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Eskandarian, Saba, Cogan, Jonathan, Birnbaum, Sawyer, Brandon, Peh Chang Wei, Franke, Dillon, Fraser, Forest, Garcia, Gaspar, Gong, Eric, Nguyen, Hung T., Sethi, Taresh K. et al..  2019.  Fidelius: Protecting User Secrets from Compromised Browsers. 2019 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP). :264—280.
Users regularly enter sensitive data, such as passwords, credit card numbers, or tax information, into the browser window. While modern browsers provide powerful client-side privacy measures to protect this data, none of these defenses prevent a browser compromised by malware from stealing it. In this work, we present Fidelius, a new architecture that uses trusted hardware enclaves integrated into the browser to enable protection of user secrets during web browsing sessions, even if the entire underlying browser and OS are fully controlled by a malicious attacker. Fidelius solves many challenges involved in providing protection for browsers in a fully malicious environment, offering support for integrity and privacy for form data, JavaScript execution, XMLHttpRequests, and protected web storage, while minimizing the TCB. Moreover, interactions between the enclave and the browser, the keyboard, and the display all require new protocols, each with their own security considerations. Finally, Fidelius takes into account UI considerations to ensure a consistent and simple interface for both developers and users. As part of this project, we develop the first open source system that provides a trusted path from input and output peripherals to a hardware enclave with no reliance on additional hypervisor security assumptions. These components may be of independent interest and useful to future projects. We implement and evaluate Fidelius to measure its performance overhead, finding that Fidelius imposes acceptable overhead on page load and user interaction for secured pages and has no impact on pages and page components that do not use its enhanced security features.
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Kogan, Dmitry, Manohar, Nathan, Boneh, Dan.  2017.  T/Key: Second-Factor Authentication From Secure Hash Chains. Proceedings of the 2017 ACM SIGSAC Conference on Computer and Communications Security. :983–999.

Time-based one-time password (TOTP) systems in use today require storing secrets on both the client and the server. As a result, an attack on the server can expose all second factors for all users in the system. We present T/Key, a time-based one-time password system that requires no secrets on the server. Our work modernizes the classic S/Key system and addresses the challenges in making such a system secure and practical. At the heart of our construction is a new lower bound analyzing the hardness of inverting hash chains composed of independent random functions, which formalizes the security of this widely used primitive. Additionally, we develop a near-optimal algorithm for quickly generating the required elements in a hash chain with little memory on the client. We report on our implementation of T/Key as an Android application. T/Key can be used as a replacement for current TOTP systems, and it remains secure in the event of a server-side compromise. The cost, as with S/Key, is that one-time passwords are longer than the standard six characters used in TOTP.

Dauterman, Emma, Corrigan-Gibbs, Henry, Mazières, David, Boneh, Dan, Rizzo, Dominic.  2019.  True2F: Backdoor-Resistant Authentication Tokens. 2019 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP). :398–416.
We present True2F, a system for second-factor authentication that provides the benefits of conventional authentication tokens in the face of phishing and software compromise, while also providing strong protection against token faults and backdoors. To do so, we develop new lightweight two-party protocols for generating cryptographic keys and ECDSA signatures, and we implement new privacy defenses to prevent cross-origin token-fingerprinting attacks. To facilitate real-world deployment, our system is backwards-compatible with today's U2F-enabled web services and runs on commodity hardware tokens after a firmware modification. A True2F-protected authentication takes just 57ms to complete on the token, compared with 23ms for unprotected U2F.
Wilson, Judson, Wahby, Riad S., Corrigan-Gibbs, Henry, Boneh, Dan, Levis, Philip, Winstein, Keith.  2017.  Trust but Verify: Auditing the Secure Internet of Things. Proceedings of the 15th Annual International Conference on Mobile Systems, Applications, and Services. :464–474.

Internet-of-Things devices often collect and transmit sensitive information like camera footage, health monitoring data, or whether someone is home. These devices protect data in transit with end-to-end encryption, typically using TLS connections between devices and associated cloud services. But these TLS connections also prevent device owners from observing what their own devices are saying about them. Unlike in traditional Internet applications, where the end user controls one end of a connection (e.g., their web browser) and can observe its communication, Internet-of-Things vendors typically control the software in both the device and the cloud. As a result, owners have no way to audit the behavior of their own devices, leaving them little choice but to hope that these devices are transmitting only what they should. This paper presents TLS–Rotate and Release (TLS-RaR), a system that allows device owners (e.g., consumers, security researchers, and consumer watchdogs) to authorize devices, called auditors, to decrypt and verify recent TLS traffic without compromising future traffic. Unlike prior work, TLS-RaR requires no changes to TLS's wire format or cipher suites, and it allows the device's owner to conduct a surprise inspection of recent traffic, without prior notice to the device that its communications will be audited.