Visible to the public Biblio

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2020-03-31
Nathan Malkin, Primal Wijesekera, Serge Egelman, David Wagner.  2018.  Use Case: Passively Listening Personal Assistants. Symposium on Applications of Contextual Integrity. :26-27.
Wijesekera, Primal.  2018.  Contextual permission models for better privacy protection. Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs) 2008+.

Despite corporate cyber intrusions attracting all the attention, privacy breaches that we, as ordinary users, should be worried about occur every day without any scrutiny. Smartphones, a household item, have inadvertently become a major enabler of privacy breaches. Smartphone platforms use permission systems to regulate access to sensitive resources. These permission systems, however, lack the ability to understand users’ privacy expectations leaving a significant gap between how permission models behave and how users would want the platform to protect their sensitive data. This dissertation provides an in-depth analysis of how users make privacy decisions in the context of Smartphones and how platforms can accommodate user’s privacy requirements systematically. We first performed a 36-person field study to quantify how often applications access protected resources when users are not expecting it. We found that when the application requesting the permission is running invisibly to the user, they are more likely to deny applications access to protected resources. At least 80% of our participants would have preferred to prevent at least one permission request. To explore the feasibility of predicting user’s privacy decisions based on their past decisions, we performed a longitudinal 131-person field study. Based on the data, we built a classifier to make privacy decisions on the user’s behalf by detecting when the context has changed and inferring privacy preferences based on the user’s past decisions. We showed that our approach can accurately predict users’ privacy decisions 96.8% of the time, which is an 80% reduction in error rate compared to current systems. Based on these findings, we developed a custom Android version with a contextually aware permission model. The new model guards resources based on user’s past decisions under similar contextual circumstances. We performed a 38-person field study to measure the efficiency and usability of the new permission model. Based on exit interviews and 5M data points, we found that the new system is effective in reducing the potential violations by 75%. Despite being significantly more restrictive over the default permission systems, participants did not find the new model to cause any usability issues in terms of application functionality.

Reyes, Irwin, Wijesekera, Primal, Reardon, Joel, Elazari, Amit, Razaghpanah, Abbas, Vallina-Rodriguez, Narseo, Egelman, Serge.  2018.  “Won’t Somebody Think of the Children?” Examining COPPA Compliance at Scale Proceedings on Privacy Enhancing Technologies. 2018:63-83.

We present a scalable dynamic analysis framework that allows for the automatic evaluation of the privacy behaviors of Android apps. We use our system to analyze mobile apps’ compliance with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), one of the few stringent privacy laws in the U.S. Based on our automated analysis of 5,855 of the most popular free children’s apps, we found that a majority are potentially in violation of COPPA, mainly due to their use of thirdparty SDKs. While many of these SDKs offer configuration options to respect COPPA by disabling tracking and behavioral advertising, our data suggest that a majority of apps either do not make use of these options or incorrectly propagate them across mediation SDKs. Worse, we observed that 19% of children’s apps collect identifiers or other personally identifiable information (PII) via SDKs whose terms of service outright prohibit their use in child-directed apps. Finally, we show that efforts by Google to limit tracking through the use of a resettable advertising ID have had little success: of the 3,454 apps that share the resettable ID with advertisers, 66% transmit other, non-resettable, persistent identifiers as well, negating any intended privacy-preserving properties of the advertising ID.

2020-02-05
Nathan Malkin, Serge Egelman, David Wagner.  2019.  Privacy Controls for Always-Listening Devices. New Security Paradigms Workshop (NSPW).

Intelligent voice assistants (IVAs) and other voice-enabled devices already form an integral component of the Internet of Things and will continue to grow in popularity. As their capabilities evolve, they will move beyond relying on the wake-words today’s IVAs use, engaging instead in continuous listening. Though potentially useful, the continuous recording and analysis of speech can pose a serious threat to individuals’ privacy. Ideally, users would be able to limit or control the types of information such devices have access to. But existing technical approaches are insufficient for enforcing any such restrictions. To begin formulating a solution, we develop a system- atic methodology for studying continuous-listening applications and survey architectural approaches to designing a system that enhances privacy while preserving the benefits of always-listening assistants.

2019-10-10
Alisa Frik, Leysan Nurgalieva, Julia Bernd, Joyce Lee, Florian Schaub, Serge Egelman.  2019.  Privacy and Security Threat Models and Mitigation Strategies of Older Adults. Fifteenth Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS 2019).

Older adults (65+) are becoming primary users of emerging smart systems, especially in health care. However, these technologies are often not designed for older users and can pose serious privacy and security concerns due to their novelty, complexity, and propensity to collect and communicate vast amounts of sensitive information. Efforts to address such concerns must build on an in-depth understanding of older adults' perceptions and preferences about data privacy and security for these technologies, and accounting for variance in physical and cognitive abilities. In semi-structured interviews with 46 older adults, we identified a range of complex privacy and security attitudes and needs specific to this population, along with common threat models, misconceptions, and mitigation strategies. Our work adds depth to current models of how older adults' limited technical knowledge, experience, and age-related declines in ability amplify vulnerability to certain risks; we found that health, living situation, and finances play a notable role as well. We also found that older adults often experience usability issues or technical uncertainties in mitigating those risks -- and that managing privacy and security concerns frequently consists of limiting or avoiding technology use. We recommend educational approaches and usable technical protections that build on seniors' preferences.