System. 2018 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP). :648–660.
Cyber-physical systems (CPS) consist of sensors, actuators, and controllers all communicating over a network; if any subset becomes compromised, an attacker could cause significant damage. With access to data logs and a model of the CPS, the physical effects of an attack could potentially be detected before any damage is done. Manually building a model that is accurate enough in practice, however, is extremely difficult. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for constructing models of CPS automatically, by applying supervised machine learning to data traces obtained after systematically seeding their software components with faults ("mutants"). We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach on the simulator of a real-world water purification plant, presenting a framework that automatically generates mutants, collects data traces, and learns an SVM-based model. Using cross-validation and statistical model checking, we show that the learnt model characterises an invariant physical property of the system. Furthermore, we demonstrate the usefulness of the invariant by subjecting the system to 55 network and code-modification attacks, and showing that it can detect 85% of them from the data logs generated at runtime.
2020-08-17
De Oliveira Nunes, Ivan, ElDefrawy, Karim, Rattanavipanon, Norrathep, Tsudik, Gene.  2019.  PURE: Using Verified Remote Attestation to Obtain Proofs of Update, Reset and Erasure in low-End Embedded Systems. 2019 IEEE/ACM International Conference on Computer-Aided Design (ICCAD). :1–8.
Remote Attestation ( RA) is a security service that enables a trusted verifier ( Vrf) to measure current memory state of an untrusted remote prover ( Prv). If correctly implemented, RA allows Vrf to remotely detect if Prv's memory reflects a compromised state. However, RA by itself offers no means of remedying the situation once P rv is determined to be compromised. In this work we show how a secure RA architecture can be extended to enable important and useful security services for low-end embedded devices. In particular, we extend the formally verified RA architecture, VRASED, to implement provably secure software update, erasure, and system-wide resets. When (serially) composed, these features guarantee to Vrf that a remote Prv has been updated to a functional and malware-free state, and was properly initialized after such process. These services are provably secure against an adversary (represented by malware) that compromises Prv and exerts full control of its software state. Our results demonstrate that such services incur minimal additional overhead (0.4% extra hardware footprint, and 100-s milliseconds to generate combined proofs of update, erasure, and reset), making them practical even for the lowest-end embedded devices, e.g., those based on MSP430 or AVR ATMega micro-controller units (MCUs). All changes introduced by our new services to VRASED trusted components are also formally verified.
De Oliveira Nunes, Ivan, Dessouky, Ghada, Ibrahim, Ahmad, Rattanavipanon, Norrathep, Sadeghi, Ahmad-Reza, Tsudik, Gene.  2019.  Towards Systematic Design of Collective Remote Attestation Protocols. 2019 IEEE 39th International Conference on Distributed Computing Systems (ICDCS). :1188–1198.
Networks of and embedded (IoT) devices are becoming increasingly popular, particularly, in settings such as smart homes, factories and vehicles. These networks can include numerous (potentially diverse) devices that collectively perform certain tasks. In order to guarantee overall safety and privacy, especially in the face of remote exploits, software integrity of each device must be continuously assured. This can be achieved by Remote Attestation (RA) - a security service for reporting current software state of a remote and untrusted device. While RA of a single device is well understood, collective RA of large numbers of networked embedded devices poses new research challenges. In particular, unlike single-device RA, collective RA has not benefited from any systematic treatment. Thus, unsurprisingly, prior collective RA schemes are designed in an ad hoc fashion. Our work takes the first step toward systematic design of collective RA, in order to help place collective RA onto a solid ground and serve as a set of design guidelines for both researchers and practitioners. We explore the design space for collective RA and show how the notions of security and effectiveness can be formally defined according to a given application domain. We then present and evaluate a concrete collective RA scheme systematically designed to satisfy these goals.
Härer, Felix, Fill, Hans-Georg.  2019.  Decentralized Attestation of Conceptual Models Using the Ethereum Blockchain. 2019 IEEE 21st Conference on Business Informatics (CBI). 01:104–113.
Decentralized attestation methods for blockchains are currently being discussed and standardized for use cases such as certification, identity and existence proofs. In a blockchain-based attestation, a claim made about the existence of information can be cryptographically verified publicly and transparently. In this paper we explore the attestation of models through globally unique identifiers as a first step towards decentralized applications based on models. As a proof-of-concept we describe a prototypical implementation of a software connector for the ADOxx metamodeling platform. The connector allows for (a.) the creation of claims bound to the identity of an Ethereum account and (b.) their verification on the blockchain by anyone at a later point in time. For evaluating the practical applicability, we demonstrate the application on the Ethereum network and measure and evaluate limiting factors related to transaction cost and confirmation times.
Vliegen, Jo, Rabbani, Md Masoom, Conti, Mauro, Mentens, Nele.  2019.  SACHa: Self-Attestation of Configurable Hardware. 2019 Design, Automation Test in Europe Conference Exhibition (DATE). :746–751.
Device attestation is a procedure to verify whether an embedded device is running the intended application code. This way, protection against both physical attacks and remote attacks on the embedded software is aimed for. With the wide adoption of Field-Programmable Gate Arrays or FPGAs, hardware also became configurable, and hence susceptible to attacks (just like software). In addition, an upcoming trend for hardware-based attestation is the use of configurable FPGA hardware. Therefore, in order to attest a whole system that makes use of FPGAs, the status of both the software and the hardware needs to be verified, without the availability of a tamper-resistant hardware module.In this paper, we propose a solution in which a prover core on the FPGA performs an attestation of the entire FPGA, including a self-attestation. This way, the FPGA can be used as a tamper-resistant hardware module to perform hardware-based attestation of a processor, resulting in a protection of the entire hardware/software system against malicious code updates.
Chen, Huili, Fu, Cheng, Rouhani, Bita Darvish, Zhao, Jishen, Koushanfar, Farinaz.  2019.  DeepAttest: An End-to-End Attestation Framework for Deep Neural Networks. 2019 ACM/IEEE 46th Annual International Symposium on Computer Architecture (ISCA). :487–498.
Emerging hardware architectures for Deep Neural Networks (DNNs) are being commercialized and considered as the hardware- level Intellectual Property (IP) of the device providers. However, these intelligent devices might be abused and such vulnerability has not been identified. The unregulated usage of intelligent platforms and the lack of hardware-bounded IP protection impair the commercial advantage of the device provider and prohibit reliable technology transfer. Our goal is to design a systematic methodology that provides hardware-level IP protection and usage control for DNN applications on various platforms. To address the IP concern, we present DeepAttest, the first on-device DNN attestation method that certifies the legitimacy of the DNN program mapped to the device. DeepAttest works by designing a device-specific fingerprint which is encoded in the weights of the DNN deployed on the target platform. The embedded fingerprint (FP) is later extracted with the support of the Trusted Execution Environment (TEE). The existence of the pre-defined FP is used as the attestation criterion to determine whether the queried DNN is authenticated. Our attestation framework ensures that only authorized DNN programs yield the matching FP and are allowed for inference on the target device. DeepAttest provisions the device provider with a practical solution to limit the application usage of her manufactured hardware and prevents unauthorized or tampered DNNs from execution. We take an Algorithm/Software/Hardware co-design approach to optimize DeepAttest's overhead in terms of latency and energy consumption. To facilitate the deployment, we provide a high-level API of DeepAttest that can be seamlessly integrated into existing deep learning frameworks and TEEs for hardware-level IP protection and usage control. Extensive experiments corroborate the fidelity, reliability, security, and efficiency of DeepAttest on various DNN benchmarks and TEE-supported platforms.
Conti, Mauro, Dushku, Edlira, Mancini, Luigi V..  2019.  RADIS: Remote Attestation of Distributed IoT Services. 2019 Sixth International Conference on Software Defined Systems (SDS). :25–32.
Remote attestation is a security technique through which a remote trusted party (i.e., Verifier) checks the trust-worthiness of a potentially untrusted device (i.e., Prover). In the Internet of Things (IoT) systems, the existing remote attestation protocols propose various approaches to detect the modified software and physical tampering attacks. However, in an inter-operable IoT system, in which IoT devices interact autonomously among themselves, an additional problem arises: a compromised IoT service can influence the genuine operation of other invoked service, without changing the software of the latter. In this paper, we propose a protocol for Remote Attestation of Distributed IoT Services (RADIS), which verifies the trust-worthiness of distributed IoT services. Instead of attesting the complete memory content of the entire interoperable IoT devices, RADIS attests only the services involved in performing a certain functionality. RADIS relies on a control-flow attestation technique to detect IoT services that perform an unexpected operation due to their interactions with a malicious remote service. Our experiments show the effectiveness of our protocol in validating the integrity status of a distributed IoT service.
O'Donoghue, Jeremy.  2019.  Towards lightweight and interoperable trust models: The entity attestation token. Living in the Internet of Things (IoT 2019). :1–11.
It is generally difficult for a relying party to obtain trustworthy evidence about the characteristics of the remote systems with which they interact, and such systems as exist today tend to be proprietary and/or expensive to deploy. Large-scale IoT deployments will require mechanisms enabling the state of system components to be reliably determined to enable management systems to efficiently identify certain classes of overall system vulnerability. Such attestation mechanisms will need to support heterogeneous systems comprising equipment from many vendors, often with differing cost and security profiles. The Entity Attestation Token (EAT) [1] is an extensible and crypto-agile container for transporting claims about a device state in a verifiable manner. In its simplest form, the Entity Attestation Token can be implemented at very low cost in pure hardware, but it can scale to meet the requirements of complex systems. The Entity Attestation Token is built on the IETF COSE (CBOR Object Signing and Encryption) standard. COSE provides a lightweight, flexible and crypto-agile container for a collection of standardized claims definitions — these are being defined in number of bodies including the IETF and GlobalPlatform. Of particular practical note is the strong support for Entity Attestation Token from a number of very significant vendors in the semiconductor industry. This paper outlines the technical foundations of the Entity Attestation Token as a mechanism for reliably transporting claims within an attestation framework, discusses some of the interoperability challenges and considers areas where further work may be required.
Kohnhäuser, Florian, Büscher, Niklas, Katzenbeisser, Stefan.  2019.  A Practical Attestation Protocol for Autonomous Embedded Systems. 2019 IEEE European Symposium on Security and Privacy (EuroS P). :263–278.
With the recent advent of the Internet of Things (IoT), embedded devices increasingly operate collaboratively in autonomous networks. A key technique to guard the secure and safe operation of connected embedded devices is remote attestation. It allows a third party, the verifier, to ensure the integrity of a remote device, the prover. Unfortunately, existing attestation protocols are impractical when applied in autonomous networks of embedded systems due to their limited scalability, performance, robustness, and security guarantees. In this work, we propose PASTA, a novel attestation protocol that is particularly suited for autonomous embedded systems. PASTA is the first that (i) enables many low-end prover devices to attest their integrity towards many potentially untrustworthy low-end verifier devices, (ii) is fully decentralized, thus, able to withstand network disruptions and arbitrary device outages, and (iii) is in addition to software attacks capable of detecting physical attacks in a much more robust way than any existing protocol. We implemented our protocol, conducted measurements, and simulated large networks. The results show that PASTA is practical on low-end embedded devices, scales to large networks with millions of devices, and improves robustness by multiple orders of magnitude compared with the best existing protocols.
Hu, Jianxing, Huo, Dongdong, Wang, Meilin, Wang, Yazhe, Zhang, Yan, Li, Yu.  2019.  A Probability Prediction Based Mutable Control-Flow Attestation Scheme on Embedded Platforms. 2019 18th IEEE International Conference On Trust, Security And Privacy In Computing And Communications/13th IEEE International Conference On Big Data Science And Engineering (TrustCom/BigDataSE). :530–537.
Control-flow attacks cause powerful threats to the software integrity. Remote attestation for control flow is a crucial security service for ensuring the software integrity on embedded platforms. The fine-grained remote control-flow attestation with execution-profiling Control-Flow Graph (CFG) is applied to defend against control-flow attacks. It is a safe scheme but it may influence the runtime efficiency. In fact, we find out only the vulnerable parts of a program need being attested at costly fine-grained level to ensure the security, and the remaining normal parts just need a lightweight coarse-grained check to reduce the overhead. We propose Mutable Granularity Control-Flow Attestation (MGC-FA) scheme, which bases on a probabilistic model, to distinguish between the vulnerable and normal parts in the program and combine fine-grained and coarse-grained control-flow attestation schemes. MGC-FA employs the execution-profiling CFG to apply the remote control-flow attestation scheme on embedded devices. MGC-FA is implemented on Raspberry Pi with ARM TrustZone and the experimental results show its effect on balancing the relationship between runtime efficiency and control-flow security.
2020-05-22
Desmoulins, Nicolas, Diop, Aïda, Rafflé, Yvan, Traoré, Jacques, Gratesac, Josselin.  2019.  Practical Anonymous Attestation-based Pseudonym Schemes for Vehicular Networks. 2019 IEEE Vehicular Networking Conference (VNC). :1—8.

Vehicular communication systems increase traffic efficiency and safety by allowing vehicles to share safety-related information and location-based services. Pseudonym schemes are the standard solutions providing driver/vehicle anonymity, whilst enforcing vehicle accountability in case of liability issues. State-of-the-art PKI-based pseudonym schemes present scalability issues, notably due to the centralized architecture of certificate-based solutions. The first Direct Anonymous Attestation (DAA)-based pseudonym scheme was introduced at VNC 2017, providing a decentralized approach to the pseudonym generation and update phases. The DAA-based construction leverages the properties of trusted computing, allowing vehicles to autonomously generate their own pseudonyms by using a (resource constrained) Trusted Hardware Module or Component (TC). This proposition however requires the TC to delegate part of the (heavy) pseudonym generation computations to the (more powerful) vehicle's On-Board Unit (OBU), introducing security and privacy issues in case the OBU becomes compromised. In this paper, we introduce a novel pseudonym scheme based on a variant of DAA, namely a pre-DAA-based pseudonym scheme. All secure computations in the pre-DAA pseudonym lifecycle are executed by the secure element, thus creating a secure enclave for pseudonym generation, update, and revocation. We instantiate vehicle-to-everything (V2X) with our pre-DAA solution, thus ensuring user anonymity and user-controlled traceability within the vehicular network. In addition, the pre-DAA-based construction transfers accountability from the vehicle to the user, thus complying with the many-to-many driver/vehicle relation. We demonstrate the efficiency of our solution with a prototype implementation on a standard Javacard (acting as a TC), showing that messages can be anonymously signed and verified in less than 50 ms.

2020-02-10
Koutroumpouchos, Nikos, Ntantogian, Christoforos, Menesidou, Sofia-Anna, Liang, Kaitai, Gouvas, Panagiotis, Xenakis, Christos, Giannetsos, Thanassis.  2019.  Secure Edge Computing with Lightweight Control-Flow Property-based Attestation. 2019 IEEE Conference on Network Softwarization (NetSoft). :84–92.

The Internet of Things (IoT) is rapidly evolving, while introducing several new challenges regarding security, resilience and operational assurance. In the face of an increasing attack landscape, it is necessary to cater for the provision of efficient mechanisms to collectively verify software- and device-integrity in order to detect run-time modifications. Towards this direction, remote attestation has been proposed as a promising defense mechanism. It allows a third party, the verifier, to ensure the integrity of a remote device, the prover. However, this family of solutions do not capture the real-time requirements of industrial IoT applications and suffer from scalability and efficiency issues. In this paper, we present a lightweight dynamic control-flow property-based attestation architecture (CFPA) that can be applied on both resource-constrained edge and cloud devices and services. It is a first step towards a new line of security mechanisms that enables the provision of control-flow attestation of only those specific, critical software components that are comparatively small, simple and limited in function, thus, allowing for a much more efficient verification. Our goal is to enhance run-time software integrity and trustworthiness with a scalable and decentralized solution eliminating the need for federated infrastructure trust. Based on our findings, we posit open issues and challenges, and discuss possible ways to address them, so that security do not hinder the deployment of intelligent edge computing systems.

2019-03-11
Broström, Tom, Zhu, John, Robucci, Ryan, Younis, Mohamed.  2018.  IoT Boot Integrity Measuring and Reporting. SIGBED Rev.. 15:14–21.
The current era can be characterized by the massive reliance on computing platforms in almost all domains, such as manufacturing, defense, healthcare, government. However, with the increased productivity, flexibility, and effectiveness that computers provide, comes the vulnerability to cyber-attacks where software, or even firmware, gets subtly modified by a hacker. The integration of a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) opts to tackle this issue by aiding in the detection of unauthorized modifications so that devices get remediation as needed. Nonetheless, the use of a TPM is impractical for resource-constrained devices due to power, space and cost limitations. With the recent proliferation of miniaturized devices along with the push towards the Internet-of Things (IoT) there is a need for a lightweight and practical alternative to the TPM. This paper proposes a cost-effective solution that incorporates modest amounts of integrated roots-of-trust logic and supports attestation of the integrity of the device's boot-up state. Our solution leverages crypto-acceleration modules found on many microprocessor and microcontroller based IoT devices nowadays, and introduces little additional overhead. The basic concepts have been validated through implementation on an SoC with an FPGA and a hard microcontroller. We report the validation results and highlight the involved tradeoffs.
2019-02-13
Ko, Ronny, Mickens, James.  2018.  DeadBolt: Securing IoT Deployments. Proceedings of the Applied Networking Research Workshop. :50–57.

In this paper, we introduce DeadBolt, a new security framework for managing IoT network access. DeadBolt hides all of the devices in an IoT deployment behind an access point that implements deny-by-default policies for both incoming and outgoing traffic. The DeadBolt AP also forces high-end IoT devices to use remote attestation to gain network access; attestation allows the devices to prove that they run up-to-date, trusted software. For lightweight IoT devices which lack the ability to attest, the DeadBolt AP uses virtual drivers (essentially, security-focused virtual network functions) to protect lightweight device traffic. For example, a virtual driver might provide network intrusion detection, or encrypt device traffic that is natively cleartext. Using these techniques, and several others, DeadBolt can prevent realistic attacks while imposing only modest performance costs.