Visible to the public Biblio

Filters: Keyword is data cleaning  [Clear All Filters]
2020-07-10
Cai, Zhipeng, Miao, Dongjing, Li, Yingshu.  2019.  Deletion Propagation for Multiple Key Preserving Conjunctive Queries: Approximations and Complexity. 2019 IEEE 35th International Conference on Data Engineering (ICDE). :506—517.

This paper studies the deletion propagation problem in terms of minimizing view side-effect. It is a problem funda-mental to data lineage and quality management which could be a key step in analyzing view propagation and repairing data. The investigated problem is a variant of the standard deletion propagation problem, where given a source database D, a set of key preserving conjunctive queries Q, and the set of views V obtained by the queries in Q, we try to identify a set T of tuples from D whose elimination prevents all the tuples in a given set of deletions on views △V while preserving any other results. The complexity of this problem has been well studied for the case with only a single query. Dichotomies, even trichotomies, for different settings are developed. However, no results on multiple queries are given which is a more realistic case. We study the complexity and approximations of optimizing the side-effect on the views, i.e., find T to minimize the additional damage on V after removing all the tuples of △V. We focus on the class of key-preserving conjunctive queries which is a dichotomy for the single query case. It is surprising to find that except the single query case, this problem is NP-hard to approximate within any constant even for a non-trivial set of multiple project-free conjunctive queries in terms of view side-effect. The proposed algorithm shows that it can be approximated within a bound depending on the number of tuples of both V and △V. We identify a class of polynomial tractable inputs, and provide a dynamic programming algorithm to solve the problem. Besides data lineage, study on this problem could also provide important foundations for the computational issues in data repairing. Furthermore, we introduce some related applications of this problem, especially for query feedback based data cleaning.

2019-07-01
Amjad, N., Afzal, H., Amjad, M. F., Khan, F. A..  2018.  A Multi-Classifier Framework for Open Source Malware Forensics. 2018 IEEE 27th International Conference on Enabling Technologies: Infrastructure for Collaborative Enterprises (WETICE). :106-111.

Traditional anti-virus technologies have failed to keep pace with proliferation of malware due to slow process of their signatures and heuristics updates. Similarly, there are limitations of time and resources in order to perform manual analysis on each malware. There is a need to learn from this vast quantity of data, containing cyber attack pattern, in an automated manner to proactively adapt to ever-evolving threats. Machine learning offers unique advantages to learn from past cyber attacks to handle future cyber threats. The purpose of this research is to propose a framework for multi-classification of malware into well-known categories by applying different machine learning models over corpus of malware analysis reports. These reports are generated through an open source malware sandbox in an automated manner. We applied extensive pre-modeling techniques for data cleaning, features exploration and features engineering to prepare training and test datasets. Best possible hyper-parameters are selected to build machine learning models. These prepared datasets are then used to train the machine learning classifiers and to compare their prediction accuracy. Finally, these results are validated through a comprehensive 10-fold cross-validation methodology. The best results are achieved through Gaussian Naive Bayes classifier with random accuracy of 96% and 10-Fold Cross Validation accuracy of 91.2%. The said framework can be deployed in an operational environment to learn from malware attacks for proactively adapting matching counter measures.

2017-05-22
Krishnan, Sanjay, Wang, Jiannan, Franklin, Michael J., Goldberg, Ken, Kraska, Tim.  2016.  PrivateClean: Data Cleaning and Differential Privacy. Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Management of Data. :937–951.

Recent advances in differential privacy make it possible to guarantee user privacy while preserving the main characteristics of the data. However, most differential privacy mechanisms assume that the underlying dataset is clean. This paper explores the link between data cleaning and differential privacy in a framework we call PrivateClean. PrivateClean includes a technique for creating private datasets of numerical and discrete-valued attributes, a formalism for privacy-preserving data cleaning, and techniques for answering sum, count, and avg queries after cleaning. We show: (1) how the degree of privacy affects subsequent aggregate query accuracy, (2) how privacy potentially amplifies certain types of errors in a dataset, and (3) how this analysis can be used to tune the degree of privacy. The key insight is to maintain a bipartite graph relating dirty values to clean values and use this graph to estimate biases due to the interaction between cleaning and privacy. We validate these results on four datasets with a variety of well-studied cleaning techniques including using functional dependencies, outlier filtering, and resolving inconsistent attributes.

2017-03-07
Wang, Xiaolan, Meliou, Alexandra, Wu, Eugene.  2016.  QFix: Demonstrating Error Diagnosis in Query Histories. Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Management of Data. :2177–2180.

An increasing number of applications in all aspects of society rely on data. Despite the long line of research in data cleaning and repairs, data correctness has been an elusive goal. Errors in the data can be extremely disruptive, and are detrimental to the effectiveness and proper function of data-driven applications. Even when data is cleaned, new errors can be introduced by applications and users who interact with the data. Subsequent valid updates can obscure these errors and propagate them through the dataset causing more discrepancies. Any discovered errors tend to be corrected superficially, on a case-by-case basis, further obscuring the true underlying cause, and making detection of the remaining errors harder. In this demo proposal, we outline the design of QFix, a query-centric framework that derives explanations and repairs for discrepancies in relational data based on potential errors in the queries that operated on the data. This is a marked departure from traditional data-centric techniques that directly fix the data. We then describe how users will use QFix in a demonstration scenario. Participants will be able to select from a number of transactional benchmarks, introduce errors into the queries that are executed, and compare the fixes to the queries proposed by QFix as well as existing alternative algorithms such as decision trees.

Krishnan, Sanjay, Wang, Jiannan, Franklin, Michael J., Goldberg, Ken, Kraska, Tim.  2016.  PrivateClean: Data Cleaning and Differential Privacy. Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Management of Data. :937–951.

Recent advances in differential privacy make it possible to guarantee user privacy while preserving the main characteristics of the data. However, most differential privacy mechanisms assume that the underlying dataset is clean. This paper explores the link between data cleaning and differential privacy in a framework we call PrivateClean. PrivateClean includes a technique for creating private datasets of numerical and discrete-valued attributes, a formalism for privacy-preserving data cleaning, and techniques for answering sum, count, and avg queries after cleaning. We show: (1) how the degree of privacy affects subsequent aggregate query accuracy, (2) how privacy potentially amplifies certain types of errors in a dataset, and (3) how this analysis can be used to tune the degree of privacy. The key insight is to maintain a bipartite graph relating dirty values to clean values and use this graph to estimate biases due to the interaction between cleaning and privacy. We validate these results on four datasets with a variety of well-studied cleaning techniques including using functional dependencies, outlier filtering, and resolving inconsistent attributes.

Almeida, Ricardo, Maio, Paulo, Oliveira, Paulo, Barroso, João.  2016.  Ontology Based Rewriting Data Cleaning Operations. Proceedings of the Ninth International C* Conference on Computer Science & Software Engineering. :85–88.

Dealing with increasing amounts of data creates the need to deal with redundant, inconsistent and/or complementary repositories which may be different in their data models and/or in their schema. Current data cleaning techniques developed to tackle data quality problems are just suitable for scenarios were all repositories share the same model and schema. Recently, an ontology-based methodology was proposed to overcome this limitation. In this paper, this methodology is briefly described and applied to a real scenario in the health domain with data quality problems.

He, Jian, Veltri, Enzo, Santoro, Donatello, Li, Guoliang, Mecca, Giansalvatore, Papotti, Paolo, Tang, Nan.  2016.  Interactive and Deterministic Data Cleaning. Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Management of Data. :893–907.

We present Falcon, an interactive, deterministic, and declarative data cleaning system, which uses SQL update queries as the language to repair data. Falcon does not rely on the existence of a set of pre-defined data quality rules. On the contrary, it encourages users to explore the data, identify possible problems, and make updates to fix them. Bootstrapped by one user update, Falcon guesses a set of possible sql update queries that can be used to repair the data. The main technical challenge addressed in this paper consists in finding a set of sql update queries that is minimal in size and at the same time fixes the largest number of errors in the data. We formalize this problem as a search in a lattice-shaped space. To guarantee that the chosen updates are semantically correct, Falcon navigates the lattice by interacting with users to gradually validate the set of sql update queries. Besides using traditional one-hop based traverse algorithms (e.g., BFS or DFS), we describe novel multi-hop search algorithms such that Falcon can dive over the lattice and conduct the search efficiently. Our novel search strategy is coupled with a number of optimization techniques to further prune the search space and efficiently maintain the lattice. We have conducted extensive experiments using both real-world and synthetic datasets to show that Falcon can effectively communicate with users in data repairing.

Santoro, Donatello, Arocena, Patricia C., Glavic, Boris, Mecca, Giansalvatore, Miller, Renée J., Papotti, Paolo.  2016.  BART in Action: Error Generation and Empirical Evaluations of Data-Cleaning Systems. Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Management of Data. :2161–2164.

Repairing erroneous or conflicting data that violate a set of constraints is an important problem in data management. Many automatic or semi-automatic data-repairing algorithms have been proposed in the last few years, each with its own strengths and weaknesses. Bart is an open-source error-generation system conceived to support thorough experimental evaluations of these data-repairing systems. The demo is centered around three main lessons. To start, we discuss how generating errors in data is a complex problem, with several facets. We introduce the important notions of detectability and repairability of an error, that stand at the core of Bart. Then, we show how, by changing the features of errors, it is possible to influence quite significantly the performance of the tools. Finally, we concretely put to work five data-repairing algorithms on dirty data of various kinds generated using Bart, and discuss their performance.

Chu, Xu, Ilyas, Ihab F., Krishnan, Sanjay, Wang, Jiannan.  2016.  Data Cleaning: Overview and Emerging Challenges. Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Management of Data. :2201–2206.

Detecting and repairing dirty data is one of the perennial challenges in data analytics, and failure to do so can result in inaccurate analytics and unreliable decisions. Over the past few years, there has been a surge of interest from both industry and academia on data cleaning problems including new abstractions, interfaces, approaches for scalability, and statistical techniques. To better understand the new advances in the field, we will first present a taxonomy of the data cleaning literature in which we highlight the recent interest in techniques that use constraints, rules, or patterns to detect errors, which we call qualitative data cleaning. We will describe the state-of-the-art techniques and also highlight their limitations with a series of illustrative examples. While traditionally such approaches are distinct from quantitative approaches such as outlier detection, we also discuss recent work that casts such approaches into a statistical estimation framework including: using Machine Learning to improve the efficiency and accuracy of data cleaning and considering the effects of data cleaning on statistical analysis.

Krishnan, Sanjay, Franklin, Michael J., Goldberg, Ken, Wang, Jiannan, Wu, Eugene.  2016.  ActiveClean: An Interactive Data Cleaning Framework For Modern Machine Learning. Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Management of Data. :2117–2120.

Databases can be corrupted with various errors such as missing, incorrect, or inconsistent values. Increasingly, modern data analysis pipelines involve Machine Learning, and the effects of dirty data can be difficult to debug.Dirty data is often sparse, and naive sampling solutions are not suited for high-dimensional models. We propose ActiveClean, a progressive framework for training Machine Learning models with data cleaning. Our framework updates a model iteratively as the analyst cleans small batches of data, and includes numerous optimizations such as importance weighting and dirty data detection. We designed a visual interface to wrap around this framework and demonstrate ActiveClean for a video classification problem and a topic modeling problem.