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2020-04-03
Zhao, Hui, Li, Zhihui, Wei, Hansheng, Shi, Jianqi, Huang, Yanhong.  2019.  SeqFuzzer: An Industrial Protocol Fuzzing Framework from a Deep Learning Perspective. 2019 12th IEEE Conference on Software Testing, Validation and Verification (ICST). :59—67.
Industrial networks are the cornerstone of modern industrial control systems. Performing security checks of industrial communication processes helps detect unknown risks and vulnerabilities. Fuzz testing is a widely used method for performing security checks that takes advantage of automation. However, there is a big challenge to carry out security checks on industrial network due to the increasing variety and complexity of industrial communication protocols. In this case, existing approaches usually take a long time to model the protocol for generating test cases, which is labor-intensive and time-consuming. This becomes even worse when the target protocol is stateful. To help in addressing this problem, we employed a deep learning model to learn the structures of protocol frames and deal with the temporal features of stateful protocols. We propose a fuzzing framework named SeqFuzzer which automatically learns the protocol frame structures from communication traffic and generates fake but plausible messages as test cases. For proving the usability of our approach, we applied SeqFuzzer to widely-used Ethernet for Control Automation Technology (EtherCAT) devices and successfully detected several security vulnerabilities.
Lipp, Benjamin, Blanchet, Bruno, Bhargavan, Karthikeyan.  2019.  A Mechanised Cryptographic Proof of the WireGuard Virtual Private Network Protocol. 2019 IEEE European Symposium on Security and Privacy (EuroS P). :231—246.
WireGuard is a free and open source Virtual Private Network (VPN) that aims to replace IPsec and OpenVPN. It is based on a new cryptographic protocol derived from the Noise Protocol Framework. This paper presents the first mechanised cryptographic proof of the protocol underlying WireGuard, using the CryptoVerif proof assistant. We analyse the entire WireGuard protocol as it is, including transport data messages, in an ACCE-style model. We contribute proofs for correctness, message secrecy, forward secrecy, mutual authentication, session uniqueness, and resistance against key compromise impersonation, identity mis-binding, and replay attacks. We also discuss the strength of the identity hiding provided by WireGuard. Our work also provides novel theoretical contributions that are reusable beyond WireGuard. First, we extend CryptoVerif to account for the absence of public key validation in popular Diffie-Hellman groups like Curve25519, which is used in many modern protocols including WireGuard. To our knowledge, this is the first mechanised cryptographic proof for any protocol employing such a precise model. Second, we prove several indifferentiability lemmas that are useful to simplify the proofs for sequences of key derivations.
Aires Urquiza, Abraão, AlTurki, Musab A., Kanovich, Max, Ban Kirigin, Tajana, Nigam, Vivek, Scedrov, Andre, Talcott, Carolyn.  2019.  Resource-Bounded Intruders in Denial of Service Attacks. 2019 IEEE 32nd Computer Security Foundations Symposium (CSF). :382—38214.
Denial of Service (DoS) attacks have been a serious security concern, as no service is, in principle, protected against them. Although a Dolev-Yao intruder with unlimited resources can trivially render any service unavailable, DoS attacks do not necessarily have to be carried out by such (extremely) powerful intruders. It is useful in practice and more challenging for formal protocol verification to determine whether a service is vulnerable even to resource-bounded intruders that cannot generate or intercept arbitrary large volumes of traffic. This paper proposes a novel, more refined intruder model where the intruder can only consume at most some specified amount of resources in any given time window. Additionally, we propose protocol theories that may contain timeouts and specify service resource usage during protocol execution. In contrast to the existing resource-conscious protocol verification models, our model allows finer and more subtle analysis of DoS problems. We illustrate the power of our approach by representing a number of classes of DoS attacks, such as, Slow, Asymmetric and Amplification DoS attacks, exhausting different types of resources of the target, such as, number of workers, processing power, memory, and network bandwidth. We show that the proposed DoS problem is undecidable in general and is PSPACE-complete for the class of resource-bounded, balanced systems. Finally, we implemented our formal verification model in the rewriting logic tool Maude and analyzed a number of DoS attacks in Maude using Rewriting Modulo SMT in an automated fashion.
Nandi, Giann Spilere, Pereira, David, Vigil, Martín, Moraes, Ricardo, Morales, Analúcia Schiaffino, Araújo, Gustavo.  2019.  Security in Wireless Sensor Networks: A formal verification of protocols. 2019 IEEE 17th International Conference on Industrial Informatics (INDIN). 1:425—431.
The increase of the digitalization taking place in various industrial domains is leading developers towards the design and implementation of more and more complex networked control systems (NCS) supported by Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN). This naturally raises new challenges for the current WSN technology, namely in what concerns improved guarantees of technical aspects such as real-time communications together with safe and secure transmissions. Notably, in what concerns security aspects, several cryptographic protocols have been proposed. Since the design of these protocols is usually error-prone, security breaches can still be exposed and MALICIOUSly exploited unless they are rigorously analyzed and verified. In this paper we formally verify, using ProVerif, three cryptographic protocols used in WSN, regarding the security properties of secrecy and authenticity. The security analysis performed in this paper is more robust than the ones performed in related work. Our contributions involve analyzing protocols that were modeled considering an unbounded number of participants and actions, and also the use of a hierarchical system to classify the authenticity results. Our verification shows that the three analyzed protocols guarantee secrecy, but can only provide authenticity in specific scenarios.
Fattahi, Jaouhar, Mejri, Mohamed, Pricop, Emil.  2019.  On the Security of Cryptographic Protocols Using the Little Theorem of Witness Functions. 2019 IEEE Canadian Conference of Electrical and Computer Engineering (CCECE). :1—5.
In this paper, we show how practical the little theorem of witness functions is in detecting security flaws in some categories of cryptographic protocols. We convey a formal analysis of the Needham-Schroeder symmetric-key protocol in the theory of witness functions. We show how it helps to warn about a security vulnerability in a given step of this protocol where the value of security of a sensitive ticket in a sent message unexpectedly decreases compared with its value when received. This vulnerability may be exploited by an intruder to mount a replay attack as described by Denning and Sacco.
Künnemann, Robert, Esiyok, Ilkan, Backes, Michael.  2019.  Automated Verification of Accountability in Security Protocols. 2019 IEEE 32nd Computer Security Foundations Symposium (CSF). :397—39716.
Accountability is a recent paradigm in security protocol design which aims to eliminate traditional trust assumptions on parties and hold them accountable for their misbehavior. It is meant to establish trust in the first place and to recognize and react if this trust is violated. In this work, we discuss a protocol-agnostic definition of accountability: a protocol provides accountability (w.r.t. some security property) if it can identify all misbehaving parties, where misbehavior is defined as a deviation from the protocol that causes a security violation. We provide a mechanized method for the verification of accountability and demonstrate its use for verification and attack finding on various examples from the accountability and causality literature, including Certificate Transparency and Krollˆ\textbackslashtextbackslashprimes Accountable Algorithms protocol. We reach a high degree of automation by expressing accountability in terms of a set of trace properties and show their soundness and completeness.
2020-03-30
Heigl, Michael, Schramm, Martin, Fiala, Dalibor.  2019.  A Lightweight Quantum-Safe Security Concept for Wireless Sensor Network Communication. 2019 IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications Workshops (PerCom Workshops). :906–911.
The ubiquitous internetworking of devices in all areas of life is boosted by various trends for instance the Internet of Things. Promising technologies that can be used for such future environments come from Wireless Sensor Networks. It ensures connectivity between distributed, tiny and simple sensor nodes as well as sensor nodes and base stations in order to monitor physical or environmental conditions such as vibrations, temperature or motion. Security plays an increasingly important role in the coming decades in which attacking strategies are becoming more and more sophisticated. Contemporary cryptographic mechanisms face a great threat from quantum computers in the near future and together with Intrusion Detection Systems are hardly applicable on sensors due to strict resource constraints. Thus, in this work a future-proof lightweight and resource-aware security concept for sensor networks with a processing stage permeated filtering mechanism is proposed. A special focus in the concepts evaluation lies on the novel Magic Number filter to mitigate a special kind of Denial-of-Service attack performed on CC1350 LaunchPad ARM Cortex-M3 microcontroller boards.
Vasiliu, Yevhen, Limar, Igor, Gancarczyk, Tomasz, Karpinski, Mikolaj.  2019.  New Quantum Secret Sharing Protocol Using Entangled Qutrits. 2019 10th IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Data Acquisition and Advanced Computing Systems: Technology and Applications (IDAACS). 1:324–329.
A new quantum secret sharing protocol based on the ping-pong protocol of quantum secure direct communication is proposed. The pairs of entangled qutrits are used in protocol, which allows an increase in the information capacity compared with protocols based on entangled qubits. The detection of channel eavesdropping used in the protocol is being implemented in random moments of time, thereby it is possible do not use the significant amount of quantum memory. The security of the proposed protocol to attacks is considered. A method for additional amplification of the security to an eavesdropping attack in communication channels for the developed protocol is proposed.
Hu, Zhengbing, Vasiliu, Yevhen, Smirnov, Oleksii, Sydorenko, Viktoriia, Polishchuk, Yuliia.  2019.  Abstract Model of Eavesdropper and Overview on Attacks in Quantum Cryptography Systems. 2019 10th IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Data Acquisition and Advanced Computing Systems: Technology and Applications (IDAACS). 1:399–405.
In today's world, it's almost impossible to find a sphere of human life in which information technologies would not be used. On the one hand, it simplifies human life - virtually everyone carries a mini-computer in his pocket and it allows to perform many operations, that took a lot of time, in minutes. In addition, IT has simplified and promptly developed areas such as medicine, banking, document circulation, military, and many other infrastructures of the state. Nevertheless, even today, privacy remains a major problem in many information transactions. One of the most important directions for ensuring the information confidentiality in open communication networks has been and remains its protection by cryptographic methods. Although it is known that traditional cryptography methods give reasons to doubt in their reliability, quantum cryptography has proven itself as a more reliable information security technology. As far is it quite new direction there is no sufficiently complete classification of attacks on quantum cryptography methods, in view of this new extended classification of attacks on quantum protocols and quantum cryptosystems is proposed in this work. Classification takes into account the newest attacks (which use devices loopholes) on quantum key distribution equipment. These attacks have been named \textbackslashtextless; \textbackslashtextless; quantum hacking\textbackslashtextgreater\textbackslashtextgreater. Such classification may be useful for choosing commercially available quantum key distribution system. Also abstract model of eavesdropper in quantum systems was created and it allows to determine a set of various nature measures that need to be further implemented to provide reliable security with the help of specific quantum systems.
Brito, J. P., López, D. R., Aguado, A., Abellán, C., López, V., Pastor-Perales, A., la Iglesia, F. de, Martín, V..  2019.  Quantum Services Architecture in Softwarized Infrastructures. 2019 21st International Conference on Transparent Optical Networks (ICTON). :1–4.
Quantum computing is posing new threats on our security infrastructure. This has triggered a new research field on quantum-safe methods, and those that rely on the application of quantum principles are commonly referred as quantum cryptography. The most mature development in the field of quantum cryptography is called Quantum Key Distribution (QKD). QKD is a key exchange primitive that can replace existing mechanisms that can become obsolete in the near future. Although QKD has reached a high level of maturity, there is still a long path for a mass market implementation. QKD shall overcome issues such as miniaturization, network integration and the reduction of production costs to make the technology affordable. In this direction, we foresee that QKD systems will evolve following the same path as other networking technologies, where systems will run on specific network cards, integrable in commodity chassis. This work describes part of our activity in the EU H2020 project CiViQ in which quantum technologies, as QKD systems or quantum random number generators (QRNG), will become a single network element that we define as Quantum Switch. This allows for quantum resources (keys or random numbers) to be provided as a service, while the different components are integrated to cooperate for providing the most random and secure bit streams. Furthermore, with the purpose of making our proposal closer to current networking technology, this work also proposes an abstraction logic for making our Quantum Switch suitable to become part of software-defined networking (SDN) architectures. The model fits in the architecture of the SDN quantum node architecture, that is being under standardization by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute. It permits to operate an entire quantum network using a logically centralized SDN controller, and quantum switches to generate and to forward key material and random numbers across the entire network. This scheme, demonstrated for the first time at the Madrid Quantum Network, will allow for a faster and seamless integration of quantum technologies in the telecommunications infrastructure.
Dreher, Patrick, Ramasami, Madhuvanti.  2019.  Prototype Container-Based Platform for Extreme Quantum Computing Algorithm Development. 2019 IEEE High Performance Extreme Computing Conference (HPEC). :1–7.
Recent advances in the development of the first generation of quantum computing devices have provided researchers with computational platforms to explore new ideas and reformulate conventional computational codes suitable for a quantum computer. Developers can now implement these reformulations on both quantum simulators and hardware platforms through a cloud computing software environment. For example, the IBM Q Experience provides the direct access to their quantum simulators and quantum computing hardware platforms. However these current access options may not be an optimal environment for developers needing to download and modify the source codes and libraries. This paper focuses on the construction of a Docker container environment with Qiskit source codes and libraries running on a local cloud computing system that can directly access the IBM Q Experience. This prototype container based system allows single user and small project groups to do rapid prototype development, testing and implementation of extreme capability algorithms with more agility and flexibility than can be provided through the IBM Q Experience website. This prototype environment also provides an excellent teaching environment for labs and project assignments within graduate courses in cloud computing and quantum computing. The paper also discusses computer security challenges for expanding this prototype container system to larger groups of quantum computing researchers.
Diamanti, Eleni.  2019.  Demonstrating Quantum Advantage in Security and Efficiency with Practical Photonic Systems. 2019 21st International Conference on Transparent Optical Networks (ICTON). :1–2.
We discuss the current landscape in quantum communication and cryptography, and focus in particular on recent photonic implementations, using encoding in discrete or continuous properties of light, of central quantum network protocols, enabling secret key distribution, verification of entangled resources and transactions of quantum money, with maximal security guarantees. We also describe current challenges in this field and our efforts towards the miniaturization of the developed photonic systems, their integration into telecommunication network infrastructures, including with satellite links, as well as the practical demonstration of novel protocols featuring a quantum advantage in communication efficiency for a wide range of useful tasks in a network environment. These advances enrich the resources and applications of the emerging quantum networks that will play a central role in the context of future quantum-safe communications.
Bharati, Aparna, Moreira, Daniel, Brogan, Joel, Hale, Patricia, Bowyer, Kevin, Flynn, Patrick, Rocha, Anderson, Scheirer, Walter.  2019.  Beyond Pixels: Image Provenance Analysis Leveraging Metadata. 2019 IEEE Winter Conference on Applications of Computer Vision (WACV). :1692–1702.
Creative works, whether paintings or memes, follow unique journeys that result in their final form. Understanding these journeys, a process known as "provenance analysis," provides rich insights into the use, motivation, and authenticity underlying any given work. The application of this type of study to the expanse of unregulated content on the Internet is what we consider in this paper. Provenance analysis provides a snapshot of the chronology and validity of content as it is uploaded, re-uploaded, and modified over time. Although still in its infancy, automated provenance analysis for online multimedia is already being applied to different types of content. Most current works seek to build provenance graphs based on the shared content between images or videos. This can be a computationally expensive task, especially when considering the vast influx of content that the Internet sees every day. Utilizing non-content-based information, such as timestamps, geotags, and camera IDs can help provide important insights into the path a particular image or video has traveled during its time on the Internet without large computational overhead. This paper tests the scope and applicability of metadata-based inferences for provenance graph construction in two different scenarios: digital image forensics and cultural analytics.
Scherzinger, Stefanie, Seifert, Christin, Wiese, Lena.  2019.  The Best of Both Worlds: Challenges in Linking Provenance and Explainability in Distributed Machine Learning. 2019 IEEE 39th International Conference on Distributed Computing Systems (ICDCS). :1620–1629.
Machine learning experts prefer to think of their input as a single, homogeneous, and consistent data set. However, when analyzing large volumes of data, the entire data set may not be manageable on a single server, but must be stored on a distributed file system instead. Moreover, with the pressing demand to deliver explainable models, the experts may no longer focus on the machine learning algorithms in isolation, but must take into account the distributed nature of the data stored, as well as the impact of any data pre-processing steps upstream in their data analysis pipeline. In this paper, we make the point that even basic transformations during data preparation can impact the model learned, and that this is exacerbated in a distributed setting. We then sketch our vision of end-to-end explainability of the model learned, taking the pre-processing into account. In particular, we point out the potentials of linking the contributions of research on data provenance with the efforts on explainability in machine learning. In doing so, we highlight pitfalls we may experience in a distributed system on the way to generating more holistic explanations for our machine learning models.
Thida, Aye, Shwe, Thanda.  2020.  Process Provenance-based Trust Management in Collaborative Fog Environment. 2020 IEEE Conference on Computer Applications(ICCA). :1–5.
With the increasing popularity and adoption of IoT technology, fog computing has been used as an advancement to cloud computing. Although trust management issues in cloud have been addressed, there are still very few studies in a fog area. Trust is needed for collaborating among fog nodes and trust can further improve the reliability by assisting in selecting the fog nodes to collaborate. To address this issue, we present a provenance based trust mechanism that traces the behavior of the process among fog nodes. Our approach adopts the completion rate and failure rate as the process provenance in trust scores of computing workload, especially obvious measures of trustworthiness. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system can effectively be used for collaboration in a fog environment.
Souza, Renan, Azevedo, Leonardo, Lourenço, Vítor, Soares, Elton, Thiago, Raphael, Brandão, Rafael, Civitarese, Daniel, Brazil, Emilio, Moreno, Marcio, Valduriez, Patrick et al..  2019.  Provenance Data in the Machine Learning Lifecycle in Computational Science and Engineering. 2019 IEEE/ACM Workflows in Support of Large-Scale Science (WORKS). :1–10.
Machine Learning (ML) has become essential in several industries. In Computational Science and Engineering (CSE), the complexity of the ML lifecycle comes from the large variety of data, scientists' expertise, tools, and workflows. If data are not tracked properly during the lifecycle, it becomes unfeasible to recreate a ML model from scratch or to explain to stackholders how it was created. The main limitation of provenance tracking solutions is that they cannot cope with provenance capture and integration of domain and ML data processed in the multiple workflows in the lifecycle, while keeping the provenance capture overhead low. To handle this problem, in this paper we contribute with a detailed characterization of provenance data in the ML lifecycle in CSE; a new provenance data representation, called PROV-ML, built on top of W3C PROV and ML Schema; and extensions to a system that tracks provenance from multiple workflows to address the characteristics of ML and CSE, and to allow for provenance queries with a standard vocabulary. We show a practical use in a real case in the O&G industry, along with its evaluation using 239,616 CUDA cores in parallel.
Miao, Hui, Deshpande, Amol.  2019.  Understanding Data Science Lifecycle Provenance via Graph Segmentation and Summarization. 2019 IEEE 35th International Conference on Data Engineering (ICDE). :1710–1713.
Increasingly modern data science platforms today have non-intrusive and extensible provenance ingestion mechanisms to collect rich provenance and context information, handle modifications to the same file using distinguishable versions, and use graph data models (e.g., property graphs) and query languages (e.g., Cypher) to represent and manipulate the stored provenance/context information. Due to the schema-later nature of the metadata, multiple versions of the same files, and unfamiliar artifacts introduced by team members, the resulting "provenance graphs" are quite verbose and evolving; further, it is very difficult for the users to compose queries and utilize this valuable information just using standard graph query model. In this paper, we propose two high-level graph query operators to address the verboseness and evolving nature of such provenance graphs. First, we introduce a graph segmentation operator, which queries the retrospective provenance between a set of source vertices and a set of destination vertices via flexible boundary criteria to help users get insight about the derivation relationships among those vertices. We show the semantics of such a query in terms of a context-free grammar, and develop efficient algorithms that run orders of magnitude faster than state-of-the-art. Second, we propose a graph summarization operator that combines similar segments together to query prospective provenance of the underlying project. The operator allows tuning the summary by ignoring vertex details and characterizing local structures, and ensures the provenance meaning using path constraints. We show the optimal summary problem is PSPACE-complete and develop effective approximation algorithms. We implement the operators on top of Neo4j, evaluate our query techniques extensively, and show the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed methods.
Jentzsch, Sophie F., Hochgeschwender, Nico.  2019.  Don't Forget Your Roots! Using Provenance Data for Transparent and Explainable Development of Machine Learning Models. 2019 34th IEEE/ACM International Conference on Automated Software Engineering Workshop (ASEW). :37–40.
Explaining reasoning and behaviour of artificial intelligent systems to human users becomes increasingly urgent, especially in the field of machine learning. Many recent contributions approach this issue with post-hoc methods, meaning they consider the final system and its outcomes, while the roots of included artefacts are widely neglected. However, we argue in this position paper that there needs to be a stronger focus on the development process. Without insights into specific design decisions and meta information that accrue during the development an accurate explanation of the resulting model is hardly possible. To remedy this situation we propose to increase process transparency by applying provenance methods, which serves also as a basis for increased explainability.
Narendra, Nanjangud C., Shukla, Anshu, Nayak, Sambit, Jagadish, Asha, Kalkur, Rachana.  2019.  Genoma: Distributed Provenance as a Service for IoT-based Systems. 2019 IEEE 5th World Forum on Internet of Things (WF-IoT). :755–760.
One of the key aspects of IoT-based systems, which we believe has not been getting the attention it deserves, is provenance. Provenance refers to those actions that record the usage of data in the system, along with the rationale for said usage. Historically, most provenance methods in distributed systems have been tightly coupled with those of the underlying data processing frameworks in such systems. However, in this paper, we argue that IoT provenance requires a different treatment, given the heterogeneity and dynamism of IoT-based systems. In particular, provenance in IoT-based systems should be decoupled as far as possible from the underlying data processing substrates in IoT-based systems.To that end, in this paper, we present Genoma, our ongoing work on a system for provenance-as-a-service in IoT-based systems. By "provenance-as-a-service" we mean the following: distributed provenance across IoT devices, edge and cloud; and agnostic of the underlying data processing substrate. Genoma comprises a set of services that act together to provide useful provenance information to users across the system. We also show how we are realizing Genoma via an implementation prototype built on Apache Atlas and Tinkergraph, through which we are investigating several key research issues in distributed IoT provenance.
Kim, Sejin, Oh, Jisun, Kim, Yoonhee.  2019.  Data Provenance for Experiment Management of Scientific Applications on GPU. 2019 20th Asia-Pacific Network Operations and Management Symposium (APNOMS). :1–4.
Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are getting popularly utilized for multi-purpose applications in order to enhance highly performed parallelism of computation. As memory virtualization methods in GPU nodes are not efficiently provided to deal with diverse memory usage patterns for these applications, the success of their execution depends on exclusive and limited use of physical memory in GPU environments. Therefore, it is important to predict a pattern change of GPU memory usage during runtime execution of an application. Data provenance extracted from application characteristics, GPU runtime environments, input, and execution patterns from runtime monitoring, is defined for supporting application management to set runtime configuration and predict an experimental result, and utilize resource with co-located applications. In this paper, we define data provenance of an application on GPUs and manage data by profiling the execution of CUDA scientific applications. Data provenance management helps to predict execution patterns of other similar experiments and plan efficient resource configuration.
Tabassum, Anika, Nady, Anannya Islam, Rezwanul Huq, Mohammad.  2019.  Mathematical Formulation and Implementation of Query Inversion Techniques in RDBMS for Tracking Data Provenance. 2019 7th International Conference on Information and Communication Technology (ICoICT). :1–6.
Nowadays the massive amount of data is produced from different sources and lots of applications are processing these data to discover insights. Sometimes we may get unexpected results from these applications and it is not feasible to trace back to the data origin manually to find the source of errors. To avoid this problem, data must be accompanied by the context of how they are processed and analyzed. Especially, data-intensive applications like e-Science always require transparency and therefore, we need to understand how data has been processed and transformed. In this paper, we propose mathematical formulation and implementation of query inversion techniques to trace the provenance of data in a relational database management system (RDBMS). We build mathematical formulations of inverse queries for most of the relational algebra operations and show the formula for join operations in this paper. We, then, implement these formulas of inversion techniques and the experiment shows that our proposed inverse queries can successfully trace back to original data i.e. finding data provenance.
2020-03-27
Al-Rushdan, Huthifh, Shurman, Mohammad, Alnabelsi, Sharhabeel H., Althebyan, Qutaibah.  2019.  Zero-Day Attack Detection and Prevention in Software-Defined Networks. 2019 International Arab Conference on Information Technology (ACIT). :278–282.
The zero-day attack in networks exploits an undiscovered vulnerability, in order to affect/damage networks or programs. The term “zero-day” refers to the number of days available to the software or the hardware vendor to issue a patch for this new vulnerability. Currently, the best-known defense mechanism against the zero-day attacks focuses on detection and response, as a prevention effort, which typically fails against unknown or new vulnerabilities. To the best of our knowledge, this attack has not been widely investigated for Software-Defined Networks (SDNs). Therefore, in this work we are motivated to develop anew zero-day attack detection and prevention mechanism, which is designed and implemented for SDN using a modified sandbox tool, named Cuckoo. Our experiments results, under UNIX system, show that our proposed design successfully stops zero-day malwares by isolating the infected client, and thus, prevents these malwares from infesting other clients.
Walker, Aaron, Amjad, Muhammad Faisal, Sengupta, Shamik.  2019.  Cuckoo’s Malware Threat Scoring and Classification: Friend or Foe? 2019 IEEE 9th Annual Computing and Communication Workshop and Conference (CCWC). :0678–0684.
Malware threat classification involves understanding the behavior of the malicious software and how it affects a victim host system. Classifying threats allows for measured response appropriate to the risk involved. Malware incident response depends on many automated tools for the classification of threat to help identify the appropriate reaction to a threat alert. Cuckoo Sandbox is one such tool which can be used for automated analysis of malware and one method of threat classification provided is a threat score. A security analyst might submit a suspicious file to Cuckoo for analysis to determine whether or not the file contains malware or performs potentially malicious behavior on a system. Cuckoo is capable of producing a report of this behavior and ranks the severity of the observed actions as a score from one to ten, with ten being the most severe. As such, a malware sample classified as an 8 would likely take priority over a sample classified as a 3. Unfortunately, this scoring classification can be misleading due to the underlying methodology of severity classification. In this paper we demonstrate why the current methodology of threat scoring is flawed and therefore we believe it can be improved with greater emphasis on analyzing the behavior of the malware. This allows for a threat classification rating which scales with the risk involved in the malware behavior.
Tamura, Keiichi, Omagari, Akitada, Hashida, Shuichi.  2019.  Novel Defense Method against Audio Adversarial Example for Speech-to-Text Transcription Neural Networks. 2019 IEEE 11th International Workshop on Computational Intelligence and Applications (IWCIA). :115–120.
With the developments in deep learning, the security of neural networks against vulnerabilities has become one of the most urgent research topics in deep learning. There are many types of security countermeasures. Adversarial examples and their defense methods, in particular, have been well-studied in recent years. An adversarial example is designed to make neural networks misclassify or produce inaccurate output. Audio adversarial examples are a type of adversarial example where the main target of attack is a speech-to-text transcription neural network. In this study, we propose a new defense method against audio adversarial examples for the speech-to-text transcription neural networks. It is difficult to determine whether an input waveform data representing the sound of voice is an audio adversarial example. Therefore, the main framework of the proposed defense method is based on a sandbox approach. To evaluate the proposed defense method, we used actual audio adversarial examples that were created on Deep Speech, which is a speech-to-text transcription neural network. We confirmed that our defense method can identify audio adversarial examples to protect speech-to-text systems.