Visible to the public Biblio

Found 108 results

Filters: Keyword is graph theory  [Clear All Filters]
2019-10-28
Huang, Jingwei.  2018.  From Big Data to Knowledge: Issues of Provenance, Trust, and Scientific Computing Integrity. 2018 IEEE International Conference on Big Data (Big Data). :2197–2205.
This paper addresses the nature of data and knowledge, the relation between them, the variety of views as a characteristic of Big Data regarding that data may come from many different sources/views from different viewpoints, and the associated essential issues of data provenance, knowledge provenance, scientific computing integrity, and trust in the data science process. Towards the direction of data-intensive science and engineering, it is of paramount importance to ensure Scientific Computing Integrity (SCI). A failure of SCI may be caused by malicious attacks, natural environmental changes, faults of scientists, operations mistakes, faults of supporting systems, faults of processes, and errors in the data or theories on which a research relies. The complexity of scientific workflows and large provenance graphs as well as various causes for SCI failures make ensuring SCI extremely difficult. Provenance and trust play critical role in evaluating SCI. This paper reports our progress in building a model for provenance-based trust reasoning about SCI.
2019-10-02
Alkadi, A., Chi, H., Prodanoff, Z. G., Kreidl, P..  2018.  Evaluation of Two RFID Traffic Models with Potential in Anomaly Detection. SoutheastCon 2018. :1–5.

The use of Knuth's Rule and Bayesian Blocks constant piecewise models for characterization of RFID traffic has been proposed already. This study presents an evaluation of the application of those two modeling techniques for various RFID traffic patterns. The data sets used in this study consist of time series of binned RFID command counts. More specifically., we compare the shape of several empirical plots of raw data sets we obtained from experimental RIFD readings., against the constant piecewise graphs produced as an output of the two modeling algorithms. One issue limiting the applicability of modeling techniques to RFID traffic is the fact that there are a large number of various RFID applications available. We consider this phenomenon to present the main motivation for this study. The general expectation is that the RFID traffic traces from different applications would be sequences with different histogram shapes. Therefore., no modeling technique could be considered universal for modeling the traffic from multiple RFID applications., without first evaluating its model performance for various traffic patterns. We postulate that differences in traffic patterns are present if the histograms of two different sets of RFID traces form visually different plot shapes.

2019-06-10
Debatty, T., Mees, W., Gilon, T..  2018.  Graph-Based APT Detection. 2018 International Conference on Military Communications and Information Systems (ICMCIS). :1-8.

In this paper we propose a new algorithm to detect Advanced Persistent Threats (APT's) that relies on a graph model of HTTP traffic. We also implement a complete detection system with a web interface that allows to interactively analyze the data. We perform a complete parameter study and experimental evaluation using data collected on a real network. The results show that the performance of our system is comparable to currently available antiviruses, although antiviruses use signatures to detect known malwares while our algorithm solely uses behavior analysis to detect new undocumented attacks.

Xue, S., Zhang, L., Li, A., Li, X., Ruan, C., Huang, W..  2018.  AppDNA: App Behavior Profiling via Graph-Based Deep Learning. IEEE INFOCOM 2018 - IEEE Conference on Computer Communications. :1475-1483.

Better understanding of mobile applications' behaviors would lead to better malware detection/classification and better app recommendation for users. In this work, we design a framework AppDNA to automatically generate a compact representation for each app to comprehensively profile its behaviors. The behavior difference between two apps can be measured by the distance between their representations. As a result, the versatile representation can be generated once for each app, and then be used for a wide variety of objectives, including malware detection, app categorizing, plagiarism detection, etc. Based on a systematic and deep understanding of an app's behavior, we propose to perform a function-call-graph-based app profiling. We carefully design a graph-encoding method to convert a typically extremely large call-graph to a 64-dimension fix-size vector to achieve robust app profiling. Our extensive evaluations based on 86,332 benign and malicious apps demonstrate that our system performs app profiling (thus malware detection, classification, and app recommendation) to a high accuracy with extremely low computation cost: it classifies 4024 (benign/malware) apps using around 5.06 second with accuracy about 93.07%; it classifies 570 malware's family (total 21 families) using around 0.83 second with accuracy 82.3%; it classifies 9,730 apps' functionality with accuracy 33.3% for a total of 7 categories and accuracy of 88.1 % for 2 categories.

Jiang, H., Turki, T., Wang, J. T. L..  2018.  DLGraph: Malware Detection Using Deep Learning and Graph Embedding. 2018 17th IEEE International Conference on Machine Learning and Applications (ICMLA). :1029-1033.

In this paper we present a new approach, named DLGraph, for malware detection using deep learning and graph embedding. DLGraph employs two stacked denoising autoencoders (SDAs) for representation learning, taking into consideration computer programs' function-call graphs and Windows application programming interface (API) calls. Given a program, we first use a graph embedding technique that maps the program's function-call graph to a vector in a low-dimensional feature space. One SDA in our deep learning model is used to learn a latent representation of the embedded vector of the function-call graph. The other SDA in our model is used to learn a latent representation of the given program's Windows API calls. The two learned latent representations are then merged to form a combined feature vector. Finally, we use softmax regression to classify the combined feature vector for predicting whether the given program is malware or not. Experimental results based on different datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach and its superiority over a related method.

Jain, D., Khemani, S., Prasad, G..  2018.  Identification of Distributed Malware. 2018 IEEE 3rd International Conference on Communication and Information Systems (ICCIS). :242-246.

Smartphones have evolved over the years from simple devices to communicate with each other to fully functional portable computers although with comparatively less computational power but inholding multiple applications within. With the smartphone revolution, the value of personal data has increased. As technological complexities increase, so do the vulnerabilities in the system. Smartphones are the latest target for attacks. Android being an open source platform and also the most widely used smartphone OS draws the attention of many malware writers to exploit the vulnerabilities of it. Attackers try to take advantage of these vulnerabilities and fool the user and misuse their data. Malwares have come a long way from simple worms to sophisticated DDOS using Botnets, the latest trends in computer malware tend to go in the distributed direction, to evade the multiple anti-virus apps developed to counter generic viruses and Trojans. However, the recent trend in android system is to have a combination of applications which acts as malware. The applications are benign individually but when grouped, these may result into a malicious activity. This paper proposes a new category of distributed malware in android system, how it can be used to evade the current security, and how it can be detected with the help of graph matching algorithm.

Luo, Chen, Chen, Zhengzhang, Tang, Lu-An, Shrivastava, Anshumali, Li, Zhichun, Chen, Haifeng, Ye, Jieping.  2018.  TINET: Learning Invariant Networks via Knowledge Transfer. Proceedings of the 24th ACM SIGKDD International Conference on Knowledge Discovery & Data Mining. :1890-1899.

The latent behavior of an information system that can exhibit extreme events, such as system faults or cyber-attacks, is complex. Recently, the invariant network has shown to be a powerful way of characterizing complex system behaviors. Structures and evolutions of the invariance network, in particular, the vanishing correlations, can shed light on identifying causal anomalies and performing system diagnosis. However, due to the dynamic and complex nature of real-world information systems, learning a reliable invariant network in a new environment often requires continuous collecting and analyzing the system surveillance data for several weeks or even months. Although the invariant networks learned from old environments have some common entities and entity relationships, these networks cannot be directly borrowed for the new environment due to the domain variety problem. To avoid the prohibitive time and resource consuming network building process, we propose TINET, a knowledge transfer based model for accelerating invariant network construction. In particular, we first propose an entity estimation model to estimate the probability of each source domain entity that can be included in the final invariant network of the target domain. Then, we propose a dependency construction model for constructing the unbiased dependency relationships by solving a two-constraint optimization problem. Extensive experiments on both synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of TINET. We also apply TINET to a real enterprise security system for intrusion detection. TINET achieves superior detection performance at least 20 days lead-lag time in advance with more than 75% accuracy.

Cao, Cheng, Chen, Zhengzhang, Caverlee, James, Tang, Lu-An, Luo, Chen, Li, Zhichun.  2018.  Behavior-Based Community Detection: Application to Host Assessment In Enterprise Information Networks. Proceedings of the 27th ACM International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management. :1977-1985.

Community detection in complex networks is a fundamental problem that attracts much attention across various disciplines. Previous studies have been mostly focusing on external connections between nodes (i.e., topology structure) in the network whereas largely ignoring internal intricacies (i.e., local behavior) of each node. A pair of nodes without any interaction can still share similar internal behaviors. For example, in an enterprise information network, compromised computers controlled by the same intruder often demonstrate similar abnormal behaviors even if they do not connect with each other. In this paper, we study the problem of community detection in enterprise information networks, where large-scale internal events and external events coexist on each host. The discovered host communities, capturing behavioral affinity, can benefit many comparative analysis tasks such as host anomaly assessment. In particular, we propose a novel community detection framework to identify behavior-based host communities in enterprise information networks, purely based on large-scale heterogeneous event data. We continue proposing an efficient method for assessing host's anomaly level by leveraging the detected host communities. Experimental results on enterprise networks demonstrate the effectiveness of our model.

Su, Fang-Hsiang, Bell, Jonathan, Kaiser, Gail, Ray, Baishakhi.  2018.  Obfuscation Resilient Search Through Executable Classification. Proceedings of the 2Nd ACM SIGPLAN International Workshop on Machine Learning and Programming Languages. :20-30.

Android applications are usually obfuscated before release, making it difficult to analyze them for malware presence or intellectual property violations. Obfuscators might hide the true intent of code by renaming variables and/or modifying program structures. It is challenging to search for executables relevant to an obfuscated application for developers to analyze efficiently. Prior approaches toward obfuscation resilient search have relied on certain structural parts of apps remaining as landmarks, un-touched by obfuscation. For instance, some prior approaches have assumed that the structural relationships between identifiers are not broken by obfuscators; others have assumed that control flow graphs maintain their structures. Both approaches can be easily defeated by a motivated obfuscator. We present a new approach, MACNETO, to search for programs relevant to obfuscated executables leveraging deep learning and principal components on instructions. MACNETO makes few assumptions about the kinds of modifications that an obfuscator might perform. We show that it has high search precision for executables obfuscated by a state-of-the-art obfuscator that changes control flow. Further, we also demonstrate the potential of MACNETO to help developers understand executables, where MACNETO infers keywords (which are from relevant un-obfuscated programs) for obfuscated executables.

Jo, Saehan, Yoo, Jaemin, Kang, U.  2018.  Fast and Scalable Distributed Loopy Belief Propagation on Real-World Graphs. Proceedings of the Eleventh ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining. :297-305.

Given graphs with millions or billions of vertices and edges, how can we efficiently make inferences based on partial knowledge? Loopy Belief Propagation(LBP) is a graph inference algorithm widely used in various applications including social network analysis, malware detection, recommendation, and image restoration. The algorithm calculates approximate marginal probabilities of vertices in a graph within a linear running time proportional to the number of edges. However, when it comes to real-world graphs with millions or billions of vertices and edges, this cost overwhelms the computing power of a single machine. Moreover, this kind of large-scale graphs does not fit into the memory of a single machine. Although several distributed LBP methods have been proposed, previous works do not consider the properties of real-world graphs, especially the effect of power-law degree distribution on LBP. Therefore, our work focuses on developing a fast and scalable LBP for such large real-world graphs on distributed environment. In this paper, we propose DLBP, a Distributed Loopy Belief Propagation algorithm which efficiently computes LBP in a distributed manner across multiple machines. By setting the correct convergence criterion and carefully scheduling the computations, DLBP provides up to 10.7x speed up compared to standard distributed LBP. We show that DLBP demonstrates near-linear scalability with respect to the number of machines as well as the number of edges.

Mpanti, Anna, Nikolopoulos, Stavros D., Polenakis, Iosif.  2018.  A Graph-Based Model for Malicious Software Detection Exploiting Domination Relations Between System-Call Groups. Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Computer Systems and Technologies. :20-26.

In this paper, we propose a graph-based algorithmic technique for malware detection, utilizing the System-call Dependency Graphs (ScDG) obtained through taint analysis traces. We leverage the grouping of system-calls into system-call groups with respect to their functionality to merge disjoint vertices of ScDG graphs, transforming them to Group Relation Graphs (GrG); note that, the GrG graphs represent malware's behavior being hence more resilient to probable mutations of its structure. More precisely, we extend the use of GrG graphs by mapping their vertices on the plane utilizing the degrees and the vertex-weights of a specific underlying graph of the GrG graph as to compute domination relations. Furthermore, we investigate how the activity of each system-call group could be utilized in order to distinguish graph-representations of malware and benign software. The domination relations among the vertices of GrG graphs result to a new graph representation that we call Coverage Graph of the GrG graph. Finally, we evaluate the potentials of our detection model using graph similarity between Coverage Graphs of known malicious and benign software samples of various types.

Karbab, ElMouatez Billah, Debbabi, Mourad.  2018.  ToGather: Automatic Investigation of Android Malware Cyber-Infrastructures. Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Availability, Reliability and Security. :20:1-20:10.

The popularity of Android, not only in handsets but also in IoT devices, makes it a very attractive target for malware threats, which are actually expanding at a significant rate. The state-of-the-art in malware mitigation solutions mainly focuses on the detection of malicious Android apps using dynamic and static analysis features to segregate malicious apps from benign ones. Nevertheless, there is a small coverage for the Internet/network dimension of Android malicious apps. In this paper, we present ToGather, an automatic investigation framework that takes Android malware samples as input and produces insights about the underlying malicious cyber infrastructures. ToGather leverages state-of-the-art graph theory techniques to generate actionable, relevant and granular intelligence to mitigate the threat effects induced by the malicious Internet activity of Android malware apps. We evaluate ToGather on a large dataset of real malware samples from various Android families, and the obtained results are both interesting and promising.

Rmayti, M., Begriche, Y., Khatoun, R., Khoukhi, L., Mammeri, A..  2018.  Graph-based wormhole attack detection in mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs). 2018 Fourth International Conference on Mobile and Secure Services (MobiSecServ). :1–6.

A Mobile ad hoc network (MANET) is a set of nodes that communicate together in a cooperative way using the wireless medium, and without any central administration. Due to its inherent open nature and the lack of infrastructure, security is a complicated issue compared to other networks. That is, these networks are vulnerable to a a wide range of attacks at different network layers. At the network level, malicious nodes can perform several attacks ranging from passive eavesdropping to active interfering. Wormhole is an example of severe attack that has attracted much attention recently. It involves the redirection of traffic between two end-nodes through a Wormhole tunnel, and manipulates the routing algorithm to give illusion that nodes located far from each other are neighbors. To handle with this issue, we propose a novel detection model to allow a node to check whether a presumed shortest path contains a Wormhole tunnel or not. Our approach is based on the fact that the Wormhole tunnel reduces significantly the length of the paths passing through it.

2019-05-01
Enoch, S. Yusuf, Hong, J. B., Kim, D. S..  2018.  Time Independent Security Analysis for Dynamic Networks Using Graphical Security Models. 2018 17th IEEE International Conference On Trust, Security And Privacy In Computing And Communications/ 12th IEEE International Conference On Big Data Science And Engineering (TrustCom/BigDataSE). :588–595.

It is technically challenging to conduct a security analysis of a dynamic network, due to the lack of methods and techniques to capture different security postures as the network changes. Graphical Security Models (e.g., Attack Graph) are used to assess the security of network systems, but it typically captures a snapshot of a network state to carry out the security analysis. To address this issue, we propose a new Graphical Security Model named Time-independent Hierarchical Attack Representation Model (Ti-HARM) that captures security of multiple network states by taking into account the time duration of each network state and the visibility of network components (e.g., hosts, edges) in each state. By incorporating the changes, we can analyse the security of dynamic networks taking into account all the threats appearing in different network states. Our experimental results show that the Ti-HARM can effectively capture and assess the security of dynamic networks which were not possible using existing graphical security models.

Vagin, V. V., Butakova, N. G..  2019.  Mathematical Modeling of Group Authentication Based on Isogeny of Elliptic Curves. 2019 IEEE Conference of Russian Young Researchers in Electrical and Electronic Engineering (EIConRus). :1780–1785.

In this paper, we consider ways of organizing group authentication, as well as the features of constructing the isogeny of elliptic curves. The work includes the study of isogeny graphs and their application in postquantum systems. A hierarchical group authentication scheme has been developed using transformations based on the search for isogeny of elliptic curves.

2019-03-04
[Anonymous].  2018.  A Systems Approach to Indicators of Compromise Utilizing Graph Theory. 2018 IEEE International Symposium on Technologies for Homeland Security (HST). :1–6.
It is common to record indicators of compromise (IoC) in order to describe a particular breach and to attempt to attribute a breach to a specific threat actor. However, many network security breaches actually involve multiple diverse modalities using a variety of attack vectors. Measuring and recording IoC's in isolation does not provide an accurate view of the actual incident, and thus does not facilitate attribution. A system's approach that describes the entire intrusion as an IoC would be more effective. Graph theory has been utilized to model complex systems of varying types and this provides a mathematical tool for modeling systems indicators of compromise. This current paper describes the applications of graph theory to creating systems-based indicators of compromise. A complete methodology is presented for developing systems IoC's that fully describe a complex network intrusion.
Zhu, Z., Jiang, R., Jia, Y., Xu, J., Li, A..  2018.  Cyber Security Knowledge Graph Based Cyber Attack Attribution Framework for Space-ground Integration Information Network. 2018 IEEE 18th International Conference on Communication Technology (ICCT). :870–874.
Comparing with the traditional Internet, the space-ground integration information network has more complicated topology, wider coverage area and is more difficult to find the source of attacks. In this paper, a cyber attack attribution framework is proposed to trace the attack source in space-ground integration information network. First, we constructs a cyber security knowledge graph for space-ground integration information network. An automated attributing framework for cyber-attack is proposed. It attributes the source of the attack by querying the cyber security knowledge graph we constructed. Experiments show that the proposed framework can attribute network attacks simply, effectively, and automatically.
2019-02-18
Zhang, X., Xie, H., Lui, J. C. S..  2018.  Sybil Detection in Social-Activity Networks: Modeling, Algorithms and Evaluations. 2018 IEEE 26th International Conference on Network Protocols (ICNP). :44–54.

Detecting fake accounts (sybils) in online social networks (OSNs) is vital to protect OSN operators and their users from various malicious activities. Typical graph-based sybil detection (a mainstream methodology) assumes that sybils can make friends with only a limited (or small) number of honest users. However, recent evidences showed that this assumption does not hold in real-world OSNs, leading to low detection accuracy. To address this challenge, we explore users' activities to assist sybil detection. The intuition is that honest users are much more selective in choosing who to interact with than to befriend with. We first develop the social and activity network (SAN), a two-layer hyper-graph that unifies users' friendships and their activities, to fully utilize users' activities. We also propose a more practical sybil attack model, where sybils can launch both friendship attacks and activity attacks. We then design Sybil SAN to detect sybils via coupling three random walk-based algorithms on the SAN, and prove the convergence of Sybil SAN. We develop an efficient iterative algorithm to compute the detection metric for Sybil SAN, and derive the number of rounds needed to guarantee the convergence. We use "matrix perturbation theory" to bound the detection error when sybils launch many friendship attacks and activity attacks. Extensive experiments on both synthetic and real-world datasets show that Sybil SAN is highly robust against sybil attacks, and can detect sybils accurately under practical scenarios, where current state-of-art sybil defenses have low accuracy.

Wang, G., Wang, B., Wang, T., Nika, A., Zheng, H., Zhao, B. Y..  2018.  Ghost Riders: Sybil Attacks on Crowdsourced Mobile Mapping Services. IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking. 26:1123–1136.
Real-time crowdsourced maps, such as Waze provide timely updates on traffic, congestion, accidents, and points of interest. In this paper, we demonstrate how lack of strong location authentication allows creation of software-based Sybil devices that expose crowdsourced map systems to a variety of security and privacy attacks. Our experiments show that a single Sybil device with limited resources can cause havoc on Waze, reporting false congestion and accidents and automatically rerouting user traffic. More importantly, we describe techniques to generate Sybil devices at scale, creating armies of virtual vehicles capable of remotely tracking precise movements for large user populations while avoiding detection. To defend against Sybil devices, we propose a new approach based on co-location edges, authenticated records that attest to the one-time physical co-location of a pair of devices. Over time, co-location edges combine to form large proximity graphs that attest to physical interactions between devices, allowing scalable detection of virtual vehicles. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach using large-scale simulations, and how they can be used to dramatically reduce the impact of the attacks. We have informed Waze/Google team of our research findings. Currently, we are in active collaboration with Waze team to improve the security and privacy of their system.
2019-02-14
Sun, A., Gao, G., Ji, T., Tu, X..  2018.  One Quantifiable Security Evaluation Model for Cloud Computing Platform. 2018 Sixth International Conference on Advanced Cloud and Big Data (CBD). :197-201.
Whatever one public cloud, private cloud or a mixed cloud, the users lack of effective security quantifiable evaluation methods to grasp the security situation of its own information infrastructure on the whole. This paper provides a quantifiable security evaluation system for different clouds that can be accessed by consistent API. The evaluation system includes security scanning engine, security recovery engine, security quantifiable evaluation model, visual display module and etc. The security evaluation model composes of a set of evaluation elements corresponding different fields, such as computing, storage, network, maintenance, application security and etc. Each element is assigned a three tuple on vulnerabilities, score and repair method. The system adopts ``One vote vetoed'' mechanism for one field to count its score and adds up the summary as the total score, and to create one security view. We implement the quantifiable evaluation for different cloud users based on our G-Cloud platform. It shows the dynamic security scanning score for one or multiple clouds with visual graphs and guided users to modify configuration, improve operation and repair vulnerabilities, so as to improve the security of their cloud resources.
2019-02-08
Xie, H., Lv, K., Hu, C..  2018.  An Improved Monte Carlo Graph Search Algorithm for Optimal Attack Path Analysis. 2018 17th IEEE International Conference On Trust, Security And Privacy In Computing And Communications/ 12th IEEE International Conference On Big Data Science And Engineering (TrustCom/BigDataSE). :307-315.

The problem of optimal attack path analysis is one of the hotspots in network security. Many methods are available to calculate an optimal attack path, such as Q-learning algorithm, heuristic algorithms, etc. But most of them have shortcomings. Some methods can lead to the problem of path loss, and some methods render the result un-comprehensive. This article proposes an improved Monte Carlo Graph Search algorithm (IMCGS) to calculate optimal attack paths in target network. IMCGS can avoid the problem of path loss and get comprehensive results quickly. IMCGS is divided into two steps: selection and backpropagation, which is used to calculate optimal attack paths. A weight vector containing priority, host connection number, CVSS value is proposed for every host in an attack path. This vector is used to calculate the evaluation value, the total CVSS value and the average CVSS value of a path in the target network. Result for a sample test network is presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed algorithm to generate optimal attack paths in one single run. The results obtained by IMCGS show good performance and are compared with Ant Colony Optimization Algorithm (ACO) and k-zero attack graph.

Bernardi, S., Trillo-Lado, R., Merseguer, J..  2018.  Detection of Integrity Attacks to Smart Grids Using Process Mining and Time-Evolving Graphs. 2018 14th European Dependable Computing Conference (EDCC). :136-139.
In this paper, we present a work-in-progress approach to detect integrity attacks to Smart Grids by analyzing the readings from smart meters. Our approach is based on process mining and time-evolving graphs. In particular, process mining is used to discover graphs, from the dataset collecting the readings over a time period, that represent the behaviour of a customer. The time-evolving graphs are then compared in order to detect anomalous behavior of a customer. To evaluate the feasibility of our approach, we have conducted preliminary experiments by using the dataset provided by the Ireland's Commission for Energy Regulation (CER).
Nichols, W., Hawrylak, P. J., Hale, J., Papa, M..  2018.  Methodology to Estimate Attack Graph System State from a Simulation of a Nuclear Research Reactor. 2018 Resilience Week (RWS). :84-87.
Hybrid attack graphs are a powerful tool when analyzing the cybersecurity of a cyber-physical system. However, it is important to ensure that this tool correctly models reality, particularly when modelling safety-critical applications, such as a nuclear reactor. By automatically verifying that a simulation reaches the state predicted by an attack graph by analyzing the final state of the simulation, this verification procedure can be accomplished. As such, a mechanism to estimate if a simulation reaches the expected state in a hybrid attack graph is proposed here for the nuclear reactor domain.
Zou, Z., Wang, D., Yang, H., Hou, Y., Yang, Y., Xu, W..  2018.  Research on Risk Assessment Technology of Industrial Control System Based on Attack Graph. 2018 IEEE 3rd Advanced Information Technology, Electronic and Automation Control Conference (IAEAC). :2420-2423.

In order to evaluate the network security risks and implement effective defenses in industrial control system, a risk assessment method for industrial control systems based on attack graphs is proposed. Use the concept of network security elements to translate network attacks into network state migration problems and build an industrial control network attack graph model. In view of the current subjective evaluation of expert experience, the atomic attack probability assignment method and the CVSS evaluation system were introduced to evaluate the security status of the industrial control system. Finally, taking the centralized control system of the thermal power plant as the experimental background, the case analysis is performed. The experimental results show that the method can comprehensively analyze the potential safety hazards in the industrial control system and provide basis for the safety management personnel to take effective defense measures.

Yi, F., Cai, H. Y., Xin, F. Z..  2018.  A Logic-Based Attack Graph for Analyzing Network Security Risk Against Potential Attack. 2018 IEEE International Conference on Networking, Architecture and Storage (NAS). :1-4.
In this paper, we present LAPA, a framework for automatically analyzing network security risk and generating attack graph for potential attack. The key novelty in our work is that we represent the properties of networks and zero day vulnerabilities, and use logical reasoning algorithm to generate potential attack path to determine if the attacker can exploit these vulnerabilities. In order to demonstrate the efficacy, we have implemented the LAPA framework and compared with three previous network vulnerability analysis methods. Our analysis results have a low rate of false negatives and less cost of processing time due to the worst case assumption and logical property specification and reasoning. We have also conducted a detailed study of the efficiency for generation attack graph with different value of attack path number, attack path depth and network size, which affect the processing time mostly. We estimate that LAPA can produce high quality results for a large portion of networks.