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2021-04-08
Colbaugh, R., Glass, K., Bauer, T..  2013.  Dynamic information-theoretic measures for security informatics. 2013 IEEE International Conference on Intelligence and Security Informatics. :45–49.
Many important security informatics problems require consideration of dynamical phenomena for their solution; examples include predicting the behavior of individuals in social networks and distinguishing malicious and innocent computer network activities based on activity traces. While information theory offers powerful tools for analyzing dynamical processes, to date the application of information-theoretic methods in security domains has focused on static analyses (e.g., cryptography, natural language processing). This paper leverages information-theoretic concepts and measures to quantify the similarity of pairs of stochastic dynamical systems, and shows that this capability can be used to solve important problems which arise in security applications. We begin by presenting a concise review of the information theory required for our development, and then address two challenging tasks: 1.) characterizing the way influence propagates through social networks, and 2.) distinguishing malware from legitimate software based on the instruction sequences of the disassembled programs. In each application, case studies involving real-world datasets demonstrate that the proposed techniques outperform standard methods.
2021-03-15
Staicu, C.-A., Torp, M. T., Schäfer, M., Møller, A., Pradel, M..  2020.  Extracting Taint Specifications for JavaScript Libraries. 2020 IEEE/ACM 42nd International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE). :198—209.

Modern JavaScript applications extensively depend on third-party libraries. Especially for the Node.js platform, vulnerabilities can have severe consequences to the security of applications, resulting in, e.g., cross-site scripting and command injection attacks. Existing static analysis tools that have been developed to automatically detect such issues are either too coarse-grained, looking only at package dependency structure while ignoring dataflow, or rely on manually written taint specifications for the most popular libraries to ensure analysis scalability. In this work, we propose a technique for automatically extracting taint specifications for JavaScript libraries, based on a dynamic analysis that leverages the existing test suites of the libraries and their available clients in the npm repository. Due to the dynamic nature of JavaScript, mapping observations from dynamic analysis to taint specifications that fit into a static analysis is non-trivial. Our main insight is that this challenge can be addressed by a combination of an access path mechanism that identifies entry and exit points, and the use of membranes around the libraries of interest. We show that our approach is effective at inferring useful taint specifications at scale. Our prototype tool automatically extracts 146 additional taint sinks and 7 840 propagation summaries spanning 1 393 npm modules. By integrating the extracted specifications into a commercial, state-of-the-art static analysis, 136 new alerts are produced, many of which correspond to likely security vulnerabilities. Moreover, many important specifications that were originally manually written are among the ones that our tool can now extract automatically.

Danilova, A., Naiakshina, A., Smith, M..  2020.  One Size Does Not Fit All: A Grounded Theory and Online Survey Study of Developer Preferences for Security Warning Types. 2020 IEEE/ACM 42nd International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE). :136–148.
A wide range of tools exist to assist developers in creating secure software. Many of these tools, such as static analysis engines or security checkers included in compilers, use warnings to communicate security issues to developers. The effectiveness of these tools relies on developers heeding these warnings, and there are many ways in which these warnings could be displayed. Johnson et al. [46] conducted qualitative research and found that warning presentation and integration are main issues. We built on Johnson et al.'s work and examined what developers want from security warnings, including what form they should take and how they should integrate into their workflow and work context. To this end, we conducted a Grounded Theory study with 14 professional software developers and 12 computer science students as well as a focus group with 7 academic researchers to gather qualitative insights. To back up the theory developed from the qualitative research, we ran a quantitative survey with 50 professional software developers. Our results show that there is significant heterogeneity amongst developers and that no one warning type is preferred over all others. The context in which the warnings are shown is also highly relevant, indicating that it is likely to be beneficial if IDEs and other development tools become more flexible in their warning interactions with developers. Based on our findings, we provide concrete recommendations for both future research as well as how IDEs and other security tools can improve their interaction with developers.
Hwang, S., Ryu, S..  2020.  Gap between Theory and Practice: An Empirical Study of Security Patches in Solidity. 2020 IEEE/ACM 42nd International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE). :542–553.
Ethereum, one of the most popular blockchain platforms, provides financial transactions like payments and auctions through smart contracts. Due to the immense interest in smart contracts in academia, the research community of smart contract security has made a significant improvement recently. Researchers have reported various security vulnerabilities in smart contracts, and developed static analysis tools and verification frameworks to detect them. However, it is unclear whether such great efforts from academia has indeed enhanced the security of smart contracts in reality. To understand the security level of smart contracts in the wild, we empirically studied 55,046 real-world Ethereum smart contracts written in Solidity, the most popular programming language used by Ethereum smart contract developers. We first examined how many well-known vulnerabilities the Solidity compiler has patched, and how frequently the Solidity team publishes compiler releases. Unfortunately, we observed that many known vulnerabilities are not yet patched, and some patches are not even sufficient to avoid their target vulnerabilities. Subsequently, we investigated whether smart contract developers use the most recent compiler with vulnerabilities patched. We reported that developers of more than 98% of real-world Solidity contracts still use older compilers without vulnerability patches, and more than 25% of the contracts are potentially vulnerable due to the missing security patches. To understand actual impacts of the missing patches, we manually investigated potentially vulnerable contracts that are detected by our static analyzer and identified common mistakes by Solidity developers, which may cause serious security issues such as financial loss. We detected hundreds of vulnerable contracts and about one fourth of the vulnerable contracts are used by thousands of people. We recommend the Solidity team to make patches that resolve known vulnerabilities correctly, and developers to use the latest Solidity compiler to avoid missing security patches.
2021-03-09
Akram, B., Ogi, D..  2020.  The Making of Indicator of Compromise using Malware Reverse Engineering Techniques. 2020 International Conference on ICT for Smart Society (ICISS). CFP2013V-ART:1—6.

Malware threats often go undetected immediately, because attackers can camouflage well within the system. The users realize this after the devices stop working and cause harm for them. One way to deceive malicious content detection, malware authors use packers. Malware analysis is an activity to gain knowledge about malware. Reverse engineering is a technique used to identify and deal with new viruses or to understand malware behavior. Therefore, this technique can be the right choice for conducting malware analysis, especially for malware with packers. The results of the analysis are used as a source for making creating indicator of compromise in the YARA rule format. YARA rule is used as a component for detecting malware using the indicators obtained in the analysis process.

2021-03-04
Matin, I. Muhamad Malik, Rahardjo, B..  2020.  A Framework for Collecting and Analysis PE Malware Using Modern Honey Network (MHN). 2020 8th International Conference on Cyber and IT Service Management (CITSM). :1—5.

Nowadays, Windows is an operating system that is very popular among people, especially users who have limited knowledge of computers. But unconsciously, the security threat to the windows operating system is very high. Security threats can be in the form of illegal exploitation of the system. The most common attack is using malware. To determine the characteristics of malware using dynamic analysis techniques and static analysis is very dependent on the availability of malware samples. Honeypot is the most effective malware collection technique. But honeypot cannot determine the type of file format contained in malware. File format information is needed for the purpose of handling malware analysis that is focused on windows-based malware. For this reason, we propose a framework that can collect malware information as well as identify malware PE file type formats. In this study, we collected malware samples using a modern honey network. Next, we performed a feature extraction to determine the PE file format. Then, we classify types of malware using VirusTotal scanning. As the results of this study, we managed to get 1.222 malware samples. Out of 1.222 malware samples, we successfully extracted 945 PE malware. This study can help researchers in other research fields, such as machine learning and deep learning, for malware detection.

2020-12-17
Sun, P., Garcia, L., Salles-Loustau, G., Zonouz, S..  2020.  Hybrid Firmware Analysis for Known Mobile and IoT Security Vulnerabilities. 2020 50th Annual IEEE/IFIP International Conference on Dependable Systems and Networks (DSN). :373—384.

Mobile and IoT operating systems–and their ensuing software updates–are usually distributed as binary files. Given that these binary files are commonly closed source, users or businesses who want to assess the security of the software need to rely on reverse engineering. Further, verifying the correct application of the latest software patches in a given binary is an open problem. The regular application of software patches is a central pillar for improving mobile and IoT device security. This requires developers, integrators, and vendors to propagate patches to all affected devices in a timely and coordinated fashion. In practice, vendors follow different and sometimes improper security update agendas for both mobile and IoT products. Moreover, previous studies revealed the existence of a hidden patch gap: several vendors falsely reported that they patched vulnerabilities. Therefore, techniques to verify whether vulnerabilities have been patched or not in a given binary are essential. Deep learning approaches have shown to be promising for static binary analyses with respect to inferring binary similarity as well as vulnerability detection. However, these approaches fail to capture the dynamic behavior of these systems, and, as a result, they may inundate the analysis with false positives when performing vulnerability discovery in the wild. In particular, they cannot capture the fine-grained characteristics necessary to distinguish whether a vulnerability has been patched or not. In this paper, we present PATCHECKO, a vulnerability and patch presence detection framework for executable binaries. PATCHECKO relies on a hybrid, cross-platform binary code similarity analysis that combines deep learning-based static binary analysis with dynamic binary analysis. PATCHECKO does not require access to the source code of the target binary nor that of vulnerable functions. We evaluate PATCHECKO on the most recent Google Pixel 2 smartphone and the Android Things IoT firmware images, within which 25 known CVE vulnerabilities have been previously reported and patched. Our deep learning model shows a vulnerability detection accuracy of over 93%. We further prune the candidates found by the deep learning stage–which includes false positives–via dynamic binary analysis. Consequently, PATCHECKO successfully identifies the correct matches among the candidate functions in the top 3 ranked outcomes 100% of the time. Furthermore, PATCHECKO's differential engine distinguishes between functions that are still vulnerable and those that are patched with an accuracy of 96%.

2020-12-11
Ge, X., Pan, Y., Fan, Y., Fang, C..  2019.  AMDroid: Android Malware Detection Using Function Call Graphs. 2019 IEEE 19th International Conference on Software Quality, Reliability and Security Companion (QRS-C). :71—77.

With the rapid development of the mobile Internet, Android has been the most popular mobile operating system. Due to the open nature of Android, c countless malicious applications are hidden in a large number of benign applications, which pose great threats to users. Most previous malware detection approaches mainly rely on features such as permissions, API calls, and opcode sequences. However, these approaches fail to capture structural semantics of applications. In this paper, we propose AMDroid that leverages function call graphs (FCGs) representing the behaviors of applications and applies graph kernels to automatically learn the structural semantics of applications from FCGs. We evaluate AMDroid on the Genome Project, and the experimental results show that AMDroid is effective to detect Android malware with 97.49% detection accuracy.

Abusnaina, A., Khormali, A., Alasmary, H., Park, J., Anwar, A., Mohaisen, A..  2019.  Adversarial Learning Attacks on Graph-based IoT Malware Detection Systems. 2019 IEEE 39th International Conference on Distributed Computing Systems (ICDCS). :1296—1305.

IoT malware detection using control flow graph (CFG)-based features and deep learning networks are widely explored. The main goal of this study is to investigate the robustness of such models against adversarial learning. We designed two approaches to craft adversarial IoT software: off-the-shelf methods and Graph Embedding and Augmentation (GEA) method. In the off-the-shelf adversarial learning attack methods, we examine eight different adversarial learning methods to force the model to misclassification. The GEA approach aims to preserve the functionality and practicality of the generated adversarial sample through a careful embedding of a benign sample to a malicious one. Intensive experiments are conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, showing that off-the-shelf adversarial attack methods are able to achieve a misclassification rate of 100%. In addition, we observed that the GEA approach is able to misclassify all IoT malware samples as benign. The findings of this work highlight the essential need for more robust detection tools against adversarial learning, including features that are not easy to manipulate, unlike CFG-based features. The implications of the study are quite broad, since the approach challenged in this work is widely used for other applications using graphs.

Wu, Y., Li, X., Zou, D., Yang, W., Zhang, X., Jin, H..  2019.  MalScan: Fast Market-Wide Mobile Malware Scanning by Social-Network Centrality Analysis. 2019 34th IEEE/ACM International Conference on Automated Software Engineering (ASE). :139—150.

Malware scanning of an app market is expected to be scalable and effective. However, existing approaches use either syntax-based features which can be evaded by transformation attacks or semantic-based features which are usually extracted by performing expensive program analysis. Therefor, in this paper, we propose a lightweight graph-based approach to perform Android malware detection. Instead of traditional heavyweight static analysis, we treat function call graphs of apps as social networks and perform social-network-based centrality analysis to represent the semantic features of the graphs. Our key insight is that centrality provides a succinct and fault-tolerant representation of graph semantics, especially for graphs with certain amount of inaccurate information (e.g., inaccurate call graphs). We implement a prototype system, MalScan, and evaluate it on datasets of 15,285 benign samples and 15,430 malicious samples. Experimental results show that MalScan is capable of detecting Android malware with up to 98% accuracy under one second which is more than 100 times faster than two state-of-the-art approaches, namely MaMaDroid and Drebin. We also demonstrate the feasibility of MalScan on market-wide malware scanning by performing a statistical study on over 3 million apps. Finally, in a corpus of dataset collected from Google-Play app market, MalScan is able to identify 18 zero-day malware including malware samples that can evade detection of existing tools.

2020-12-02
Gliksberg, J., Capra, A., Louvet, A., García, P. J., Sohier, D..  2019.  High-Quality Fault-Resiliency in Fat-Tree Networks (Extended Abstract). 2019 IEEE Symposium on High-Performance Interconnects (HOTI). :9—12.
Coupling regular topologies with optimized routing algorithms is key in pushing the performance of interconnection networks of HPC systems. In this paper we present Dmodc, a fast deterministic routing algorithm for Parallel Generalized Fat-Trees (PGFTs) which minimizes congestion risk even under massive topology degradation caused by equipment failure. It applies a modulo-based computation of forwarding tables among switches closer to the destination, using only knowledge of subtrees for pre-modulo division. Dmodc allows complete re-routing of topologies with tens of thousands of nodes in less than a second, which greatly helps centralized fabric management react to faults with high-quality routing tables and no impact to running applications in current and future very large-scale HPC clusters. We compare Dmodc against routing algorithms available in the InfiniBand control software (OpenSM) first for routing execution time to show feasibility at scale, and then for congestion risk under degradation to demonstrate robustness. The latter comparison is done using static analysis of routing tables under random permutation (RP), shift permutation (SP) and all-to-all (A2A) traffic patterns. Results for Dmodc show A2A and RP congestion risks similar under heavy degradation as the most stable algorithms compared, and near-optimal SP congestion risk up to 1% of random degradation.
2020-11-09
Farhadi, M., Haddad, H., Shahriar, H..  2019.  Compliance Checking of Open Source EHR Applications for HIPAA and ONC Security and Privacy Requirements. 2019 IEEE 43rd Annual Computer Software and Applications Conference (COMPSAC). 1:704–713.
Electronic Health Record (EHR) applications are digital versions of paper-based patient's health information. They are increasingly adopted to improved quality in healthcare, such as convenient access to histories of patient medication and clinic visits, easier follow up of patient treatment plans, and precise medical decision-making process. EHR applications are guided by measures of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) to ensure confidentiality, integrity, and availability. Furthermore, Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) for Health Information Technology (HIT) certification criteria for usability of EHRs. A compliance checking approach attempts to identify whether or not an adopted EHR application meets the security and privacy criteria. There is no study in the literature to understand whether traditional static code analysis-based vulnerability discovered can assist in compliance checking of regulatory requirements of HIPAA and ONC. This paper attempts to address this issue. We identify security and privacy requirements for HIPAA technical requirements, and identify a subset of ONC criteria related to security and privacy, and then evaluate EHR applications for security vulnerabilities. Finally propose mitigation of security issues towards better compliance and to help practitioners reuse open source tools towards certification compliance.
2020-10-29
Wei, Qu, Xiao, Shi, Dongbao, Li.  2019.  Malware Classification System Based on Machine Learning. 2019 Chinese Control And Decision Conference (CCDC). :647—652.

The main challenge for malware researchers is the large amount of data and files that need to be evaluated for potential threats. Researchers analyze a large number of new malware daily and classify them in order to extract common features. Therefore, a system that can ensure and improve the efficiency and accuracy of the classification is of great significance for the study of malware characteristics. A high-performance, high-efficiency automatic classification system based on multi-feature selection fusion of machine learning is proposed in this paper. Its performance and efficiency, according to our experiments, have been greatly improved compared to single-featured systems.

2020-10-26
Samantray, Om Prakash, Tripathy, Satya Narayan, Das, Susanta Kumar.  2019.  A study to Understand Malware Behavior through Malware Analysis. 2019 IEEE International Conference on System, Computation, Automation and Networking (ICSCAN). :1–5.
Most of the malware detection techniques use malware signatures for detection. It is easy to detect known malicious program in a system but the problem arises when the malware is unknown. Because, unknown malware cannot be detected by using available known malware signatures. Signature based detection techniques fails to detect unknown and zero-day attacks. A novel approach is required to represent malware features effectively to detect obfuscated, unknown, and mutated malware. This paper emphasizes malware behavior, characteristics and properties extracted by different analytic techniques and to decide whether to include them to create behavioral based malware signature. We have made an attempt to understand the malware behavior using a few openly available tools for malware analysis.
Criswell, John, Zhou, Jie, Gravani, Spyridoula, Hu, Xiaoyu.  2019.  PrivAnalyzer: Measuring the Efficacy of Linux Privilege Use. 2019 49th Annual IEEE/IFIP International Conference on Dependable Systems and Networks (DSN). :593–604.
Operating systems such as Linux break the power of the root user into separate privileges (which Linux calls capabilities) and give processes the ability to enable privileges only when needed and to discard them permanently when the program no longer needs them. However, there is no method of measuring how well the use of such facilities reduces the risk of privilege escalation attacks if the program has a vulnerability. This paper presents PrivAnalyzer, an automated tool that measures how effectively programs use Linux privileges. PrivAnalyzer consists of three components: 1) AutoPriv, an existing LLVM-based C/C++ compiler which uses static analysis to transform a program that uses Linux privileges into a program that safely removes them when no longer needed, 2) ChronoPriv, a new LLVM C/C++ compiler pass that performs dynamic analysis to determine for how long a program retains various privileges, and 3) ROSA, a new bounded model checker that can model the damage a program can do at each program point if an attacker can exploit the program and abuse its privileges. We use PrivAnalyzer to determine how long five privileged open source programs retain the ability to cause serious damage to a system and find that merely transforming a program to drop privileges does not significantly improve security. However, we find that simple refactoring can considerably increase the efficacy of Linux privileges. In two programs that we refactored, we reduced the percentage of execution in which a device file can be read and written from 97% and 88% to 4% and 1%, respectively.
2020-09-28
Ibrahim, Ahmed, El-Ramly, Mohammad, Badr, Amr.  2019.  Beware of the Vulnerability! How Vulnerable are GitHub's Most Popular PHP Applications? 2019 IEEE/ACS 16th International Conference on Computer Systems and Applications (AICCSA). :1–7.
The presence of software vulnerabilities is a serious threat to any software project. Exploiting them can compromise system availability, data integrity, and confidentiality. Unfortunately, many open source projects go for years with undetected ready-to-exploit critical vulnerabilities. In this study, we investigate the presence of software vulnerabilities in open source projects and the factors that influence this presence. We analyzed the top 100 open source PHP applications in GitHub using a static analysis vulnerability scanner to examine how common software vulnerabilities are. We also discussed which vulnerabilities are most present and what factors contribute to their presence. We found that 27% of these projects are insecure, with a median number of 3 vulnerabilities per vulnerable project. We found that the most common type is injection vulnerabilities, which made 58% of all detected vulnerabilities. Out of these, cross-site scripting (XSS) was the most common and made 43.5% of all vulnerabilities found. Statistical analysis revealed that project activities like branching, pulling, and committing have a moderate positive correlation with the number of vulnerabilities in the project. Other factors like project popularity, number of releases, and number of issues had almost no influence on the number of vulnerabilities. We recommend that open source project owners should set secure code development guidelines for their project members and establish secure code reviews as part of the project's development process.
2020-09-21
Takahashi, Hironao, Lakhani, Uzair.  2019.  Multiple Layered Security Analyses Method for Cryptocurrency Exchange Servicers. 2019 IEEE 8th Global Conference on Consumer Electronics (GCCE). :71–73.
Internet is a common method of trading business today. The usage of cryptocurrencies has increased these days and it has become a trend to utilize them. Cryptocurrency exchange servicers provide different smartphone apps that unfortunately may become the target of malicious attacks. This paper focuses on how it achieves highest security and proposes the multiple layered security analyses method for cryptocurrency exchange servicers.
2020-08-14
Gu, Zuxing, Zhou, Min, Wu, Jiecheng, Jiang, Yu, Liu, Jiaxiang, Gu, Ming.  2019.  IMSpec: An Extensible Approach to Exploring the Incorrect Usage of APIs. 2019 International Symposium on Theoretical Aspects of Software Engineering (TASE). :216—223.
Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) usually have usage constraints, such as call conditions or call orders. Incorrect usage of these constraints, called API misuse, will result in system crashes, bugs, and even security problems. It is crucial to detect such misuses early in the development process. Though many approaches have been proposed over the last years, recent studies show that API misuses are still prevalent, especially the ones specific to individual projects. In this paper, we strive to improve current API-misuse detection capability for large-scale C programs. First, We propose IMSpec, a lightweight domain-specific language enabling developers to specify API usage constraints in three different aspects (i.e., parameter validation, error handling, and causal calling), which are the majority of API-misuse bugs. Then, we have tailored a constraint guided static analysis engine to automatically parse IMSpec rules and detect API-misuse bugs with rich semantics. We evaluate our approach on widely used benchmarks and real-world projects. The results show that our easily extensible approach performs better than state-of-the-art tools. We also discover 19 previously unknown bugs in real-world open-source projects, all of which have been confirmed by the corresponding developers.
Gu, Zuxing, Wu, Jiecheng, Liu, Jiaxiang, Zhou, Min, Gu, Ming.  2019.  An Empirical Study on API-Misuse Bugs in Open-Source C Programs. 2019 IEEE 43rd Annual Computer Software and Applications Conference (COMPSAC). 1:11—20.
Today, large and complex software is developed with integrated components using application programming interfaces (APIs). Correct usage of APIs in practice presents a challenge due to implicit constraints, such as call conditions or call orders. API misuse, i.e., violation of these constraints, is a well-known source of bugs, some of which can cause serious security vulnerabilities. Although researchers have developed many API-misuse detectors over the last two decades, recent studies show that API misuses are still prevalent. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive empirical study on API-misuse bugs in open-source C programs. To understand the nature of API misuses in practice, we analyze 830 API-misuse bugs from six popular programs across different domains. For all the studied bugs, we summarize their root causes, fix patterns and usage statistics. Furthermore, to understand the capabilities and limitations of state-of-the-art static analysis detectors for API-misuse detection, we develop APIMU4C, a dataset of API-misuse bugs in C code based on our empirical study results, and evaluate three widely-used detectors on it qualitatively and quantitatively. We share all the findings and present possible directions towards more powerful API-misuse detectors.
2020-08-10
Ko, Ju-Seong, Jo, Jeong-Seok, Kim, Deuk-Hun, Choi, Seul-Ki, Kwak, Jin.  2019.  Real Time Android Ransomware Detection by Analyzed Android Applications. 2019 International Conference on Electronics, Information, and Communication (ICEIC). :1–5.
Recently, damage caused by ransomware has been increasing in PC and Android environments. There are many studies into real-time ransomware detection because the most important time to prevent encryption is before ransomware is able to execute its malicious process. Traditional analyses determine an application is ransomware or not by static/dynamic methods. Those analyses can serve as components of a method to detect ransomware in real time. However, problems can occur such as the inability to detect new/variant/unknown ransomware. These types require signed patches from a trusted party that can only be created after attacks occur. In a previous study into realtime new/variant/unknown ransomware detection in a PC environment, important files are monitored and only programs that have been previously analyzed and evaluated as nonmalicious are allowed. As such, programs that have not been analyzed are restricted from accessing important files. In an Android environment, this method can be applied using Android applications to prevent emerging threats and verify consistency with user intent. Thus, this paper proposes a method of detecting new/variant/unknown ransomware in real time in an Android environment.
2020-07-30
Zhang, Jin, Jin, Dahai, Gong, Yunzhan.  2018.  File Similarity Determination Based on Function Call Graph. 2018 IEEE International Conference on Electronics and Communication Engineering (ICECE). :55—59.
The similarity detection of the program has important significance in code reuse, plagiarism detection, intellectual property protection and information retrieval methods. Attribute counting methods cannot take into account program semantics. The method based on syntax tree or graph structure has a very high construction cost and low space efficiency. So it is difficult to solve problems in large-scale software systems. This paper uses different decision strategies for different levels, then puts forward a similarity detection method at the file level. This method can make full use of the features of the program and take into account the space-time efficiency. By using static analysis methods, we get function features and control flow features of files. And based on this, we establish the function call graph. The similar degree between two files can be measured with the two graphs. Experimental results show the method can effectively detect similar files. Finally, this paper discusses the direction of development of this method.
2020-07-10
Nahmias, Daniel, Cohen, Aviad, Nissim, Nir, Elovici, Yuval.  2019.  TrustSign: Trusted Malware Signature Generation in Private Clouds Using Deep Feature Transfer Learning. 2019 International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN). :1—8.

This paper presents TrustSign, a novel, trusted automatic malware signature generation method based on high-level deep features transferred from a VGG-19 neural network model pre-trained on the ImageNet dataset. While traditional automatic malware signature generation techniques rely on static or dynamic analysis of the malware's executable, our method overcomes the limitations associated with these techniques by producing signatures based on the presence of the malicious process in the volatile memory. Signatures generated using TrustSign well represent the real malware behavior during runtime. By leveraging the cloud's virtualization technology, TrustSign analyzes the malicious process in a trusted manner, since the malware is unaware and cannot interfere with the inspection procedure. Additionally, by removing the dependency on the malware's executable, our method is capable of signing fileless malware. Thus, we focus our research on in-browser cryptojacking attacks, which current antivirus solutions have difficulty to detect. However, TrustSign is not limited to cryptojacking attacks, as our evaluation included various ransomware samples. TrustSign's signature generation process does not require feature engineering or any additional model training, and it is done in a completely unsupervised manner, obviating the need for a human expert. Therefore, our method has the advantage of dramatically reducing signature generation and distribution time. The results of our experimental evaluation demonstrate TrustSign's ability to generate signatures invariant to the process state over time. By using the signatures generated by TrustSign as input for various supervised classifiers, we achieved 99.5% classification accuracy.

Saad, Muhammad, Khormali, Aminollah, Mohaisen, Aziz.  2019.  Dine and Dash: Static, Dynamic, and Economic Analysis of In-Browser Cryptojacking. 2019 APWG Symposium on Electronic Crime Research (eCrime). :1—12.

Cryptojacking is the permissionless use of a target device to covertly mine cryptocurrencies. With cryptojacking attackers use malicious JavaScript codes to force web browsers into solving proof-of-work puzzles, thus making money by exploiting resources of the website visitors. To understand and counter such attacks, we systematically analyze the static, dynamic, and economic aspects of in-browser cryptojacking. For static analysis, we perform content-, currency-, and code-based categorization of cryptojacking samples to 1) measure their distribution across websites, 2) highlight their platform affinities, and 3) study their code complexities. We apply unsupervised learning to distinguish cryptojacking scripts from benign and other malicious JavaScript samples with 96.4% accuracy. For dynamic analysis, we analyze the effect of cryptojacking on critical system resources, such as CPU and battery usage. Additionally, we perform web browser fingerprinting to analyze the information exchange between the victim node and the dropzone cryptojacking server. We also build an analytical model to empirically evaluate the feasibility of cryptojacking as an alternative to online advertisement. Our results show a large negative profit and loss gap, indicating that the model is economically impractical. Finally, by leveraging insights from our analyses, we build countermeasures for in-browser cryptojacking that improve upon the existing remedies.

2020-06-26
Puccetti, Armand.  2019.  The European H2020 project VESSEDIA (Verification Engineering of Safety and SEcurity critical Dynamic Industrial Applications). 2019 22nd Euromicro Conference on Digital System Design (DSD). :588—591.

This paper presents an overview of the H2020 project VESSEDIA [9] aimed at verifying the security and safety of modern connected systems also called IoT. The originality relies in using Formal Methods inherited from high-criticality applications domains to analyze the source code at different levels of intensity, to gather possible faults and weaknesses. The analysis methods are mostly exhaustive an guarantee that, after analysis, the source code of the application is error-free. This paper is structured as follows: after an introductory section 1 giving some factual data, section 2 presents the aims and the problems addressed; section 3 describes the project's use-cases and section 4 describes the proposed approach for solving these problems and the results achieved until now; finally, section 5 discusses some remaining future work.

2020-03-23
Qin, Peng, Tan, Cheng, Zhao, Lei, Cheng, Yueqiang.  2019.  Defending against ROP Attacks with Nearly Zero Overhead. 2019 IEEE Global Communications Conference (GLOBECOM). :1–6.
Return-Oriented Programming (ROP) is a sophisticated exploitation technique that is able to drive target applications to perform arbitrary unintended operations by constructing a gadget chain reusing existing small code sequences (gadgets) collected across the entire code space. In this paper, we propose to address ROP attacks from a different angle-shrinking available code space at runtime. We present ROPStarvation , a generic and transparent ROP countermeasure that defend against all types of ROP attacks with almost zero run-time overhead. ROPStarvation does not aim to completely stop ROP attacks, instead it attempts to significantly increase the bar by decreasing the possibility of launching a successful ROP exploit in reality. Moreover, shrinking available code space at runtime is lightweight that makes ROPStarvation practical for being deployed with high performance requirement. Results show that ROPStarvation successfully reduces the code space of target applications by 85%. With the reduced code segments, ROPStarvation decreases the probability of building a valid ROP gadget chain by 100% and 83% respectively, with the assumptions that whether the adversary knows the vulnerable applications are protected by ROPStarvation . Evaluations on the SPEC CPU2006 benchmark show that ROPStarvation introduces nearly zero (0.2% on average) run-time performance overhead.