Visible to the public Biblio

Filters: Keyword is Optical detectors  [Clear All Filters]
2019-02-14
Arrazola, J. M., Marwah, A., Lovitz, B., Touchette, D., Lutkenhaus, N..  2018.  Cryptographic and Non-Cryptographic Network Applications and Their Optical Implementations. 2018 IEEE Photonics Society Summer Topical Meeting Series (SUM). :9-10.
The use of quantum mechanical signals in communication opens up the opportunity to build new communication systems that accomplishes tasks that communication with classical signals structures cannot achieve. Prominent examples are Quantum Key Distribution Protocols, which allows the generation of secret keys without computational assumptions of adversaries. Over the past decade, protocols have been developed that achieve tasks that can also be accomplished with classical signals, but the quantum version of the protocol either uses less resources, or leaks less information between the involved parties. The gap between quantum and classical can be exponential in the input size of the problems. Examples are the comparison of data, the scheduling of appointments and others. Until recently, it was thought that these protocols are of mere conceptual value, but that the quantum advantage could not be realized. We changed that by developing quantum optical versions of these abstract protocols that can run with simple laser pulses, beam-splitters and detectors. [1-3] By now the first protocols have been successfully implemented [4], showing that a quantum advantage can be realized. The next step is to find and realize protocols that have a high practical value.
2019-01-21
Schrenk, B., Pacher, C..  2018.  1 Gb/s All-LED Visible Light Communication System. 2018 Optical Fiber Communications Conference and Exposition (OFC). :1–3.
We evaluate the use of LEDs intended for illumination as low-cost filtered optical detectors. An optical wireless system that is exclusively based on commercial off-the-shelf 5-mm R/G/B LEDs is experimentally demonstrated for Gb/s close-proximity transmission.
2018-08-23
Birch, G. C., Woo, B. L., LaCasse, C. F., Stubbs, J. J., Dagel, A. L..  2017.  Computational optical physical unclonable functions. 2017 International Carnahan Conference on Security Technology (ICCST). :1–6.

Physical unclonable functions (PUFs) are devices which are easily probed but difficult to predict. Optical PUFs have been discussed within the literature, with traditional optical PUFs typically using spatial light modulators, coherent illumination, and scattering volumes; however, these systems can be large, expensive, and difficult to maintain alignment in practical conditions. We propose and demonstrate a new kind of optical PUF based on computational imaging and compressive sensing to address these challenges with traditional optical PUFs. This work describes the design, simulation, and prototyping of this computational optical PUF (COPUF) that utilizes incoherent polychromatic illumination passing through an additively manufactured refracting optical polymer element. We demonstrate the ability to pass information through a COPUF using a variety of sampling methods, including the use of compressive sensing. The sensitivity of the COPUF system is also explored. We explore non-traditional PUF configurations enabled by the COPUF architecture. The double COPUF system, which employees two serially connected COPUFs, is proposed and analyzed as a means to authenticate and communicate between two entities that have previously agreed to communicate. This configuration enables estimation of a message inversion key without the calculation of individual COPUF inversion keys at any point in the PUF life cycle. Our results show that it is possible to construct inexpensive optical PUFs using computational imaging. This could lead to new uses of PUFs in places where electrical PUFs cannot be utilized effectively, as low cost tags and seals, and potentially as authenticating and communicating devices.