Visible to the public Biblio

Filters: Author is Fang, D.  [Clear All Filters]
2017
Zhang, J., Tang, Z., Li, R., Chen, X., Gong, X., Fang, D., Wang, Z..  2017.  Protect Sensitive Information against Channel State Information Based Attacks. 2017 IEEE International Conference on Computational Science and Engineering (CSE) and IEEE International Conference on Embedded and Ubiquitous Computing (EUC). 2:203–210.

Channel state information (CSI) has been recently shown to be useful in performing security attacks in public WiFi environments. By analyzing how CSI is affected by the finger motions, CSI-based attacks can effectively reconstruct text-based passwords and locking patterns. This paper presents WiGuard, a novel system to protect sensitive on-screen gestures in a public place. Our approach carefully exploits the WiFi channel interference to introduce noise into the attacker's CSI measurement to reduce the success rate of the attack. Our approach automatically detects when a CSI-based attack happens. We evaluate our approach by applying it to protect text-based passwords and pattern locks on mobile devices. Experimental results show that our approach is able to reduce the success rate of CSI attacks from 92% to 42% for text-based passwords and from 82% to 22% for pattern lock.

2020
Hayes, J. Huffman, Payne, J., Essex, E., Cole, K., Alverson, J., Dekhtyar, A., Fang, D., Bernosky, G..  2020.  Towards Improved Network Security Requirements and Policy: Domain-Specific Completeness Analysis via Topic Modeling. 2020 IEEE Seventh International Workshop on Artificial Intelligence for Requirements Engineering (AIRE). :83—86.

Network security policies contain requirements - including system and software features as well as expected and desired actions of human actors. In this paper, we present a framework for evaluation of textual network security policies as requirements documents to identify areas for improvement. Specifically, our framework concentrates on completeness. We use topic modeling coupled with expert evaluation to learn the complete list of important topics that should be addressed in a network security policy. Using these topics as a checklist, we evaluate (students) a collection of network security policies for completeness, i.e., the level of presence of these topics in the text. We developed three methods for topic recognition to identify missing or poorly addressed topics. We examine network security policies and report the results of our analysis: preliminary success of our approach.