Visible to the public Biblio

Filters: Author is Hu, Y. C.  [Clear All Filters]
2017-12-20
Liu, Z., Liu, Y., Winter, P., Mittal, P., Hu, Y. C..  2017.  TorPolice: Towards enforcing service-defined access policies for anonymous communication in the Tor network. 2017 IEEE 25th International Conference on Network Protocols (ICNP). :1–10.
Tor is the most widely used anonymity network, currently serving millions of users each day. However, there is no access control in place for all these users, leaving the network vulnerable to botnet abuse and attacks. For example, criminals frequently use exit relays as stepping stones for attacks, causing service providers to serve CAPTCHAs to exit relay IP addresses or blacklisting them altogether, which leads to severe usability issues for legitimate Tor users. To address this problem, we propose TorPolice, the first privacy-preserving access control framework for Tor. TorPolice enables abuse-plagued service providers such as Yelp to enforce access rules to police and throttle malicious requests coming from Tor while still providing service to legitimate Tor users. Further, TorPolice equips Tor with global access control for relays, enhancing Tor's resilience to botnet abuse. We show that TorPolice preserves the privacy of Tor users, implement a prototype of TorPolice, and perform extensive evaluations to validate our design goals.
2018-06-11
Chen, C. W., Chang, S. Y., Hu, Y. C., Chen, Y. W..  2017.  Protecting vehicular networks privacy in the presence of a single adversarial authority. 2017 IEEE Conference on Communications and Network Security (CNS). :1–9.

In vehicular networks, each message is signed by the generating node to ensure accountability for the contents of that message. For privacy reasons, each vehicle uses a collection of certificates, which for accountability reasons are linked at a central authority. One such design is the Security Credential Management System (SCMS) [1], which is the leading credential management system in the US. The SCMS is composed of multiple components, each of which has a different task for key management, which are logically separated. The SCMS is designed to ensure privacy against a single insider compromise, or against outside adversaries. In this paper, we demonstrate that the current SCMS design fails to achieve its design goal, showing that a compromised authority can gain substantial information about certificate linkages. We propose a solution that accommodates threshold-based detection, but uses relabeling and noise to limit the information that can be learned from a single insider adversary. We also analyze our solution using techniques from differential privacy and validate it using traffic-simulator based experiments. Our results show that our proposed solution prevents privacy information leakage against the compromised authority in collusion with outsider attackers.