Visible to the public Biblio

Filters: Author is Shokri, Reza  [Clear All Filters]
2017-04-24
Shokri, Reza, Theodorakopoulos, George, Troncoso, Carmela.  2016.  Privacy Games Along Location Traces: A Game-Theoretic Framework for Optimizing Location Privacy. ACM Trans. Priv. Secur.. 19:11:1–11:31.

The mainstream approach to protecting the privacy of mobile users in location-based services (LBSs) is to alter (e.g., perturb, hide, and so on) the users’ actual locations in order to reduce exposed sensitive information. In order to be effective, a location-privacy preserving mechanism must consider both the privacy and utility requirements of each user, as well as the user’s overall exposed locations (which contribute to the adversary’s background knowledge). In this article, we propose a methodology that enables the design of optimal user-centric location obfuscation mechanisms respecting each individual user’s service quality requirements, while maximizing the expected error that the optimal adversary incurs in reconstructing the user’s actual trace. A key advantage of a user-centric mechanism is that it does not depend on third-party proxies or anonymizers; thus, it can be directly integrated in the mobile devices that users employ to access LBSs. Our methodology is based on the mutual optimization of user/adversary objectives (maximizing location privacy versus minimizing localization error) formalized as a Stackelberg Bayesian game. This formalization makes our solution robust against any location inference attack, that is, the adversary cannot decrease the user’s privacy by designing a better inference algorithm as long as the obfuscation mechanism is designed according to our privacy games. We develop two linear programs that solve the location privacy game and output the optimal obfuscation strategy and its corresponding optimal inference attack. These linear programs are used to design location privacy–preserving mechanisms that consider the correlation between past, current, and future locations of the user, thus can be tuned to protect different privacy objectives along the user’s location trace. We illustrate the efficacy of the optimal location privacy–preserving mechanisms obtained with our approach against real location traces, showing their performance in protecting users’ different location privacy objectives.

2020-02-18
Nasr, Milad, Shokri, Reza, Houmansadr, Amir.  2019.  Comprehensive Privacy Analysis of Deep Learning: Passive and Active White-Box Inference Attacks against Centralized and Federated Learning. 2019 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy (SP). :739–753.

Deep neural networks are susceptible to various inference attacks as they remember information about their training data. We design white-box inference attacks to perform a comprehensive privacy analysis of deep learning models. We measure the privacy leakage through parameters of fully trained models as well as the parameter updates of models during training. We design inference algorithms for both centralized and federated learning, with respect to passive and active inference attackers, and assuming different adversary prior knowledge. We evaluate our novel white-box membership inference attacks against deep learning algorithms to trace their training data records. We show that a straightforward extension of the known black-box attacks to the white-box setting (through analyzing the outputs of activation functions) is ineffective. We therefore design new algorithms tailored to the white-box setting by exploiting the privacy vulnerabilities of the stochastic gradient descent algorithm, which is the algorithm used to train deep neural networks. We investigate the reasons why deep learning models may leak information about their training data. We then show that even well-generalized models are significantly susceptible to white-box membership inference attacks, by analyzing state-of-the-art pre-trained and publicly available models for the CIFAR dataset. We also show how adversarial participants, in the federated learning setting, can successfully run active membership inference attacks against other participants, even when the global model achieves high prediction accuracies.

2020-04-03
Song, Liwei, Shokri, Reza, Mittal, Prateek.  2019.  Membership Inference Attacks Against Adversarially Robust Deep Learning Models. 2019 IEEE Security and Privacy Workshops (SPW). :50—56.
In recent years, the research community has increasingly focused on understanding the security and privacy challenges posed by deep learning models. However, the security domain and the privacy domain have typically been considered separately. It is thus unclear whether the defense methods in one domain will have any unexpected impact on the other domain. In this paper, we take a step towards enhancing our understanding of deep learning models when the two domains are combined together. We do this by measuring the success of membership inference attacks against two state-of-the-art adversarial defense methods that mitigate evasion attacks: adversarial training and provable defense. On the one hand, membership inference attacks aim to infer an individual's participation in the target model's training dataset and are known to be correlated with target model's overfitting. On the other hand, adversarial defense methods aim to enhance the robustness of target models by ensuring that model predictions are unchanged for a small area around each sample in the training dataset. Intuitively, adversarial defenses may rely more on the training dataset and be more vulnerable to membership inference attacks. By performing empirical membership inference attacks on both adversarially robust models and corresponding undefended models, we find that the adversarial training method is indeed more susceptible to membership inference attacks, and the privacy leakage is directly correlated with model robustness. We also find that the provable defense approach does not lead to enhanced success of membership inference attacks. However, this is achieved by significantly sacrificing the accuracy of the model on benign data points, indicating that privacy, security, and prediction accuracy are not jointly achieved in these two approaches.