Visible to the public Biblio

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2017-03-07
Iyengar, Varsha, Coleman, Grisha, Tinapple, David, Turaga, Pavan.  2016.  Motion, Captured: An Open Repository for Comparative Movement Studies. Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on Movement and Computing. :17:1–17:6.

This paper begins to describe a new kind of database, one that explores a diverse range of movement in the field of dance through capture of different bodies and different backgrounds - or what we are terming movement vernaculars. We re-purpose Ivan Illich's concept of 'vernacular work' [11] here to refer to those everyday forms of dance and organized movement that are informal, refractory (resistant to formal analysis), yet are socially reproduced and derived from a commons. The project investigates the notion of vernaculars in movement that is intentional and aesthetic through the development of a computational approach that highlights both similarities and differences, thereby revealing the specificities of each individual mover. This paper presents an example of how this movement database is used as a research tool, and how the fruits of that research can be added back to the database, thus adding a novel layer of annotation and further enriching the collection. Future researchers can then benefit from this layer, further refining and building upon these techniques. The creation of a robust, open source, movement lexicon repository will allow for observation, speculation, and contextualization - along with the provision of clean and complex data sets for new forms of creative expression.

2018-02-06
Mispan, M. S., Halak, B., Zwolinski, M..  2017.  Lightweight Obfuscation Techniques for Modeling Attacks Resistant PUFs. 2017 IEEE 2nd International Verification and Security Workshop (IVSW). :19–24.

Building lightweight security for low-cost pervasive devices is a major challenge considering the design requirements of a small footprint and low power consumption. Physical Unclonable Functions (PUFs) have emerged as a promising technology to provide a low-cost authentication for such devices. By exploiting intrinsic manufacturing process variations, PUFs are able to generate unique and apparently random chip identifiers. Strong-PUFs represent a variant of PUFs that have been suggested for lightweight authentication applications. Unfortunately, many of the Strong-PUFs have been shown to be susceptible to modelling attacks (i.e., using machine learning techniques) in which an adversary has access to challenge and response pairs. In this study, we propose an obfuscation technique during post-processing of Strong-PUF responses to increase the resilience against machine learning attacks. We conduct machine learning experiments using Support Vector Machines and Artificial Neural Networks on two Strong-PUFs: a 32-bit Arbiter-PUF and a 2-XOR 32-bit Arbiter-PUF. The predictability of the 32-bit Arbiter-PUF is reduced to $\approx$ 70% by using an obfuscation technique. Combining the obfuscation technique with 2-XOR 32-bit Arbiter-PUF helps to reduce the predictability to $\approx$ 64%. More reduction in predictability has been observed in an XOR Arbiter-PUF because this PUF architecture has a good uniformity. The area overhead with an obfuscation technique consumes only 788 and 1080 gate equivalents for the 32-bit Arbiter-PUF and 2-XOR 32-bit Arbiter-PUF, respectively.

2020-02-10
Chechik, Marsha.  2019.  Uncertain Requirements, Assurance and Machine Learning. 2019 IEEE 27th International Requirements Engineering Conference (RE). :2–3.
From financial services platforms to social networks to vehicle control, software has come to mediate many activities of daily life. Governing bodies and standards organizations have responded to this trend by creating regulations and standards to address issues such as safety, security and privacy. In this environment, the compliance of software development to standards and regulations has emerged as a key requirement. Compliance claims and arguments are often captured in assurance cases, with linked evidence of compliance. Evidence can come from testcases, verification proofs, human judgement, or a combination of these. That is, we try to build (safety-critical) systems carefully according to well justified methods and articulate these justifications in an assurance case that is ultimately judged by a human. Yet software is deeply rooted in uncertainty making pragmatic assurance more inductive than deductive: most of complex open-world functionality is either not completely specifiable (due to uncertainty) or it is not cost-effective to do so, and deductive verification cannot happen without specification. Inductive assurance, achieved by sampling or testing, is easier but generalization from finite set of examples cannot be formally justified. And of course the recent popularity of constructing software via machine learning only worsens the problem - rather than being specified by predefined requirements, machine-learned components learn existing patterns from the available training data, and make predictions for unseen data when deployed. On the surface, this ability is extremely useful for hard-to specify concepts, e.g., the definition of a pedestrian in a pedestrian detection component of a vehicle. On the other, safety assessment and assurance of such components becomes very challenging. In this talk, I focus on two specific approaches to arguing about safety and security of software under uncertainty. The first one is a framework for managing uncertainty in assurance cases (for "conventional" and "machine-learned" systems) by systematically identifying, assessing and addressing it. The second is recent work on supporting development of requirements for machine-learned components in safety-critical domains.
2020-04-20
Lecuyer, Mathias, Atlidakis, Vaggelis, Geambasu, Roxana, Hsu, Daniel, Jana, Suman.  2019.  Certified Robustness to Adversarial Examples with Differential Privacy. 2019 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP). :656–672.
Adversarial examples that fool machine learning models, particularly deep neural networks, have been a topic of intense research interest, with attacks and defenses being developed in a tight back-and-forth. Most past defenses are best effort and have been shown to be vulnerable to sophisticated attacks. Recently a set of certified defenses have been introduced, which provide guarantees of robustness to norm-bounded attacks. However these defenses either do not scale to large datasets or are limited in the types of models they can support. This paper presents the first certified defense that both scales to large networks and datasets (such as Google's Inception network for ImageNet) and applies broadly to arbitrary model types. Our defense, called PixelDP, is based on a novel connection between robustness against adversarial examples and differential privacy, a cryptographically-inspired privacy formalism, that provides a rigorous, generic, and flexible foundation for defense.
2020-09-28
Piskachev, Goran, Nguyen Quang Do, Lisa, Johnson, Oshando, Bodden, Eric.  2019.  SWAN\_ASSIST: Semi-Automated Detection of Code-Specific, Security-Relevant Methods. 2019 34th IEEE/ACM International Conference on Automated Software Engineering (ASE). :1094–1097.
To detect specific types of bugs and vulnerabilities, static analysis tools must be correctly configured with security-relevant methods (SRM), e.g., sources, sinks, sanitizers and authentication methods-usually a very labour-intensive and error-prone process. This work presents the semi-automated tool SWAN\_ASSIST, which aids the configuration with an IntelliJ plugin based on active machine learning. It integrates our novel automated machine-learning approach SWAN, which identifies and classifies Java SRM. SWAN\_ASSIST further integrates user feedback through iterative learning. SWAN\_ASSIST aids developers by asking them to classify at each point in time exactly those methods whose classification best impact the classification result. Our experiments show that SWAN\_ASSIST classifies SRM with a high precision, and requires a relatively low effort from the user. A video demo of SWAN\_ASSIST can be found at https://youtu.be/fSyD3V6EQOY. The source code is available at https://github.com/secure-software-engineering/swan.
2021-02-03
Rehan, S., Singh, R..  2020.  Industrial and Home Automation, Control, Safety and Security System using Bolt IoT Platform. 2020 International Conference on Smart Electronics and Communication (ICOSEC). :787—793.
This paper describes a system that comprises of control, safety and security subsystem for industries and homes. The entire system is based on the Bolt IoT platform. Using this system, the user can control the devices such as LEDs, speed of the fan or DC motor, monitor the temperature of the premises with an alert sub-system for critical temperatures through SMS and call, monitor the presence of anyone inside the premises with an alert sub-system about any intrusion through SMS and call. If the system is used specifically in any industry then instead of monitoring the temperature any other physical quantity, which is critical for that industry, can be monitored using suitable sensors. In addition, the cloud connectivity is provided to the system using the Bolt IoT module and temperature data is sent to the cloud where using machine-learning algorithm the future temperature is predicted to avoid any accidents in the future.