Visible to the public Biblio

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2020-11-30
Ray, K., Banerjee, A., Mohalik, S. K..  2019.  Web Service Selection with Correlations: A Feature-Based Abstraction Refinement Approach. 2019 IEEE 12th Conference on Service-Oriented Computing and Applications (SOCA). :33–40.
In this paper, we address the web service selection problem for linear workflows. Given a linear workflow specifying a set of ordered tasks and a set of candidate services providing different features for each task, the selection problem deals with the objective of selecting the most eligible service for each task, given the ordering specified. A number of approaches to solving the selection problem have been proposed in literature. With web services growing at an incredible pace, service selection at the Internet scale has resurfaced as a problem of recent research interest. In this work, we present our approach to the selection problem using an abstraction refinement technique to address the scalability limitations of contemporary approaches. Experiments on web service benchmarks show that our approach can add substantial performance benefits in terms of space when compared to an approach without our optimization.
2019-09-23
Zheng, N., Alawini, A., Ives, Z. G..  2019.  Fine-Grained Provenance for Matching ETL. 2019 IEEE 35th International Conference on Data Engineering (ICDE). :184–195.
Data provenance tools capture the steps used to produce analyses. However, scientists must choose among workflow provenance systems, which allow arbitrary code but only track provenance at the granularity of files; provenance APIs, which provide tuple-level provenance, but incur overhead in all computations; and database provenance tools, which track tuple-level provenance through relational operators and support optimization, but support a limited subset of data science tasks. None of these solutions are well suited for tracing errors introduced during common ETL, record alignment, and matching tasks - for data types such as strings, images, etc. Scientists need new capabilities to identify the sources of errors, find why different code versions produce different results, and identify which parameter values affect output. We propose PROVision, a provenance-driven troubleshooting tool that supports ETL and matching computations and traces extraction of content within data objects. PROVision extends database-style provenance techniques to capture equivalences, support optimizations, and enable selective evaluation. We formalize our extensions, implement them in the PROVision system, and validate their effectiveness and scalability for common ETL and matching tasks.
2018-04-04
Montella, Raffaele, Di Luccio, Diana, Marcellino, Livia, Galletti, Ardelio, Kosta, Sokol, Brizius, Alison, Foster, Ian.  2017.  Processing of Crowd-sourced Data from an Internet of Floating Things. Proceedings of the 12th Workshop on Workflows in Support of Large-Scale Science. :8:1–8:11.
Sensors incorporated into mobile devices provide unique opportunities to capture detailed environmental information that cannot be readily collected in other ways. We show here how data from networked navigational sensors on leisure vessels can be used to construct unique new datasets, using the example of underwater topography (bathymetry) to demonstrate the approach. Specifically, we describe an end-to-end workflow that involves the collection of large numbers of timestamped (position, depth) measurements from "internet of floating things" devices on leisure vessels; the communication of data to cloud resources, via a specialized protocol capable of dealing with delayed, intermittent, or even disconnected networks; the integration of measurement data into cloud storage; the efficient correction and interpolation of measurements on a cloud computing platform; and the creation of a continuously updated bathymetric database. Our prototype implementation of this workflow leverages the FACE-IT Galaxy workflow engine to integrate network communication and database components with a CUDA-enabled algorithm running in a virtualized cloud environment.
2017-02-15
Ross Koppel, University of Pennsylvania, Sean W. Smith, Dartmouth College, Jim Blythe, University of Southern California, Vijay Kothari, Dartmouth College.  2015.  Workarounds to Computer Access in Healthcare Organizations: You Want My Password or a Dead Patient? Studies in Health Technology and Informatics Driving Quality Informatics: Fulfilling the Promise . 208

Workarounds to computer access in healthcare are sufficiently common that they often go unnoticed. Clinicians focus on patient care, not cybersecurity. We argue and demonstrate that understanding workarounds to healthcare workers’ computer access requires not only analyses of computer rules, but also interviews and observations with clinicians. In addition, we illustrate the value of shadowing clinicians and conducing focus groups to understand their motivations and tradeoffs for circumvention. Ethnographic investigation of the medical workplace emerges as a critical method of research because in the inevitable conflict between even well-intended people versus the machines, it’s the people who are the more creative, flexible, and motivated. We conducted interviews and observations with hundreds of medical workers and with 19 cybersecurity experts, CIOs, CMIOs, CTO, and IT workers to obtain their perceptions of computer security. We also shadowed clinicians as they worked. We present dozens of ways workers ingeniously circumvent security rules. The clinicians we studied were not “black hat” hackers, but just professionals seeking to accomplish their work despite the security technologies and regulations.
 

Ross Koppel, University of Pennsylvania, Sean W. Smith, Dartmouth College, Jim Blythe, University of Southern California, Vijay Kothari, Dartmouth College.  2015.  Workarounds to Computer Access in Healthcare Organizations: You Want My Password or a Dead Patient? Information Technology and Communications in Health.

Workarounds to computer access in healthcare are sufficiently common that they often go unnoticed. Clinicians focus on patient care, not cybersecurity. We argue and demonstrate that understanding workarounds to healthcare workers’ computer access requires not only analyses of computer rules, but also interviews and observations with clinicians. In addition, we illustrate the value of shadowing clinicians and conducing focus groups to understand their motivations and tradeoffs for circumvention. Ethnographic investigation of the medical workplace emerges as a critical method of research because in the inevitable conflict between even well-intended people versus the machines, it’s the people who are the more creative, flexible, and motivated. We conducted interviews and observations with hundreds of medical workers and with 19 cybersecurity experts, CIOs, CMIOs, CTO, and IT workers to obtain their perceptions of computer security. We also shadowed clinicians as they worked. We present dozens of ways workers ingeniously circumvent security rules. The clinicians we studied were not “black hat” hackers, but just professionals seeking to accomplish their work despite the security technologies and regulations.