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Alavizadeh, H., Jang-Jaccard, J., Kim, D. S..  2018.  Evaluation for Combination of Shuffle and Diversity on Moving Target Defense Strategy for Cloud Computing. 2018 17th IEEE International Conference On Trust, Security And Privacy In Computing And Communications/ 12th IEEE International Conference On Big Data Science And Engineering (TrustCom/BigDataSE). :573-578.

Moving Target Defence (MTD) has been recently proposed and is an emerging proactive approach which provides an asynchronous defensive strategies. Unlike traditional security solutions that focused on removing vulnerabilities, MTD makes a system dynamic and unpredictable by continuously changing attack surface to confuse attackers. MTD can be utilized in cloud computing to address the cloud's security-related problems. There are many literature proposing MTD methods in various contexts, but it still lacks approaches to evaluate the effectiveness of proposed MTD method. In this paper, we proposed a combination of Shuffle and Diversity MTD techniques and investigate on the effects of deploying these techniques from two perspectives lying on two groups of security metrics (i) system risk: which is the cloud providers' perspective and (ii) attack cost and return on attack: which are attacker's point of view. Moreover, we utilize a scalable Graphical Security Model (GSM) to enhance the security analysis complexity. Finally, we show that combining MTD techniques can improve both aforementioned two groups of security metrics while individual technique cannot.

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Pappa, A. C., Ashok, A., Govindarasu, M..  2017.  Moving target defense for securing smart grid communications: Architecture, implementation evaluation. 2017 IEEE Power Energy Society Innovative Smart Grid Technologies Conference (ISGT). :1–5.

Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition(SCADA) communications are often subjected to various sophisticated cyber-attacks mostly because of their static system characteristics, enabling an attacker for easier profiling of the target system(s) and thereby impacting the Critical Infrastructures(CI). In this Paper, a novel approach to mitigate such static vulnerabilities is proposed by implementing a Moving Target Defense (MTD) strategy in a power grid SCADA environment, leveraging the existing communication network with an end-to-end IP-Hopping technique among trusted peers. The main contribution involves the design and implementation of MTD Architecture on Iowa State's PowerCyber testbed for targeted cyber-attacks, without compromising the availability of a SCADA system and studying the delay and throughput characteristics for different hopping rates in a realistic environment. Finally, we study two cases and provide mitigations for potential weaknesses of the proposed mechanism. Also, we propose to incorporate port mutation to further increase attack complexity as part of future work.

Lakshminarayana, Subhash, Belmega, E. Veronica, Poor, H. Vincent.  2019.  Moving-Target Defense for Detecting Coordinated Cyber-Physical Attacks in Power Grids. 2019 IEEE International Conference on Communications, Control, and Computing Technologies for Smart Grids (SmartGridComm). :1–7.
This work proposes a moving target defense (MTD) strategy to detect coordinated cyber-physical attacks (CCPAs) against power grids. A CCPA consists of a physical attack, such as disconnecting a transmission line, followed by a coordinated cyber attack that injects false data into the sensor measurements to mask the effects of the physical attack. Such attacks can lead to undetectable line outages and cause significant damage to the grid. The main idea of the proposed approach is to invalidate the knowledge that the attackers use to mask the effects of the physical attack by actively perturbing the grid's transmission line reactances using distributed flexible AC transmission system (D-FACTS) devices. We identify the MTD design criteria in this context to thwart CCPAs. The proposed MTD design consists of two parts. First, we identify the subset of links for D-FACTS device deployment that enables the defender to detect CCPAs against any link in the system. Then, in order to minimize the defense cost during the system's operational time, we use a game-theoretic approach to identify the best subset of links (within the D-FACTS deployment set) to perturb which will provide adequate protection. Extensive simulations performed using the MATPOWER simulator on IEEE bus systems verify the effectiveness of our approach in detecting CCPAs and reducing the operator's defense cost.